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NEWS
December 23, 2007
Elise Kraner Babbitt & John Glenn Welker, both of Baltimore, were married November 10, 2007, by Rev. Laura Cannon, at The Maryland Club in Baltimore, Md. The bride is the daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Fred & Janis Babbitt of McGaheysville, Va. The groom is the son of Mr. & Mrs. Glenn & Alicia Welker of Silver Spring, Md. Daniel Babbitt & Charles Hager were ushers. Natalie & Meg Williams were flower girls. The bride graduated from Spotswood High School & received a B.A. in Government from the University of Virginia.
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NEWS
December 23, 2007
Elise Kraner Babbitt & John Glenn Welker, both of Baltimore, were married November 10, 2007, by Rev. Laura Cannon, at The Maryland Club in Baltimore, Md. The bride is the daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Fred & Janis Babbitt of McGaheysville, Va. The groom is the son of Mr. & Mrs. Glenn & Alicia Welker of Silver Spring, Md. Daniel Babbitt & Charles Hager were ushers. Natalie & Meg Williams were flower girls. The bride graduated from Spotswood High School & received a B.A. in Government from the University of Virginia.
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NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton cleared his schedule yesterday to go over the three finalists for the Supreme Court vacancy, amid signs he had zeroed in on one of them: Interior Secretary Bruce E. Babbitt."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 10, 2006
FELTON, Calif. -- The little wooden house surrounded by redwoods in the Santa Cruz Mountains is more than 6,000 miles and 60 years away from the horrors of Auschwitz. But on an easel in the sunny living room is a small portrait that Dina Gottliebova Babbitt recently painted of a fellow prisoner in that Nazi death camp. The picture is a modified copy of one she was forced to paint in 1944 as part of Josef Mengele's murderous theorizing about racial differences. Mengele had plucked Babbitt, a Czech Jew, from a group headed to the gas chambers and ordered the artist to produce portraits of doomed Gypsies that would capture skin tone better than his photographs did. "I painted what I saw, very definitely," recalls Babbitt, now 83 and a retired Hollywood animator.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- With the Republican-controlled Congress preparing to rewrite the Endangered Species Act, the Clinton administration proposed changes yesterday intended to increase the law's flexibility and decrease its economic costs without putting rare plants and animals in greater danger of extinction.Among other things, the administration said it wanted to exempt from regulation activities on most small plots, like house lots, allowing owners to disturb the habitats of endangered and threatened species as long as the overall effect on the species was negligible.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | June 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton is set to pick a member of his Cabinet, Interior Secretary Bruce E. Babbitt, for a seat on the Supreme Court soon, barring a last-minute change of mind, people familiar with the nomination process said yesterday.After one of the longest searches in history for a justice, the president reportedly has settled on Mr. Babbitt, a longtime political associate and friend, to take the seat to be vacated later this month by retiring Justice Byron R. White.From Capitol Hill to the White House, and in lobbyists' offices in between, it was a nearly unanimous view that Mr. Clinton has decided to pass over all of the judges on his list, preferring instead to have a more prominent, politically experienced figure whom he knows personally -- and that is why Mr. Babbitt has suddenly reached the top."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 17, 1993
In a policy switch intended to head off conflicts over endangered species, Interior Secretary Bruce E. Babbitt is preparing a major shift in the federal government's focus on wildlife protection.To avert what he calls "national train wrecks" in clashes such as the spotted owl controversy, Mr. Babbitt hopes to avoid resorting to emergency measures to protect suddenly endangered species by moving instead to preventive medicine based on the long-term protection of whole ecosystems and all their inhabitants.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 18, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Interior Secretary Bruce E. Babbitt sought yesterday to quell another Western uprising over his bid to reform the use of federal lands by ranchers, but instead he stirred fresh controversy with grazing initiatives that pleased neither environmentalists nor live stock producers.Mr. Babbitt's proposal, announced yesterday, would double the fees that most ranchers pay to graze their sheep and cattle on federal land and would institute management reforms to improve the environmental health of the public ranges.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | June 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- By the time President Clinton finally pick Bruce E. Babbitt for the Supreme Court -- if, in fact, he does -- the nominee just might have a public image that his own family would not recognize.And if Mr. Clinton decides not to nominate Mr. Babbitt, onereason could be the president's unwillingness to fight over that image.Either way, Mr. Babbitt could conclude that he had been "Borked."The word is not in the new 10th edition of "Webster's Collegiate Dictionary," just out last month, but it will be in the next edition of National Textbook Co.'s "Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions," according to that book's author and now the company's dictionary director, Richard A. Spears.
NEWS
By NORRIS P. WEST and NORRIS P. WEST,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1995
U.S. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt looked o'er the ramparts and the banner yet waving at Fort McHenry yesterday and suggested that the twilight's last gleaming soon could descend on the birthplace of the national anthem.But a Republican elsewhere said nonsense, Mr. Babbitt's little bomb was bursting with hot air.Against the South Baltimore backdrop of the place that inspired Francis Scott Key to write the "The Star-Spangled Banner," Mr. Babbitt asked a group of Locust Point residents to fight a congressional bill that he said could close national parks and historic sites.
NEWS
By James Rainey and James Rainey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 22, 2005
The young soldier died like so many others, ambushed while on patrol in Baghdad, Iraq. Medics rushed him to a field hospital but couldn't get his heart beating again. What set Army Spc. Travis Babbitt's last moments in Iraq apart was that he confronted them in front of a journalist's camera. An Associated Press photograph of the mortally wounded Babbitt remains a rarity - one of a handful of pictures of dead or dying American service members to be printed in this country since the start of the Iraq war more than two years ago. A review of six prominent U.S. newspapers and the nation's two most popular newsmagazines during a recent six-month period found almost no pictures from the war zone of Americans killed in action.
NEWS
April 3, 2005
On March 30, 2005, ALVINA THERESA FINEO (nee Kliethermes), of Cockeysville, MD; beloved wife of the late Joseph Nicholas Fineo; devoted father of Joseph E. Fineo and his wife Liz, of Virginia Beach, VA and Karen A. Posterino and her husband Peter, of Cockeysville, MD; loving grandmother of Kristie Babbitt, Katherine Posterino, Kenneth Fineo and the late Richard Posterino; dear sister of Leona Adamski, of Jefferson City, MO and the late Rose Knaebel, Sophia...
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 22, 2005
For the soldiers of Dog Company, life in Iraq is long stretches of stomach-churning anxiety, suddenly interrupted by explosions and mad bursts of confusion, injury and death. There is a shared look of raw pain that never seems to leave the faces of these young GIs as they move through a hellish landscape of bombed-out buildings, dust and caravans of Humvees heading up and down roads that seem impossible to secure. That's the story and the dominant image of A Company of Soldiers, a searing Frontline documentary airing on PBS tonight that takes viewers inside the lives of a nine-member group of soldiers from Dog Company of the U.S. Army's 8th Cavalry Regiment.
NEWS
April 25, 2004
Harry Babbitt, 90, who sang in his warm, high-baritone voice with the Kay Kyser big band on such hits as "The White Cliffs of Dover," died April 9 at a nursing home in Aliso Viejo, Calif. Dubbed "Handsome Harry" by Mr. Kyser, he sang on several hits, including "Three Little Fishies," "On A Slow Boat to China," "(Lights Out) 'Til Reveille," "He Wears a Pair of Silver Wings," "Jingle, Jangle, Jingle" and "The Umbrella Man." His high voice was later used on a solo recording of "All I Want for Christmas Is My Two Front Teeth."
NEWS
August 12, 2003
On August 8, 2003, JOSEPH NICHOLAS FINEO, beloved husband of Alvino T. Fineo (nee Kliethermes); devoted father of Joseph E. Fineo and his wife Liz Fineo, Karen A. Postorino and her husband Peter Postorino; dear brother of Jimmy, Frank and Tony Fineo, and the late Mike, Carlo and Grace Fineo, and Frances Young; grandfather of Kristie Babbitt and her husband Dan Babbitt, Katherine Postorino, Kenneth Fineo and the late Richard Postorino. Joseph was a U.S. Naval Veteran of WWII and a retired New York City Transit Authority Supervisor.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 2000
SANTA FE, N.M. - With a scathing indictment of the federal response to fires that have now burned nearly 80 square miles of northern New Mexico and more than 400 homes, Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt said yesterday that the government was wholly to blame and would do whatever possible to compensate victims. "The calculations that went into this were seriously flawed," Babbitt said at a news conference in which federal officials described how a planned burn for a small section in Bandelier National Monument quickly raged out of control, overtaking wide areas beyond, including the city of Los Alamos and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a nuclear facility.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department yesterday requested an interview with an Interior Department official, reportedly as part of a preliminary investigation of Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt. The inquiry could lead to the appointment of an independent counsel.The subject of the interviews is thought to be allegations that Babbitt rejected an application for an Indian casino in response to pressure from White House officials and some rival Indian tribes who were big Democratic donors.Babbitt spokesman Michael Gauldin said Justice officials asked to interview a member of Babbitt's staff, but not the secretary himself.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 1999
DENVER -- Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt favors a policy change that would allow members of the Hopi tribe to remove golden eagles from a national monument in northern Arizona, a move that critics fear could open the door to hunting in national parks.The issue at the Wupatki National Monument near Flagstaff, Ariz., has been percolating since summer, when the Hopi requested permission to take eaglets for use in a religious ceremony. Taking or hunting of animals in national parks is prohibited, but Babbitt said in an interview that he favors allowing an exception in this case.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 22, 1999
FRUITA, Colo. -- But for the dusty hiking boots and fleece pullover, Bruce Babbitt could have been a game show host: gripping a microphone, swishing the cord out of the way and announcing to the audience, "Let's have at it!"With gusto, the Interior secretary launched into a two-hour free-for-all with a not-totally, friendly gathering of local residents at the Colorado National Monument last week, listening to land-use concerns while selling his message of accelerated public lands conservation to a crowd of skeptical Westerners.
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