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By New York Times News Service | August 27, 1993
LAGOS, Nigeria -- Ending months of speculation, Gen. Ibrahim Babangida of Nigeria resigned yesterday and a new interim civilian leader was sworn in after eight years of military rule.Ernest Shonekan, 57, a Harvard-educated businessman, was appointed by General Babangida to head an interim government in Africa's most populous country. He had been chairman of the Transitional Council, a group created in January by the military authorities to oversee Nigeria's return to democracy.But Mr. Shonekan's commitment to democratic rule is questioned by the political opposition and even by some neutral analysts.
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NEWS
August 14, 1994
The strike in Nigeria's oil fields is curtailing production and threatening exports and foreign exchange. The bank strike in Lagos is shutting down daily commerce in the metropolis. Power and water are intermittently cut off in many neighborhoods. The price of staples is soaring.These are all political protests against the military government of General Sani Abacha for suppressing last year's presidential election and trying its undoubted winner, Moshood Abiola, for treason. It may well be the people, not the rulers, who suffer from such protests, but it is the people who are mounting them.
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NEWS
August 22, 1993
Nigeria is the giant of Africa. Nigeria is a bastion of education and sophistication. Nigeria is leading the West African operation to restore civil society to Liberia. But Nigeria has trouble ruling itself. Its main obstacle is a military dictator who promised to restore democracy and went half-way and now won't follow through.The stakes are rising. It may be Nigeria, not smaller Liberia, where civil war threatens life and the pursuit of happiness. The Nigeria Labor Congress told its 3.5 million trade-union members to strike this coming Friday if President Ibrahim Babangida has not handed over power by then, the day he long promised for the turnover.
NEWS
July 14, 1994
Nigeria is too diverse and great a country for Gen. Sani Abacha, who seized power in November, to rule as his personal fiefdom. He pretends to have started up a constitutional process to replace the elected national legislature, state governments and local assemblies he dismantled. Actually, he is fighting the tides. Now he is taking on the oil industry work force, the source of Nigeria's wealth.It was quixotic of businessman Moshood K. O. Abiola to claim to be president of Africa's most populous country, last month, on the first anniversary of the election he won. The former strongman, Gen. Ibrahim Babangida, had suspended that vote, set up a puppet regime, then stepped down after protest by his countrymen.
NEWS
June 30, 1993
It turned out that the people of Nigeria who voted for a president June 12 took it seriously and did not want the dictator, Ibrahim Babangida, to suspend the result. The labor strike and lawyers' strike and other signs of protest still building steam appeared to take him by surprise.President Babangida promised to turn power over to an elected civilian president on Aug. 27. He held an election for president, limited to two candidates acceptable to him, one of whom won. Others of his friends went to court to get the count suspended.
NEWS
April 23, 1992
South Africa is moving so swiftly on some fronts that its biggest need is to catch up with itself on others. Nigeria's President Ibrahim Babangida, chairman of the Organization of African Unity, welcomed South Africa's President F. W. de Klerk as "the man who closed the book on apartheid." It will be hard for any government's sanctions to remain in place long after that.But for South Africa to move into economic leadership of all Africa, its peoples have to share power with each other. And that is becoming more difficult as the violence between Xhosa-African National Congress people on one side and Zulu-Inkatha Freedom Party people on the other grows worse.
NEWS
June 18, 1993
Nigeria's election was preceded by widespread predictions that military strongman Ibrahim Babangida would not turn over power to an elected civilian on Aug. 27 as he promised. Not for nothing do Nigerians call him "The Great Maradona," after the tricky, sure-footed Argentine soccer star.So why did he wait so long? The census was held on schedule last year and counted only 88.5 million Nigerians instead of the 110 or more million estimated. The election went forward. Candidates were limited to friends of the general who are Muslims and wealthy businessmen, two of them in all.Voting took place.
NEWS
August 14, 1994
The strike in Nigeria's oil fields is curtailing production and threatening exports and foreign exchange. The bank strike in Lagos is shutting down daily commerce in the metropolis. Power and water are intermittently cut off in many neighborhoods. The price of staples is soaring.These are all political protests against the military government of General Sani Abacha for suppressing last year's presidential election and trying its undoubted winner, Moshood Abiola, for treason. It may well be the people, not the rulers, who suffer from such protests, but it is the people who are mounting them.
NEWS
July 14, 1994
Nigeria is too diverse and great a country for Gen. Sani Abacha, who seized power in November, to rule as his personal fiefdom. He pretends to have started up a constitutional process to replace the elected national legislature, state governments and local assemblies he dismantled. Actually, he is fighting the tides. Now he is taking on the oil industry work force, the source of Nigeria's wealth.It was quixotic of businessman Moshood K. O. Abiola to claim to be president of Africa's most populous country, last month, on the first anniversary of the election he won. The former strongman, Gen. Ibrahim Babangida, had suspended that vote, set up a puppet regime, then stepped down after protest by his countrymen.
NEWS
By BEN BARBER | March 14, 1993
Lagos, Nigeria. -- In a nation that has spent 23 of the 33 years since independence under military rulers, the current attempt at democratic elections has yet to convince people it will lead to civilian rule.General Ibrahim Babangida, faced with the drastic plunge of the naira in less than three years to one twentieth of its value, has presided over the crumbling of living standards even though the country pumps nearly 2 million barrels of oil per day.Nationwide strikes by civil servants unable to feed and house their families paralyzed schools for the past two months and in February shut hospitals, water, electric supplies and other public services.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 27, 1993
LAGOS, Nigeria -- Ending months of speculation, Gen. Ibrahim Babangida of Nigeria resigned yesterday and a new interim civilian leader was sworn in after eight years of military rule.Ernest Shonekan, 57, a Harvard-educated businessman, was appointed by General Babangida to head an interim government in Africa's most populous country. He had been chairman of the Transitional Council, a group created in January by the military authorities to oversee Nigeria's return to democracy.But Mr. Shonekan's commitment to democratic rule is questioned by the political opposition and even by some neutral analysts.
NEWS
August 22, 1993
Nigeria is the giant of Africa. Nigeria is a bastion of education and sophistication. Nigeria is leading the West African operation to restore civil society to Liberia. But Nigeria has trouble ruling itself. Its main obstacle is a military dictator who promised to restore democracy and went half-way and now won't follow through.The stakes are rising. It may be Nigeria, not smaller Liberia, where civil war threatens life and the pursuit of happiness. The Nigeria Labor Congress told its 3.5 million trade-union members to strike this coming Friday if President Ibrahim Babangida has not handed over power by then, the day he long promised for the turnover.
NEWS
June 30, 1993
It turned out that the people of Nigeria who voted for a president June 12 took it seriously and did not want the dictator, Ibrahim Babangida, to suspend the result. The labor strike and lawyers' strike and other signs of protest still building steam appeared to take him by surprise.President Babangida promised to turn power over to an elected civilian president on Aug. 27. He held an election for president, limited to two candidates acceptable to him, one of whom won. Others of his friends went to court to get the count suspended.
NEWS
June 18, 1993
Nigeria's election was preceded by widespread predictions that military strongman Ibrahim Babangida would not turn over power to an elected civilian on Aug. 27 as he promised. Not for nothing do Nigerians call him "The Great Maradona," after the tricky, sure-footed Argentine soccer star.So why did he wait so long? The census was held on schedule last year and counted only 88.5 million Nigerians instead of the 110 or more million estimated. The election went forward. Candidates were limited to friends of the general who are Muslims and wealthy businessmen, two of them in all.Voting took place.
NEWS
By BEN BARBER | March 14, 1993
Lagos, Nigeria. -- In a nation that has spent 23 of the 33 years since independence under military rulers, the current attempt at democratic elections has yet to convince people it will lead to civilian rule.General Ibrahim Babangida, faced with the drastic plunge of the naira in less than three years to one twentieth of its value, has presided over the crumbling of living standards even though the country pumps nearly 2 million barrels of oil per day.Nationwide strikes by civil servants unable to feed and house their families paralyzed schools for the past two months and in February shut hospitals, water, electric supplies and other public services.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | November 1, 1992
U.S. Attorney Richard D. Bennett announced the first-ever extradition of a suspected Nigerian drug dealer yesterday, after a man charged with smuggling "hundreds of millions of dollars" worth of heroin into the United States was flown to Baltimore-Washington International Airport.The man extradited, Chris Okpala, 29, was arrested in Nigeria and turned over to federal agents yesterday. A spokesman for the federal Drug Enforcement Agency said the suspect would be held at the city's central police district lockup.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | November 1, 1992
U.S. Attorney Richard D. Bennett announced the first-ever extradition of a suspected Nigerian drug dealer yesterday, after a man charged with smuggling "hundreds of millions of dollars" worth of heroin into the United States was flown to Baltimore-Washington International Airport.The man extradited, Chris Okpala, 29, was arrested in Nigeria and turned over to federal agents yesterday. A spokesman for the federal Drug Enforcement Agency said the suspect would be held at the city's central police district lockup.
NEWS
April 23, 1992
South Africa is moving so swiftly on some fronts that its biggest need is to catch up with itself on others. Nigeria's President Ibrahim Babangida, chairman of the Organization of African Unity, welcomed South Africa's President F. W. de Klerk as "the man who closed the book on apartheid." It will be hard for any government's sanctions to remain in place long after that.But for South Africa to move into economic leadership of all Africa, its peoples have to share power with each other. And that is becoming more difficult as the violence between Xhosa-African National Congress people on one side and Zulu-Inkatha Freedom Party people on the other grows worse.
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