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NEWS
May 30, 1991
Who invented AZT? Though it sounds like a superfluous game-show question, the answer is at the center of a crucial health-care dispute. Azidothymidine, or AZT, is a drug that prolongs survival for people with AIDS. It is currently being manufacturered by a British pharmaceutical firm, Burroughs Wellcome. And the cost -- $3,000 a year per person -- brings in hundreds of millions in annual revenue for the company.The problem, in practical terms, is that Burroughs Wellcome holds the patent on AZT; no other company can produce it. Barr Laboratories tried recently by asking the Food and Drug Administration for permission to produce a generic version of the drug.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 14, 2002
BARCELONA, Spain - A new study has shown that a simple and inexpensive drug given just once after birth can protect many infants from infection with the virus that causes AIDS, South African researchers reported at the 14th International AIDS Conference, which ended here Friday. In the study, babies who were given a single dose of the AIDS drug nevirapine within 24 hours after birth were no more likely to become infected with HIV than those given another drug, AZT, for the first six weeks of life.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A federal advisory panel recommended yesterday that the government approve the experimental antiviral AIDS drug DDC, but only to be used in combination with AZT, the most widely dispensed antiviral AIDS drug.The committee, which advises the Food and Drug Administration, voted against recommending approval of DDC as a single-agent treatment, even for those who cannot medically tolerate AZT or the antiviral drug DDI. It said the research did not show the drug to be effective when used alone.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - President Clinton and his South African counterpart, Thabo Mbeki, danced delicately around the issue of AIDS yesterday, agreeing to disagree on the disease's cause while moving forward on infrastructure and poverty issues that could combat AIDS indirectly. The controversy surrounding Mbeki's questions on the cause and treatment of AIDS threatened to overwhelm the South African president's first state visit to Washington since he succeeded Nelson Mandela as president last year.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Setting the stage for possible federal approval of a third antiviral AIDS drug, early findings in an ongoing study have shown that the experimental AIDS drug DDC, used in combination with AZT, produces more than twice the crucial immune system cells as does AZT used alone.The findings were presented yesterday to a Food and Drug Administration advisory panel that is expected to vote today on whether to recommend approval of DDC, which is manufactured by Hoffmann-La Roche Inc., of Nutley, N.J. Although recommendations by advisory committees are not binding, the FDA almost always follows their advice.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
A nationwide team of scientists has found that people who take the anti-AIDS drug, AZT, early in their infection not only delay symptoms but also live longer than those who wait until they are diagnosed with full-blown AIDS."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 29, 1993
Appearing to contradict recent studies showing that people infected with HIV gained scant benefit by taking the drug AZT early in the course of their infection, a new report concludes that the medication significantly slows the progression toward AIDS.But scientists familiar with all the clinical trials of AZT said the data were consistent in essential ways and that the basic message remained the same: AZT is a moderately useful drug that can slow the course of AIDS in some patients for a limited period of time, and it is up to an individual patient, consulting with a doctor on the benefits and risks of the medication, to decide when -- or even whether -- to start the anti-viral therapy.
NEWS
By Marlene Cimons and Marlene Cimons,Los Angeles Times | May 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In a move that could significantly reduce the cost of AZT, the only approved AIDS drug, the National Institutes of Health said yesterday that it had helped Burroughs Wellcome Co. develop the patented medication and wants authority to license other companies to market it.NIH Director Bernadine Healy said in a statement that the National Cancer Institute, one of the NIH's constituent research agencies, should have been named a co-inventor of...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A federally financed study has found that the drug AZT dramatically reduces the transmission of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, from infected mothers to their newborns, government health officials said yesterday.The findings were considered so significant that the study, which began in April 1991, was ordered stopped on Friday, and officials are spending the holiday weekend notifying the 59 medical centers in the United States and France participating in the study to offer AZT to the pregnant women who had been receiving a placebo.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 15, 1991
ROCKVILLE -- A new federal study has raised troubling questions about who will be helped by the AIDS drug AZT and how much.The study, which was conducted by the Department of Veterans Affairs, found that AZT, or azidothymidine, slowed the development of symptoms in some people infected with the AIDS virus, yet people who took the drug before they had developed symptoms lived no longer than those who took it after they showed symptoms.In addition, the researchers found that black and Hispanic patients showed little slowing in the development of symptoms.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1984: Great American Smokeout1985: Liner Achille Lauro is hijacked1985: Titanic wreck is found1987: AZT is approvedPub Date: 12/08/99
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Diana Sugg and Scott Shane and Diana Sugg,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1999
American and Ugandan researchers have found that an inexpensive drug can dramatically reduce the chance that a mother will pass the AIDS virus to her baby, a discovery that could save the lives of as many as 1,000 newborns a day in the Third World. The study, directed by Dr. Brooks Jackson of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and a Ugandan obstetrician, was hailed yesterday as a breakthrough in the search for an affordable weapon against AIDS in developing countries ravaged by the disease.
NEWS
June 15, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Chicago Tribune, which was published Saturday.IN SUB-Saharan Africa, AIDS remains deadlier than any plague or natural catastrophe anyone can recall.Of the estimated 34 million people worldwide infected with the AIDS virus, about 22 million live in that part of the world.Such a calamity cries out for action, which in some Third World countries has included proposals to allow native manufacturers to pirate AIDS drugs developed by Western firms to produce lower-priced generics.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1998
A headline in yesterday's editions incorrectly characterized the results of an AIDS drug trial in Thailand. The trial was completed, not cut short.The Sun regrets the error.The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced yesterday that a short course of the drug AZT sharply reduced transmission of the AIDS virus from mothers to babies in a Thailand experiment -- offering hope to impoverished countries that cannot offer expensive therapies.The finding could end months of rancorous debate over the ethics of medical trials in the Third World, in which U.S. researchers provide the anti-AIDS drug to some women and placebos to others.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1997
Denying they are succumbing to criticism that they are repeating mistakes of the Tuskegee experiments, Johns Hopkins and federal health officials said yesterday that they might drop -- placebos from an AIDS prevention trial to be held in Ethiopia next year.Marc Kusinitz, a spokesman for the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, said the placebo segment of the study will be abandoned. He said the decision was based on preliminary evidence from a study in Thailand showing benefits of an experimental therapy.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | September 25, 1997
BOSTON -- Imagine if it were happening here. Imagine if our government were sponsoring research in the poorest pockets of our country where masses of pregnant women are infected with HIV.The researchers know that AZT could save many of their babies from being born infected. Without AZT one in four babies is infected by the mother, with it only one in 10.But AZT is expensive, $1,000 a mother as it is prescribed now, and the need for a cheaper regimen is critical. So with the best of motives, they set up a study to see if lower, less costly doses are as good as higher doses.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | October 10, 1991
Federal approval of a new drug that slows the progression of AIDS but does not cure the disease was greeted today with a mixture of applause and reservation by specialists at Johns Hopkins Hospital and the University of Maryland Medical Center.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration yesterday licensed dideoxyinosine, or DDI, which acts like AZT."It's wonderful to have another drug for this disease -- because it's an awful disease -- however, it's kind of an approval in a vacuum," said Dr. Judith Feinberg, an AIDS researcher at Hopkins.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration has approved the antiviral AIDS drug DDC, but only to be used in combination with AZT, the most widely prescribed AIDS antiviral therapy.Also known as dideoxycytidine and zalcitabine, DDC is the third AIDS antiviral drug to be licensed since 1987, when AZT was approved. Last fall, the FDA approved the antiviral DDI.Antiviral drugs are considered the major tools in the fight against AIDS because they attack the underlying viral condition, rather than the individual infections and other illnesses that result from a damaged immune system.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1997
A consumer health organization is accusing the Johns Hopkins University and other U.S. research institutions of violating international rules of ethics by withholding proven AIDS treatments from women and children in overseas experiments.Public Citizen Health Research charged that nine federally funded experiments could cause about 1,000 newborns in Africa, Asia and the Caribbean to die needlessly. Six of the studies are under Hopkins supervision."It's Tuskegee Part Two, and this time many more people will die," said Dr. Sidney Wolfe, director of the Washington-based advocacy group.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- After years of recommending AZT as the first-line drug for treating the virus that causes AIDS, federal health officials are considering a change because of results with other drugs.A large study paid for by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and reported last week found that AZT was less effective than another drug, didanosine (ddI), and also less effective than combinations of AZT with either ddI or zalcitabine (ddC).One part of the study showed that ddI lowered the rate of death from HIV infection to 5 percent from 10 percent, compared with the use of AZT alone over 147 weeks.
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