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By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2012
The leaves on my azaleas are turning white. They look dirty underneath, too. How can I stop this? Your azaleas are infested with lace bugs. These ubiquitous insects insert their mouth parts into leaf undersides and suck out the chlorophyll. Each piercing makes a pale spot, known as stippling, and eventually the entire leaf can turn yellow and fall off. The black dots under the leaves are fecal spots. Lace bugs themselves are hard to see because they have translucent "lacy" wings.
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By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Nothing says "Surprise!" like an Australian rapper with three Top 10 songs currently on the Billboard Hot 100. Last night, Iggy Azalea - the 24-year-old pop-rap artist responsible for the inescapable hit "Fancy" - performed a surprise five-song set at Horseshoe Casino Baltimore's three-level bar, 14Forty, to celebrate the casino's opening.  She was not the only surprise. Gladys Knight took the stage for a 45-minute set as the doors opened at 9 p.m., and Pauly D, of "Jersey Shore" fame, DJ'd a 90-minute set as well.  Noah Hirsch, vice president of marketing for the Horseshoe, said it took a "good group of team members" to keep the surprises a secret.
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
I'm afraid I have poison sumac at the edge of my lawn and that in the fall its red berries will spread it. Doesn't it sucker, too? What should I do? Poison sumac is fairly uncommon. It is a sparse shrub that looks like a young ash tree and grows in swampy, wet areas. In most of Maryland, these areas have been drained. Now poison sumac occurs primarily on the Eastern Shore. It's very unlikely you have poison sumac. Berries are key to identification. Poison sumac has white or pale yellow berries in clusters.
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
I'm afraid I have poison sumac at the edge of my lawn and that in the fall its red berries will spread it. Doesn't it sucker, too? What should I do? Poison sumac is fairly uncommon. It is a sparse shrub that looks like a young ash tree and grows in swampy, wet areas. In most of Maryland, these areas have been drained. Now poison sumac occurs primarily on the Eastern Shore. It's very unlikely you have poison sumac. Berries are key to identification. Poison sumac has white or pale yellow berries in clusters.
NEWS
August 1, 1999
Q. While watering my azaleas this summer I've noticed small, white, fuzzy things sitting at the spot where the twigs are joined. Recently, I've seen a strange black coating on some leaves. What's going on? Is this cause for alarm?A. Those fuzzy things are the egg sacs of azalea bark scale. Tiny nymphs left the egg sacs in June and then began feeding on your azalea leaves. The black coating is sooty mold, a harmless fungus that grows on the plant sap excreted by the scale.If you see a large number of egg sacs and if there is leaf yellowing, spray your azaleas with a dormant oil this fall to kill overwintering nymphs.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | April 13, 2003
It's not spring -- not really -- until the azaleas bloom. But when they do, it's an explosion of color and drama, like the grand finale in a Wagnerian opera. Lavender, mauve, pink, white, orange, scarlet, and yellow, they froth through woodlands, light up lawns, and offer breathtaking color along the highways. "Seeing them in the wild with mountains in the background is like heaven," says Donald Hyatt, president of the Potomac chapter of the Azalea Society of America. Hyatt, who owns Stonehouse Creek Nursery in McLean, Va., fell in love with azaleas as a child when he first saw the deciduous varieties at the National Arboretum.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | April 24, 2005
Forget daffodils and robins. It isn't really spring in Maryland until the azaleas bloom. While they're sometimes called the "royalty of the garden," azaleas are not so much dignified queens as fairy princesses tripping through the woodlands and across shade-dappled lawns in frothy lavender, mauve, pink, white, apricot, crimson and butter yellow dresses. "They only last a few weeks," notes Jane Baldwin, president of the Cylburn Arboretum Association, "but they are absolutely gorgeous." All azaleas are rhododendrons (though not all rhododendrons are azaleas)
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By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2002
Three hundred and sixty-four days of the year, the lavish gated garden on Baltimore Avenue in Towson belongs to Robert M. Evans. Whenever he wants, Evans, whose publishing office opens onto the garden, can sit on the spacious flagstone terrace, watch for signs of cardinals and otherwise soak in his verdant oasis in the middle of an ordinary business district. The private garden is his in the winter, when the slightest shimmer of ice coats magnolia branches, in the spring, when pale pink weeping cherry petals waft into the reflecting pool, and in the summer and fall, when pots of vinca and geranium framing the ornate wrought iron-topped gazebo overflow with color.
FEATURES
August 9, 2008
Living a stone's throw from a railroad track in Relay, Ray and Diana Chism have surrounded their historic home with boxwoods, roses, azaleas and other flowering perennials. You can see their garden at baltimoresun.com/gardener.
NEWS
May 17, 1992
Not too late to plantThis is a special time of year, when most azaleas are in full bloom, turning parks, roadsides and home gardens into a kaleidoscope of unmatchable color.Although spring and early fall -- before October -- are the best planting seasons for azaleas, it's not too late to add some of the colorful shrubs to your yard, said Raymond Bosmans, a horticulturist with the Home & Garden Information Center of the Cooperative Extension Service, Maryland Institute for Agriculture and Natural Resources.
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
My azaleas are so big that they're growing above my kitchen windowsills. I know you're not supposed to prune until after they bloom in spring, but I can't wait that long. Will I ruin these shrubs by pruning now? It's best to wait, because late season pruning can stimulate your shrubs to produce new shoots. This uses up the plants' stored energy and makes it harder for them to prepare for winter survival. Also, the new shoots may not have time to mature and harden for winter, which risks killing them.
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By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2012
The leaves on my azaleas are turning white. They look dirty underneath, too. How can I stop this? Your azaleas are infested with lace bugs. These ubiquitous insects insert their mouth parts into leaf undersides and suck out the chlorophyll. Each piercing makes a pale spot, known as stippling, and eventually the entire leaf can turn yellow and fall off. The black dots under the leaves are fecal spots. Lace bugs themselves are hard to see because they have translucent "lacy" wings.
TRAVEL
May 17, 2009
My husband and I live in Catonsville, and in April, we visited Charleston, S.C. We were amazed by the beauty of the bright azaleas, the hanging Spanish moss and the bald cypresses growing out of the water. This photograph captures all three wonders on display at Magnolia Plantation and Gardens, a historic site dating back to 1676. Spring had sprung, and this was our best shot. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should have been taken within the past year and be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture and your name, address and phone number.
FEATURES
August 9, 2008
Living a stone's throw from a railroad track in Relay, Ray and Diana Chism have surrounded their historic home with boxwoods, roses, azaleas and other flowering perennials. You can see their garden at baltimoresun.com/gardener.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | December 15, 2007
The lower leaves of my new Encore azalea are turning brownish. Is this variety partly deciduous, or do I have a disease problem? The plant was healthy all spring and summer and bloomed well. Healthy evergreen azaleas often exhibit color change in fall and winter. Depending on variety and site conditions, colors range from purple-reds to yellow-greens. They can be quite attractive in the winter landscape. Azaleas normally drop a few leaves in the fall, but the majority remain and green up in plenty of time for spring floral displays.
NEWS
November 11, 2005
Some suburbanites are heading into the city in growing numbers, but they aren't the ones the Chamber of Commerce - or urban gardeners - will welcome with open arms. The white-tailed deer staking claims in Baltimore are a prime example of creative adaptation to Maryland's changing landscape as well as a hearty challenge to the two-legged residents. But we expect they can adapt, too. These next few weeks, though, are the most challenging of the year. "The rut," as experts put it, has begun, with bucks chasing does, vehicles and even their own reflections in plate-glass windows; the successful ones will soon settle down to creating fawns.
NEWS
By DENNIS BISHOP and DENNIS BISHOP,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2001
Q. I generally plant my annual flowers in early May, but I was very busy this spring and have not had an opportunity to plant them. Is it too late to plant annual flowers? What can I do to ensure that they thrive? A. With some extra care, you can still grow some nice annuals to add color to your late summer and early fall garden. Annuals grow best when they are able to establish roots before the stress of the hot summer months. When planted late, they miss this opportunity and need to be nursed along.
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | May 25, 1997
Azaleas worked hard, deserve attentionNow that your azaleas have finished blooming, it's time to take care of any pruning they may need. It's also a good time to fertilize, although azaleas aren't, as David Clement of the Home and Garden Information Center says, "really nutrient hungry." If you do fertilize, use a granular fertilizer made for acid-loving plants such as Hollytone. And don't overdo it. Azaleas have a shallow root system, which too much fertilizer can damage.Azaleas also benefit from mulching this time of year.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | May 22, 2005
Now that my rhododendrons and azaleas are over, I have no shrubs flowering until next spring. What shrubs would you suggest that bloom in summer, besides the usual hydrangeas and butterfly bushes? Good possibilities include: abelia, some native azaleas (highly fragrant), bottlebrush buckeye, small crape myrtles, potentilla, rose of Sharon (try sterile varieties that won't seed everywhere), and summersweet (Clethra alnifolia -- wonderfully fragrant). Several roses will repeat bloom or bloom lightly all summer.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | April 24, 2005
Forget daffodils and robins. It isn't really spring in Maryland until the azaleas bloom. While they're sometimes called the "royalty of the garden," azaleas are not so much dignified queens as fairy princesses tripping through the woodlands and across shade-dappled lawns in frothy lavender, mauve, pink, white, apricot, crimson and butter yellow dresses. "They only last a few weeks," notes Jane Baldwin, president of the Cylburn Arboretum Association, "but they are absolutely gorgeous." All azaleas are rhododendrons (though not all rhododendrons are azaleas)
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