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NEWS
December 2, 1998
The Orange County Register said in an editorial Saturday:AFTER learning that the U. S. Postal Service will feature author Ayn Rand on a commemorative postage stamp, we were struck by this irony: A woman who wrote about the way bureaucracies stifle freedom and individualism is honored by a quasi-governmental agency defined by the very tendencies she railed against. All the same, the Postal Service deserves accolades for recognizing Ms. Rand's accomplishments.An author of noteRand, a Russian immigrant who wrote such influential books as "Atlas Shrugged," "The Fountainhead" and "We the Living," is the 16th author commemorated as part of the Postal Service's literary arts series.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | July 10, 2013
The 19 firefighters who died battling a huge wildfire near Prescott, Ariz., presumably were motivated by something other than rational self-interest. Like the first responders to 9/11 and other emergencies, and members of the armed forces, those firefighters put themselves in harm's way (or chose a job that did so) because they wanted to serve. Economics, and much of public policy and political strategy, assume that people are motivated by self-interest, that the definition of acting rationally is to maximize what you want for yourself, and that other values -- service, duty, allegiance to others, morality and shared ideals -- are either irrelevant or negligible.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Jenkins and By Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | February 16, 2003
At the close of the last century, Modern Library, the prestige publisher, announced its list of the 100 best novels of the 100 years, as chosen by a panel of top writers and scholars. Not a single work by Ayn Rand made the list. Then, turning the contest into a national parlor game, Modern Library invited ordinary readers to submit their choices. A quarter of a million responded, and presto! Rand's magnum opus, Atlas Shrugged, scored No. 1, and three more Rand novels appeared in the top 10. This news might have brought a contemptuous smile to Ayn Rand's stony face, but for one thing: Her chief competitor was L. Ron Hubbard, who landed three titles on the public's top 10. Hubbard, a marginal writer of science fiction, founded Scientology.
NEWS
August 18, 2012
It has been fairly well established that Mitt Romney is not a regular guy and doesn't have very many convictions. He is the type of guy who has a Swiss bank account, enjoys firing people and was for almost everything before he was against it. No he has added Rep. Paul Ryan to the ticket. Mr. Ryan is just a regular guy with steadfast convictions on budget-cutting and smaller government. These are the principal attributes that the GOP has identified as making him the perfect counterpart for Mr. Romney.
NEWS
August 18, 2012
It has been fairly well established that Mitt Romney is not a regular guy and doesn't have very many convictions. He is the type of guy who has a Swiss bank account, enjoys firing people and was for almost everything before he was against it. No he has added Rep. Paul Ryan to the ticket. Mr. Ryan is just a regular guy with steadfast convictions on budget-cutting and smaller government. These are the principal attributes that the GOP has identified as making him the perfect counterpart for Mr. Romney.
NEWS
October 4, 2006
LARRY DONALD DOUGHTY, 69, husband of Linda Morlok Doughty and a resident of Belle Haven, passed Saturday, September 30, 2006 at Shore Memorial Hospital in Nassawadox, VA. A native of Chester, PA, he was the son of the late Clarence Edward Doughty and the late Goldie Doughty Frees. Mr. Doughty was a retired Deputy Director of the Technology Directorate, U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD. He developed and operated the Holiday Tree Farm in Aberdeen, MD. and was a student of Ayn Rand's Philosophy, Objectivism.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Norah Vincent and Norah Vincent,Special to the Sun | February 23, 2003
Getting It Right, by William F. Buckley Jr. Regnery. 320 pages. $24.95. One likes to think that William F. Buckley Jr. is indulging in an arid jest with himself and us when he writes a historical novel in which he -- not Buckley qua narrator, mind you, but Buckley qua historical figure and godfather of modern conservatism -- appears as one of the characters. But if conjuring this driest of dry humors was indeed Buckley's intention in Getting It Right, either he has fallen considerably short of his objective, or he has pulled off a self-satire so highly pitched that only dogs can hear it. Buckley's latest foray into fiction, a love story set against the backdrop of the early days of the Cold War and the rise of the conservative movement in the late 1950s and early 1960s, does poke its share of fun, but only at some of Buckley's erstwhile intellectual and political foils, most notably objectivist novelist / philosopher Ayn Rand, her protege lover Nathaniel Branden, John Birch Society founder Robert Welch and rabid anticommunist activist Major General Edwin A. Walker, all of whom appear as characters in the novel.
NEWS
By Lisa Schwarzbaum and Lisa Schwarzbaum,special to the sun | January 19, 1997
"Sewer, Gas & Electric," by Matt Ruff. Atlantic Monthly Press, 528 pages, $23.In Matt Ruff's not-too-distant future (we're talking 2023 here, long after the African Pandemic of '04 has wiped out all the black people on earth except those with green eyes), civilization will be a stew of pop culture references, giant corporations and crumbling urban infrastructures.Donald Trump will have left the stage (burned in Cape Canaveral launch pad fire while he was attempting to be the first Martian billionaire)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Tucker and Ken Tucker,Special to the Sun | November 23, 2003
Old School, by Tobias Wolff. Knopf. 198 pages. $22. Tobias Wolff is the author of numerous collections of exemplary short stories as well as the celebrated memoir This Boy's Life. Wolff is a master of reverie, avoiding sentimentality in favor of clarity and the sorts of truths that can sting, particularly in the matter of fathers and sons. Old School is his first novel, and it's written in the form of a memoir -- that of an aging scholar looking back over his life -- but you never get the sense that Wolff is trading on the residual affection any reader might hold for This Boy's Life.
NEWS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS and JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS,SUN REPORTER | February 12, 2006
It's not too hard to find someone who would say - apologetically, perhaps - that capitalism is the most practical economic system. But the most moral? That's the argument Andrew Bernstein makes. The philosophy professor - author of The Capitalist Manifesto: The Historic, Economic and Philosophic Case for Laissez-Faire, published in September - defends and celebrates capitalism as "the system of freedom." He is an objectivist, a follower of the individualistic philosophy created by Ayn Rand, best known for the novels Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2011
Nearly two years ago, performer Kel Millionie played the title role in an aerial drama about Icarus, who flew too close to the sun on wings made of wax. They melted, plunging the young man into the sea. Using trapezes, harnesses and aerial cloths, Millionie and eight other performers from Daydreams & Nightmares Aerial Theatre explored the story of what happened to the mythical Greek youth after his precipitous plunge. Millionie didn't realize that he himself was about to take his own trip to the bottom of the ocean.
NEWS
May 21, 2010
I am an admirer of the author Ayn Rand. I understand her treatises on free enterprise. I don't agree with all her applications. This brings me to Rand Paul. I am certain it is no coincidence that his father, the Libertarian candidate for president, named his son Rand. The rub is that many of these devotees of her philosophy blindly follow her advice no matter what the particulars. The particulars now are Rand Paul's statements regarding the Civil Rights act of 1964. First, he said he would have preferred to eliminate the clause pertaining to public accommodations.
NEWS
October 4, 2006
LARRY DONALD DOUGHTY, 69, husband of Linda Morlok Doughty and a resident of Belle Haven, passed Saturday, September 30, 2006 at Shore Memorial Hospital in Nassawadox, VA. A native of Chester, PA, he was the son of the late Clarence Edward Doughty and the late Goldie Doughty Frees. Mr. Doughty was a retired Deputy Director of the Technology Directorate, U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD. He developed and operated the Holiday Tree Farm in Aberdeen, MD. and was a student of Ayn Rand's Philosophy, Objectivism.
NEWS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS and JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS,SUN REPORTER | February 12, 2006
It's not too hard to find someone who would say - apologetically, perhaps - that capitalism is the most practical economic system. But the most moral? That's the argument Andrew Bernstein makes. The philosophy professor - author of The Capitalist Manifesto: The Historic, Economic and Philosophic Case for Laissez-Faire, published in September - defends and celebrates capitalism as "the system of freedom." He is an objectivist, a follower of the individualistic philosophy created by Ayn Rand, best known for the novels Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Tucker and Ken Tucker,Special to the Sun | November 23, 2003
Old School, by Tobias Wolff. Knopf. 198 pages. $22. Tobias Wolff is the author of numerous collections of exemplary short stories as well as the celebrated memoir This Boy's Life. Wolff is a master of reverie, avoiding sentimentality in favor of clarity and the sorts of truths that can sting, particularly in the matter of fathers and sons. Old School is his first novel, and it's written in the form of a memoir -- that of an aging scholar looking back over his life -- but you never get the sense that Wolff is trading on the residual affection any reader might hold for This Boy's Life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Norah Vincent and Norah Vincent,Special to the Sun | February 23, 2003
Getting It Right, by William F. Buckley Jr. Regnery. 320 pages. $24.95. One likes to think that William F. Buckley Jr. is indulging in an arid jest with himself and us when he writes a historical novel in which he -- not Buckley qua narrator, mind you, but Buckley qua historical figure and godfather of modern conservatism -- appears as one of the characters. But if conjuring this driest of dry humors was indeed Buckley's intention in Getting It Right, either he has fallen considerably short of his objective, or he has pulled off a self-satire so highly pitched that only dogs can hear it. Buckley's latest foray into fiction, a love story set against the backdrop of the early days of the Cold War and the rise of the conservative movement in the late 1950s and early 1960s, does poke its share of fun, but only at some of Buckley's erstwhile intellectual and political foils, most notably objectivist novelist / philosopher Ayn Rand, her protege lover Nathaniel Branden, John Birch Society founder Robert Welch and rabid anticommunist activist Major General Edwin A. Walker, all of whom appear as characters in the novel.
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS | May 23, 1993
"I do not recognize anyone's right to one minute of my life. Nor to any part of my energy. Nor to any achievement of mine. . . I am a man who does not exist for others."With that angry soliloquy by Howard Roark in "The Fountainhead," Ayn Rand forever changed the face of American architecture.Her epic characterization of Roark -- the fictional architect who dynamites his own building halfway through construction because others drastically compromised his design -- may have done more to shape public opinion about architecture and those who practice it than decades worth of actual construction.
NEWS
May 21, 2010
I am an admirer of the author Ayn Rand. I understand her treatises on free enterprise. I don't agree with all her applications. This brings me to Rand Paul. I am certain it is no coincidence that his father, the Libertarian candidate for president, named his son Rand. The rub is that many of these devotees of her philosophy blindly follow her advice no matter what the particulars. The particulars now are Rand Paul's statements regarding the Civil Rights act of 1964. First, he said he would have preferred to eliminate the clause pertaining to public accommodations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Jenkins and By Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | February 16, 2003
At the close of the last century, Modern Library, the prestige publisher, announced its list of the 100 best novels of the 100 years, as chosen by a panel of top writers and scholars. Not a single work by Ayn Rand made the list. Then, turning the contest into a national parlor game, Modern Library invited ordinary readers to submit their choices. A quarter of a million responded, and presto! Rand's magnum opus, Atlas Shrugged, scored No. 1, and three more Rand novels appeared in the top 10. This news might have brought a contemptuous smile to Ayn Rand's stony face, but for one thing: Her chief competitor was L. Ron Hubbard, who landed three titles on the public's top 10. Hubbard, a marginal writer of science fiction, founded Scientology.
NEWS
December 2, 1998
The Orange County Register said in an editorial Saturday:AFTER learning that the U. S. Postal Service will feature author Ayn Rand on a commemorative postage stamp, we were struck by this irony: A woman who wrote about the way bureaucracies stifle freedom and individualism is honored by a quasi-governmental agency defined by the very tendencies she railed against. All the same, the Postal Service deserves accolades for recognizing Ms. Rand's accomplishments.An author of noteRand, a Russian immigrant who wrote such influential books as "Atlas Shrugged," "The Fountainhead" and "We the Living," is the 16th author commemorated as part of the Postal Service's literary arts series.
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