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By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
Ayers Saint Gross, a Baltimore-based architecture and planning firm, has been hired to recommend ways to redevelop the former Chrysler automobile assembly plant in Newark, Del. The University of Delaware acquired the 272-acre property and plans to replace it with a high-tech campus for research, business and academics as an extension of its main campus in Newark. The university has asked Ayers Saint Gross to develop a vision for the Chrysler site and how it could fit with the rest of the university's real estate holdings.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 15, 2014
First, let me acknowledge the following: The Baltimore harbor is still too polluted, too many Baltimoreans still throw too much trash in the street; we need better results from the city's public schools and more involved parents of school-age kids; we need to lower property taxes; we need to better support city businesses; we need to foster healthy morale and principled duty among teachers, firefighters and police officers, and they need to be adequately...
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Over the past 35 years, Baltimore architect Glenn Birx has nurtured a global career without having to leave the firm he started at in 1978. At Ayers Saint Gross, Birx has had the opportunity to work on projects as diverse as the construction of a hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and the transformation of ruins in the ancient walled city of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, into a museum. "There's always new things to learn," said Birx, Ayers Saint Gross' chief operating officer. Not only do his projects offer variety, but the business itself is also constantly changing, offering new challenges: "The way we did buildings in 1978 is completely different from the way we do buildings in 2013.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
When Beechfield Elementary/Middle School fifth-graders were asked to design their dream homes 15 years ago, they almost always included a "safe room," a place where they could escape violence, according to Ayers Saint Gross president Jim Wheeler. Today, none do. Their dream houses have video game rooms and swimming pools. It's a particularly gratifying shift for the architects volunteering in the West Baltimore public school to see. "One day, we'll hire one of these students," Wheeler said.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
When Beechfield Elementary/Middle School fifth-graders were asked to design their dream homes 15 years ago, they almost always included a "safe room," a place where they could escape violence, according to Ayers Saint Gross president Jim Wheeler. Today, none do. Their dream houses have video game rooms and swimming pools. It's a particularly gratifying shift for the architects volunteering in the West Baltimore public school to see. "One day, we'll hire one of these students," Wheeler said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | March 5, 2000
When Adam Gross moved to Baltimore in 1984 to help revive an old-guard architectural firm, he was eager to take on a wide range of commissions. Today, as design principal of the company, he is turning down many of the assignments he might have accepted 16 years ago. Yet his firm, now called Ayers Saint Gross, is as busy as ever. Billings are up. The staff is expanding. The company is increasingly becoming known as a "national" firm, with more work outside Maryland than in. All this growth is fueled by Ayers Saint Gross' decision to specialize in one area: design work for colleges and universities.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2011
Adam Gross surveys the grassy quadrangle, surrounded by brick walking paths trimmed in marble, nary a car in sight. "This is one of those seminal shots," he says, taking in the view of the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus. "This used to be all asphalt. " If Gross sounds like a proud papa, well, he is. Baltimore's most prestigious university looked a lot different — a lot junkier in Gross' view — before his firm, Ayers Saint Gross, got its hands on the master plan in 2001.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts | December 30, 1990
THUMBS UP Fidelity and Guaranty Life Insurance Co. headquarters, Peterson and Brickbauer and Emery Roth & Sons: 44TC breakthrough effort to reinvigorate the glass box.Japanese sculpture studio for the Maryland Institute, College of Art, RTKL Associates: A serendipitous project that proves architecture can be significant without being permanent.100 HarborView Drive, Columbia Design Collective, Vlastimil Koubek and Sasaki Associates: At last, a decent residential tower for the Inner Harbor.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
The Baltimore Development Corp. has selected a group headed by Ayers Saint Gross Inc. of Baltimore to develop preliminary designs for converting the former Hecht Co. department store at Howard and Lexington streets to a headquarters for the Baltimore Police Department.The Architectural and Engineering Awards Commission approved the firm's selection over 10 other groups last week. Baltimore Development Corp. now will negotiate a contract with Ayers Saint Gross to provide a preliminary design for the conversion.
NEWS
By GADI DECHTER and GADI DECHTER,SUN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
A Baltimore architectural firm was honored this week for its master plan of the Homewood campus of the Johns Hopkins University, more than five years after the plan was developed. Ayers Saint Gross received the annual Excellence in Planning for an Established Campus prize, which is awarded jointly by the Society for College and University Planning and the American Institute of Architects. The award acknowledges not only a plan's design but also the success of its implementation. Since Hopkins adopted the master plan in early 2001, the fast pace of construction on the Charles Village campus has closely followed Ayers Saint Gross' development road map, said Luanne Greene, who directs the firm's campus planning.
NEWS
November 29, 2013
Dan Rodricks is firing on all cylinders again in his recent column championing the idea that the Inner Harbor should not just be a tourist attraction and something that the city can squeeze ever more revenue out of but something that becomes a part of city dwellers' lives ("A remade Inner Harbor should be for locals," Nov. 24). When it truly is a part of city dwellers' lives, the tourists will follow. Memo to City Hall: The ultimate viability of the city lies with its livability factor, not with its tourist attractions.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 23, 2013
Be honest: You don't go to the Inner Harbor as much as you think you do. You go when you have visitors from out of town. You go when there's a big event, such as last year's Star-Spangled Sailabration, with all those tall ships and the Blue Angels. You might go during the holidays, or when your company springs for a dinner cruise. Even people who live or work within easy walking distance of the harbor don't get there as much as they think they do. Have I got that about right?
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Over the past 35 years, Baltimore architect Glenn Birx has nurtured a global career without having to leave the firm he started at in 1978. At Ayers Saint Gross, Birx has had the opportunity to work on projects as diverse as the construction of a hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and the transformation of ruins in the ancient walled city of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, into a museum. "There's always new things to learn," said Birx, Ayers Saint Gross' chief operating officer. Not only do his projects offer variety, but the business itself is also constantly changing, offering new challenges: "The way we did buildings in 1978 is completely different from the way we do buildings in 2013.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
City leaders hope that by this time next year they'll have returned from Annapolis with funds to put toward making the Inner Harbor what its original designers intended it to be - "a playground for Baltimoreans. " "The city has changed so much since the original development of the Inner Harbor," said Laurie Schwartz, executive director of the Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore Inc., a nonprofit that manages and advocates for the city's waterfront. It's time to evaluate the Inner Harbor and decide what needs to be done to sustain it as a vibrant part of the city, she said.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
The Baltimore design firm that helped ferry a Caesars-led proposal for a casino on Russell Street through the state approval process has been dropped from the project and replaced with an out-of-state company. Ayers Saint Gross, headquartered in Locust Point, drew up the preliminary designs for the Harrah's casino that were used by Caesars as an enticement for the Maryland Video Lottery Facilities Location Commission to green light the construction of a casino near M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
August 11, 2011
I am writing in regard to Childs Walker 's excellent article ("Campus visionaries," Aug. 9) that described some of the planning work our firm did for the Johns Hopkins University. While we certainly appreciate the kudos our firm received in the article, we would be remiss if we did not point out that the evolution of the campus has been a team effort which included many other talented consultants including RK&K Engineers, Mahan Rykiel Landscape Architects, and Michael Vergason Landscape Architects.
NEWS
August 11, 2011
I am writing in regard to Childs Walker 's excellent article ("Campus visionaries," Aug. 9) that described some of the planning work our firm did for the Johns Hopkins University. While we certainly appreciate the kudos our firm received in the article, we would be remiss if we did not point out that the evolution of the campus has been a team effort which included many other talented consultants including RK&K Engineers, Mahan Rykiel Landscape Architects, and Michael Vergason Landscape Architects.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2011
Adam Gross surveys the grassy quadrangle, surrounded by brick walking paths trimmed in marble, nary a car in sight. "This is one of those seminal shots," he says, taking in the view of the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus. "This used to be all asphalt. " If Gross sounds like a proud papa, well, he is. Baltimore's most prestigious university looked a lot different — a lot junkier in Gross' view — before his firm, Ayers Saint Gross, got its hands on the master plan in 2001.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2011
Five Maryland-based architecture firms are on the short list of teams vying to serve as lead designer for the $24 million renovation and modernization of the Baltimore Museum of Art , museum officials said Tuesday. On the list are firms headed by Ayers Saint Gross, Design Collective, GWWO, RTKL Associates and Ziger/Snead. The project architect will be selected by early May and improvements will be completed in phases over the next three years. Museum trustees have said they would consider only Maryland-based design firms to lead the project.
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