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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 25, 1997
TEHRAN, Iran -- Some have called him the Ayatollah Gorbachev. He is no typical Iranian mullah.Aides and acquaintances say his idea of light reading -- three hours a day -- is philosophers Immanuel Kant and Rene Descartes. He regularly browses through Western newspapers and magazines, has lived abroad, speaks German and English in addition to his native Farsi and has written extensively on the topic of reconciling Islam to the modern world.Oh yes, he plays Ping-Pong, too. Such is the unusual biography of the 54-year-old liberal scholar -- who claims to be descended from the Prophet Mohammed -- whom Iranians have chosen to be the seventh president of their Islamic republic.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | December 4, 2012
Ayatollahs seem to just appoint themselves and then start enforcing their own brand of orthodoxy. Grover Norquist has been doing that in the Republican Party for years. Mr. Norquist has never been elected to anything. Nobody ever said he should be in charge of the GOP's true religion (although he claims President Ronald Reagan urged him to found his lobbying group, Americans for Tax Reform). But he certainly has been the Republicans' key political theologian who made opposition to tax increases the party's central tenet for more than 25 years.
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NEWS
February 11, 2007
Iran's supreme leader was speaking to a gathering of air force commanders, warning of the consequences should the United States attack his country. ?The enemy knows well that any invasion would be followed by a comprehensive reaction to the invaders and their interests all over the world.? Ayatollah Ali Khamenei
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,Sun Foreign Reporter | July 29, 2007
Jerusalem -- Educated in England and now a specialist in Iranian affairs living in Israel, Iranian-born Meir Javedanfar is the co-author of a new book about Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the radical president of Iran. The Nuclear Sphinx of Tehran: Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and the State of Iran, which Javedanfar wrote with Israeli journalist Yossi Melman, is one of the first books to explore the president's early life, his political and personal influences and his nuclear ambitions. As an Iranian-born Jew, Javedanfar is irked by the 50-year-old president's threats to 'wipe Israel off the map" and finds his repeated denials of the Holocaust are disturbing.
FEATURES
February 14, 2006
Feb. 14 1895: Oscar Wilde's final play, The Importance of Being Earnest, opened at the St. James's Theatre in London. 1920: The League of Women Voters was founded in Chicago. 1989: Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini called on Muslims to kill Salman Rushdie, author of The Satanic Verses.
NEWS
January 27, 1997
Werner Aspenstrom,78, the poet who resigned from the academy that chooses the Nobel literature prize winner amid a controversy over Salman Rushdie, has died, the Swedish news agency TT reported Saturday in Stockholm, Sweden. The news agency gave no details.In 1989, he was one of three members to resign from the Swedish Academy. His two colleagues said they quit to protest the academy's weak response to the death order that Iran's Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini issued against Mr. Rushdie. The ayatollah called Mr. Rushdie's novel, "The Satanic Verses," blasphemous to Islam.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- While defending his decision to meet last week with Salman Rushdie, President Clinton insisted yesterday that he "meant no disrespect" to the Muslim world and emphasized that he had spent only "a couple of minutes" with the author at the White House.He acknowledged yesterday that some of his advisers had recommended against his meeting Mr. Rushdie, whose book "The Satanic Verses" has been condemned as blasphemous throughout the Islamic world.After its publication in 1989, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini of Iran issued a death warrant against Mr. Rushdie, which the Iranian religious leadership has refused to lift since the ayatollah's death.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | March 15, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - Here's one of the most fascinating news bites of recent days: A group of Iraqi Christians in San Diego has launched an online petition to nominate Iraq's top Shiite Muslim cleric for the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize. They've gathered 6,000 signatures so far. If Iraq does pull through its troubles and establish representative government - and if Iraqi elections do inspire other Arab publics - prime credit will be due this elderly cleric who hardly ever leaves his study. The frail, white-bearded Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani has single-handedly prevented civil war from exploding in his country.
NEWS
May 29, 1997
IRANIAN VOTERS last weekend chose Mohammad Khatami, a relative liberal, as president by a 3-1 margin over the candidate favored by clergy who run the country. It was a breathtaking call for more rights for women and more civil liberties.But it was not a repudiation of the Islamic revolution of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini that swept the West out of Iran and Iran out of the West in 1979. No such option was given voters. Only four candidates approved by the Council of Guardians appeared on the ballot.
NEWS
December 11, 1993
Alice TullyDonor of concert hallNEW YORK -- Alice Tully, who devoted her life to music and gave New York the concert hall that bears her name, died yesterday in her apartment overlooking Central Park. She was 91.Miss Tully, who suffered a stroke two years ago, had become ill Monday with a fever, said her lawyer, James McGarry.Born to wealth, she pursued a singing career in her youth as a dramatic soprano, performing in Europe and the United States between the world wars.She came forward, at first anonymously, with most of the $4.5 million it took to build a chamber music recital hall in the new Lincoln Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | February 15, 2007
Baltimore native Ben Goldstein got his first real taste of the music industry in high school. About six years ago, Goldstein interned at Morgan State University's radio station. "I love DJ'ing and music," he said. "That made me think that's what I want to do." Now, Goldstein, also known as DJ Goldrocc, runs the hip-hop label Sound- chron Records. He has worked with renowned producer Ayatollah, and released one of Ayatollah's instrumental albums, Listen, last year. The label's latest album, Sound Chronicles Volume 1, comes out internationally on Tuesday, and the free CD release party is Sunday at the GoodLove Bar in Canton.
NEWS
February 11, 2007
Iran's supreme leader was speaking to a gathering of air force commanders, warning of the consequences should the United States attack his country. ?The enemy knows well that any invasion would be followed by a comprehensive reaction to the invaders and their interests all over the world.? Ayatollah Ali Khamenei
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 2007
TEHRAN, IRAN -- Iran's outspoken president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, appears to be under pressure from the highest authorities in Iran to end his involvement in the country's nuclear program, a sign that his political capital is declining as his country comes under increasing international pressure. Less than a month after the United Nations Security Council imposed sanctions on Iran to curb its nuclear program, two hard-line newspapers, including one owned by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, called on the president to stay out of all matters nuclear.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,Los Angeles Times | September 17, 2006
ROME -- She cornered ayatollahs and challenged dictators. She was glamorous, fearless and always provocative. Oriana Fallaci, Italian author and globe-trotting journalist whose interviews produced piercing portraits of world leaders for decades, but who in later years channeled her energies into bitter diatribes against Islam, died Friday, her publisher said. Miss Fallaci, who never married and had no children, was 77 and had been suffering from cancer. She died at a private hospital in Florence, where she had arrived recently from New York, aware that her health was failing, the RCS publishing group said in a statement.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | June 30, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- The most fascinating part of my trip to Iran in late May was how much Iranian officials wanted to talk about holding talks with the United States. Shortly after I left Tehran, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice reversed nearly three decades of U.S. policy on Iran and announced U.S. willingness to speak directly with Iranians. Such meetings would be part of broader, European-led negotiations on Iran's nuclear program. Given the gulf between the two sides, this head-to-head meeting may never happen.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
Guests of the Ayatollah: The First Battle in America's War With Militant Islam Mark Bowden Atlantic Monthly Press / 704 pages / $26 If the global struggle between tradition and modernity, tribalism and globalism, religious radicals and the world's sole superpower might be traced to a particular moment, it would be a baleful Sunday 27 years ago. On Nov. 4, 1979, hundreds of Iranian students, followers of the Shiite cleric Ayatollah Khomeini, overran and...
NEWS
By New York Times | December 27, 1990
ON MONDAY Salman Rushdie tried to make peace with those who would have him dead. It was outrageous to begin with that the Ayatollah Khomeini should have declared a holy war on Rushdie's creative imagination. The least the nations of the world can now do is insist that Iran lift the death sentence.Rushdie, in the presence of an Egyptian secretary of state and other moderate Muslims, signed a statement embracing the Muslim faith and disavowing sections of his novel "The Satanic Verses" for which the ayatollah two years ago called on Muslims worldwide to take Rushdie's life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | February 15, 2007
Baltimore native Ben Goldstein got his first real taste of the music industry in high school. About six years ago, Goldstein interned at Morgan State University's radio station. "I love DJ'ing and music," he said. "That made me think that's what I want to do." Now, Goldstein, also known as DJ Goldrocc, runs the hip-hop label Sound- chron Records. He has worked with renowned producer Ayatollah, and released one of Ayatollah's instrumental albums, Listen, last year. The label's latest album, Sound Chronicles Volume 1, comes out internationally on Tuesday, and the free CD release party is Sunday at the GoodLove Bar in Canton.
FEATURES
February 14, 2006
Feb. 14 1895: Oscar Wilde's final play, The Importance of Being Earnest, opened at the St. James's Theatre in London. 1920: The League of Women Voters was founded in Chicago. 1989: Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini called on Muslims to kill Salman Rushdie, author of The Satanic Verses.
NEWS
By MICHAEL KINSLEY | February 10, 2006
So the prophet Muhammad walks into a bar ... Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the noted wit, expert on freedom, and unelected religious leader - the leader who counts - of Iran, observed the other day that in the West, "casting doubt or negating the genocide of the Jews is banned but insulting the beliefs of 1.5 billion Muslims is allowed." He apparently thought that this was a devastating point. Many self-styled voices of Islam have made the bizarre comparison between showing pictures of the prophet and expressing doubt about the Holocaust.
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