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Axis Of Evil

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By Mark Palmer | August 10, 2003
AS AMERICAN Marines move gingerly into Monrovia, basic questions are raised about the level of America's interest and commitment in Liberia. In January 2002, when President Bush defined the "axis of evil" as the dictatorships of Iraq, Iran and North Korea, he did not even mention Charles Taylor of Liberia. But this one-time warlord and escapee from an American prison is part of the real axis of evil -- the larger group of 44 dictators in an arc that runs unbroken west from North Korea and China through the Middle East and south to sub-Saharan Africa, according to Freedom in the World 2003, a Freedom House survey.
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NEWS
March 4, 2007
WORLD Sunni family targeted Gunmen rounded up a Sunni family that had received death threats for joining U.S.-organized talks with local Shiites, hauling away the men and boys and killing all six yesterday as insurgents expanded a campaign of fear against opponents. pg 17a Crackdown on Russian protest Police in St. Petersburg, Russia, clubbed protesters and dragged them into buses yesterday in response to a demonstration against the Kremlin in the heart of President Vladimir Putin's hometown.
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TOPIC
By Trudy Rubin and Trudy Rubin,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 10, 2002
REPUBLICANS used to criticize the Clinton team for spouting tough moral rhetoric on foreign policy, then failing to follow through. "Talk big and carry a twig" was the charge leveled against Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright. So how come President Bush has let himself get snarled in a rhetorical trap that makes Albright's polemics look puny? A new Bush doctrine - unveiled in his State of the Union address the week before last - labels Iraq, Iran, and North Korea as an "axis of evil."
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2004
Twenty-five years ago - when the face of evil in the Mideast was not that of Saddam Hussein, but of the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini - most would have figured Iran as the country targeted for an invasion by the United States, not Iraq. It may still be a more plausible target. Last week's commission report on the Sept. 11 attacks documents ties between Iran and al-Qaida and specifically with the Sept. 11 hijackers. On top of that, the country has a controversial and very real nuclear program - much better documented than Hussein's - that has drawn international condemnation.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | February 17, 2002
LONDON - Reading Europe's press, it is really reassuring to see how warmly Europeans have embraced President Bush's formulation that an "axis of evil" threatens world peace. There's only one small problem. Mr. Bush thinks the axis of evil is Iran, Iraq and North Korea, and the Europeans think it's Donald Rumsfeld, Dick Cheney and Condoleezza Rice. I'm not kidding. Chris Patten, the European Union's foreign policy czar, told The Guardian that the Bush axis-of-evil idea was dangerously "absolutist and simplistic," not "thought through" and "unhelpful," and that the Europeans needed to stop Washington before it went into "unilateralist overdrive."
NEWS
March 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - The journalists of Washington's Gridiron Club distilled political humor yesterday from a harrowing year of terrorism, anthrax, corporate bankruptcy and war. President Bush, the 20th president to be singed on the gridiron since 1885, endured a white-tie evening of musical skits set in places ranging from Guantanamo Bay to Vice President Dick Cheney's "undisclosed secure location." Cheney's secret shelter is a place much like "Hernando's Hideaway." "There is a dark, secluded place.
NEWS
March 4, 2007
WORLD Sunni family targeted Gunmen rounded up a Sunni family that had received death threats for joining U.S.-organized talks with local Shiites, hauling away the men and boys and killing all six yesterday as insurgents expanded a campaign of fear against opponents. pg 17a Crackdown on Russian protest Police in St. Petersburg, Russia, clubbed protesters and dragged them into buses yesterday in response to a demonstration against the Kremlin in the heart of President Vladimir Putin's hometown.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 25, 2002
WASHINGTON- Perhaps the most notable aspect of President Bush's stop in South Korea on his Asian trip last week was his refraining from a repetition there of his characterization of North Korea, Iraq and Iran as an "axis of evil." In Seoul, where his earlier bellicose language riled the locals who have been waging an uphill effort to achieve reunification with North Korea, he was quick to reassure the two Koreas that he supports that objective. Not only did he not repeat the "axis of evil" reference, Mr. Bush declared that he had "no intention of invading North Korea."
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | March 19, 2004
WASHINGTON - The new Spanish government's decision to respond to the attack by al-Qaida by going ahead with plans to pull its troops from Iraq constitutes the most dangerous moment we've faced since 9/11. It's what happens when the Axis of Evil intersects with the Axis of Appeasement and the Axis of Incompetence. Let's start with the Axis of Evil. We are up against a terrible nihilistic enemy. Think about what the Islamist terrorists are doing: They are trying to kill as many people in Iraq and elsewhere as possible so the United States fails in Iraq, so Iraq collapses into civil war, so even a glimmer of democracy never takes root in the Arab world and so America is weakened.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | June 13, 2002
TEHRAN, Iran -- Quick quiz: Which Muslim Middle East country held spontaneous candlelight vigils in sympathy with Americans after Sept. 11? Kuwait? No. Saudi Arabia? No. Iran? Yes. You got it! You win a free trip to Iran. And if you come you'll discover not only a Muslim country where many people were sincerely sympathetic to America after Sept. 11, but a country where so many people on the street are now talking about -- and hoping for -- a reopening of relations with America that the ruling hard-liners had to take the step two weeks ago of making it illegal for anyone to speak about it in public.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | March 19, 2004
WASHINGTON - The new Spanish government's decision to respond to the attack by al-Qaida by going ahead with plans to pull its troops from Iraq constitutes the most dangerous moment we've faced since 9/11. It's what happens when the Axis of Evil intersects with the Axis of Appeasement and the Axis of Incompetence. Let's start with the Axis of Evil. We are up against a terrible nihilistic enemy. Think about what the Islamist terrorists are doing: They are trying to kill as many people in Iraq and elsewhere as possible so the United States fails in Iraq, so Iraq collapses into civil war, so even a glimmer of democracy never takes root in the Arab world and so America is weakened.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
At one end of the axis of evil is a country that had no nuclear weapons - nor apparently any other weapons of mass destruction. It gets invaded. At the other end is a country that brags that it is building nuclear weapons. It gets an assurance that there are no plans to invade. Is there something wrong with this picture? The first country is, of course, Iraq. The second is North Korea. Last year, North Korea announced it was restarting nuclear reactors that could make weapons material.
NEWS
By Mark Palmer | August 10, 2003
AS AMERICAN Marines move gingerly into Monrovia, basic questions are raised about the level of America's interest and commitment in Liberia. In January 2002, when President Bush defined the "axis of evil" as the dictatorships of Iraq, Iran and North Korea, he did not even mention Charles Taylor of Liberia. But this one-time warlord and escapee from an American prison is part of the real axis of evil -- the larger group of 44 dictators in an arc that runs unbroken west from North Korea and China through the Middle East and south to sub-Saharan Africa, according to Freedom in the World 2003, a Freedom House survey.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 18, 2002
WASHINGTON - In the midst of a mounting confrontation with Iraq, Bush administration officials conceded yesterday that they don't yet have a plan for dealing with nuclear weapons development in a second nation that the president has dubbed part of an "axis of evil": North Korea. Two high-level U.S. envoys arrived in Asia yesterday to confer on a strategy with China, South Korea and Japan after North Korea's startling admission that it has a program to produce highly enriched uranium, a fuel for nuclear weapons.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | June 13, 2002
TEHRAN, Iran -- Quick quiz: Which Muslim Middle East country held spontaneous candlelight vigils in sympathy with Americans after Sept. 11? Kuwait? No. Saudi Arabia? No. Iran? Yes. You got it! You win a free trip to Iran. And if you come you'll discover not only a Muslim country where many people were sincerely sympathetic to America after Sept. 11, but a country where so many people on the street are now talking about -- and hoping for -- a reopening of relations with America that the ruling hard-liners had to take the step two weeks ago of making it illegal for anyone to speak about it in public.
NEWS
March 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - The journalists of Washington's Gridiron Club distilled political humor yesterday from a harrowing year of terrorism, anthrax, corporate bankruptcy and war. President Bush, the 20th president to be singed on the gridiron since 1885, endured a white-tie evening of musical skits set in places ranging from Guantanamo Bay to Vice President Dick Cheney's "undisclosed secure location." Cheney's secret shelter is a place much like "Hernando's Hideaway." "There is a dark, secluded place.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | February 28, 2002
WASHINGTON - Our Canadian and European "allies" are getting a bad case of the heebie-jeebies over President Bush's use of the phrase "axis of evil." Here at home, former officials of the Clinton administration as well as a predictable contingent of foreign policy "specialists" are also reaching for the smelling salts. French Foreign Minister Hubert Vedrine said, "Today we are threatened by a simplism that reduces all the problems of the world to the struggle against terrorism and is not properly thought through."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 31, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush's description of Iran, Iraq and North Korea as an "axis of evil" put those countries - and America's allies - on notice that he is determined to blunt the danger they pose, possibly with military force, officials said yesterday. The administration gave no sign that Bush has settled on a specific plan of action - military or diplomatic - to force the three regimes to abandon their chemical, biological and nuclear weapons programs and their links to a sprawling underworld of terror.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | February 28, 2002
WASHINGTON - Our Canadian and European "allies" are getting a bad case of the heebie-jeebies over President Bush's use of the phrase "axis of evil." Here at home, former officials of the Clinton administration as well as a predictable contingent of foreign policy "specialists" are also reaching for the smelling salts. French Foreign Minister Hubert Vedrine said, "Today we are threatened by a simplism that reduces all the problems of the world to the struggle against terrorism and is not properly thought through."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 25, 2002
WASHINGTON- Perhaps the most notable aspect of President Bush's stop in South Korea on his Asian trip last week was his refraining from a repetition there of his characterization of North Korea, Iraq and Iran as an "axis of evil." In Seoul, where his earlier bellicose language riled the locals who have been waging an uphill effort to achieve reunification with North Korea, he was quick to reassure the two Koreas that he supports that objective. Not only did he not repeat the "axis of evil" reference, Mr. Bush declared that he had "no intention of invading North Korea."
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