Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAxelrod
IN THE NEWS

Axelrod

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1996
A Columbia man who held up a bank to avoid his ex-wife's demands for child support was found guilty of robbery yesterday, despite his attorney's claims that he didn't mean any harm.Peter Laurence Axelrod, 49, of the 5700 block of Stevens Forest Road in Columbia's Oakland Mills village was returned to Springfield Hospital Center yesterday, where friends said he is being treated for depression and is on suicide watch. He will be sentenced May 23.Asked by Howard County Circuit Judge James B. Dudley if he had anything to say, Axelrod stood with his hands crossed behind his back and said, "I'd just like to apologize."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
Since his golf outing with Tiger Woods, President Obama has been battling with the press over access. And things only look to get more contentious this week as we move toward sequester Friday. Here's a look at a wide-ranging discussion of the issues involved that aired Sunday on CNN's "Reliable Sources" with host Howie Kurtz. The first video has me engaged with longtime CBS White House correspondent Bill Plante, and Julie Mason, host of "Press Pool" weekdays on the POTUS channel (124)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Special to the Sun | January 28, 2001
Dr. Joseph Axelrod likes adventure. But the 63-year-old dentist, who has cycled through southern France, traveled to Africa and likes to scuba dive, had never tried heli-skiing. An avid downhill skier for more than 30 years, Axelrod had dreamed of having a helicopter fly him to a remote mountaintop to ski on untraversed powder. But the Pikesville resident couldn't talk any of his friends into going along. "All of my skiing life I've wanted to go heli-skiing," he says. "But it was costly; there was always an excuse.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 25, 2013
There was a time when the lines between the practices of politics and journalism were clear-cut. Professional politicians did their thing, which was getting elected and getting others elected. Professional journalists did theirs, writing and telling how the politicians did what they did. Seldom did the two meet in public opinion forums Today, political operatives are regular commentators and analysts on radio, television and the Internet, and journalists of all political persuasions run for public office, sometimes getting elected.
NEWS
March 18, 2003
On March 15, 2003 LOUIS ALLEN EHUDIN beloved son of Eddie and Ann (nee Proper) Ehudin, beloved brother of Marilyn Axelrod, beloved brother-in-law of Les Axelrod, devoted uncle of Adam Axelrod. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS INC., 8900 Reisterstown Rd., at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Monday March 17 at 12 noon. Interment Beth El Memorial Park, Randallstown. Please omit flowers. In mourning at (Greenspring East) 2803 Quarry Heights Way (21209) through Tuesday.
NEWS
February 8, 2004
On February 5, 2004, ANN SHIRLEY EHUDIN; beloved mother of Marilyn Axelrod and the late Louis Allan Ehudin; devoted mother-in-law of Les Axelrod; devoted sister of Sidney Proper, Esther Elkin, Ruth Adelman, Herbert Proper and the late Rueben Proper; loving grandmother Adam Marc Axelrod. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS INC., 8900 Reisterstown Rd, at Mt. Wilson Lane on Sunday, February 8, at 2 PM. Interment Beth El Memorial Park, Randallstown. Please omit flowers. In mourning at (Greenspring East)
NEWS
January 1, 2005
Julius Axelrod , 92, a scientist with the National Institutes of Health who won the Nobel Prize for his work on how nerve cells communicate and affect behavior, died Wednesday at his home in Rockville. The neuroscientist shared the 1970 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine with two other scientists, Bernard Katz of Britain and Ulf von Euler of Sweden. Their work on the chemicals released by nerve endings enabled the development of antidepressants such as Prozac and Zoloft. Earlier in his career, Dr. Axelrod helped identify acetaminophen, which drug maker Johnson & Johnson uses in the pain reliever Tylenol.
NEWS
By CHARLES R. WOLPOFF and CHARLES R. WOLPOFF,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 1, 1995
Columbia man charged with robbing his neighborhood bank said at his bail review hearing Friday that he robbed the bank because he wanted to be arrested."
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1996
A Columbia man who robbed a bank to avoid paying child support was sentenced in Howard County Circuit Court Friday to six years in prison with a suspension of all but the year he has already served in jail.Peter Laurence Axelrod, 49, of the 5700 block of Stevens Forest Road in Columbia's Oakland Mills village was also ordered to continue receiving counseling through Howard County Health Department's mental health services.In suspending Axelrod's sentence, Howard County Circuit Judge James B. Dudley said he didn't believe that Axelrod would repeat a crime like the robbery of the First National Bank at Oakland Mills Village Center in September 1995.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news , world news , and news about the economy MSNBC has long been as bad as Fox News when it comes to ideological bias. But with the hiring of longtime Team Obama loyalists David Axelrod and Robert Gibbs, it's official: MSNBC is worse. The cable channel that flies under the banner of NBC News is now all but a bona fide organ of state propaganda, an information channel that speaks in the same dominant voice as the folks running the government -- and tries to mask what it is up to. I didn't plan on getting all free-press-and-democracy amped up about the hirings until I saw Axelrod with Andrea Mitchell last week in his first appearance on MSNBC.
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | September 7, 2009
White House officials said Sunday that the presidential environmental adviser Van Jones resigned this weekend of his own accord, a move resulting from a furor over his fiery remarks about Republicans and his signature on a petition questioning whether the U.S. government had any role in planning the Sept. 11 attacks. White House officials never rose to defend the aide, a prominent San Francisco community activist, and took pains over the weekend to distance themselves from Jones' past statements and decisions about his employment status.
NEWS
By Peter Nicholas and Peter Nicholas,Los Angeles Times | December 29, 2008
WASHINGTON - President-elect Barack Obama's top advisers said yesterday that they won't back away from a promise to cut taxes on the middle class and raise them for the wealthiest Americans, as they made the case for a huge new stimulus package geared toward reviving the slumping economy. Speaking on Sunday talk shows and in a newspaper opinion piece, Obama aides stepped up a drive to build a broad political consensus behind Obama's core economic proposals: a two-year spending package that could exceed $775 billion, coupled with tax policies weighted in favor of the middle class.
NEWS
By Maria L. La Ganga | February 21, 2008
CHICAGO -- Sen. Barack Obama strode into a hotel ballroom filled with expectation one recent Tuesday and declared that his quest for the Oval Office, which "began as a whisper in Springfield, has swelled to a chorus of millions calling for change." That's the essence of the Illinois senator's message: Obama equals change; Hillary Clinton equals status quo. All else cascades from there. In this contest - where the candidates are but a micron or so apart on most policy matters - message is everything.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | April 27, 2006
Parisian baroque The lowdown -- Pro Musica Rara wraps up a very strong season with an appealing mix of baroque repertoire this weekend. The ensemble fulfills a vital role in the local scene, opening an aural window onto the past by performing early music on period instruments. Kenneth Slowik, artistic director of the chamber music program at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History and a founding member of the Smithsonian Chamber Players and the Axelrod and Smithsonian quartets, among others, will be a guest artist on the viola da gamba.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | January 20, 2006
New York Knicks forward Antonio Davis knew he risked being suspended for leaving his team's bench in Chicago during Wednesday night's game against the Bulls because he believed he saw his wife being accosted by a fan at the United Center. What he didn't know was that his case would be treated similarly to some members of the Indiana Pacers who followed Ron Artest into the stands and the court at the Palace of Auburn Hills during the infamous brawl with the Detroit Pistons and their fans in November 2004.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2005
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - The Orioles made their pitch. Now, it's up to Phil Nevin to decide if he wants to waive his limited no-trade clause and take his cuts in an Orioles uniform. Manager Lee Mazzilli spoke yesterday by phone to Nevin, the first baseman whom the San Diego Padres have agreed to trade to the Orioles for pitcher Sidney Ponson pending Nevin's approval, and outlined his expected role with the Orioles. Nevin also called Orioles utility infielder Chris Gomez, his former teammate in Detroit and San Diego and also a California native, to ask about playing for the Orioles.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2005
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - The Orioles have reached a tentative deal that would send much-maligned pitcher Sidney Ponson to the San Diego Padres for first baseman Phil Nevin, according to industry sources, though the trade won't go through until it gets Nevin's approval. Reached at his home last night, Nevin's agent, Barry Axelrod, described the chances of Nevin accepting the deal as "less than 50-50." Nevin has a no-trade clause in his contract that requires his consent to be traded to eight teams, one of which is the Orioles.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.