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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2011
Virginia Jefferson spent the past 65 years putting her customers in the dark. As the proprietor of an old Baltimore awning company, it was her role to spread the shade on the hottest of summer afternoons. About to turn 89, she is retiring and selling a business founded by her father in 1917. This week, she will leave an office that has never seen a computer and the desk where she has worked since 1946. She'll surrender her electric typewriter, carbon paper and ledger books filled with the names of the 500 people who have relied on her to screen their homes under one of her tentlike, custom-tailored enclosures supported by pipes and lashed with ropes.
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By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 23, 2013
The Hampden Family Center is already benefiting from A Taste of Hampden, the annual fundraiser that takes place Thursday, Oct. 24. In recent days, the family center, 1104 West 36th St., received an exterior face lift in anticipation of the event, with the community raising money for a new awning and volunteers painting the inside of the building. "How nice is that?" marveled Lisa Ghinger, executive director of the center. The center is benefiting in other ways too. Daniel Wylie, owner of the clothing store Sixteen Tons, is donating his services as a deejay at the event.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2002
Lorenz E. Jefferson, a semi-retired owner of L.E. Jefferson & Son Awning Co., one of the oldest manufacturers of custom-made awnings in Baltimore, died of leukemia Sunday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 91 and lived in Towson. Born and raised in Waverly, he was the son of Leonidas E. Jefferson. Before air-conditioning, and when seemingly every Baltimore front porch or home sported awnings, the elder Mr. Jefferson decided to establish his awning firm. In 1917, he established L.E. Jefferson & Son Awning Co. in the 3300 block of Greenmount Ave., where he specialized in the dark-green striped or terracotta-colored heat-beaters that helped keep porches and interior spaces dark and cool.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2011
Virginia Jefferson spent the past 65 years putting her customers in the dark. As the proprietor of an old Baltimore awning company, it was her role to spread the shade on the hottest of summer afternoons. About to turn 89, she is retiring and selling a business founded by her father in 1917. This week, she will leave an office that has never seen a computer and the desk where she has worked since 1946. She'll surrender her electric typewriter, carbon paper and ledger books filled with the names of the 500 people who have relied on her to screen their homes under one of her tentlike, custom-tailored enclosures supported by pipes and lashed with ropes.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | July 5, 2003
I GET nostalgic for the old Baltimore seasonal changes I experienced as a child. My latest pangs had something to do with when the guys arrived with my stored canvas awnings and attached them via ropes and pulleys over the back porch and hottest windows. Their labors plunge my first floor into the kind of delightful permanent afternoon shade you get under a beach umbrella on a hot day. Shafts of filtered light penetrate, but the whole effect is one of shelter, privacy and rest. Some people object to the way the awnings enclose the house within deep shadows, but this half-light works for me. Judging by the sentiments in a letter I found in my home archives the other day, our longtime neighbor, Dorothy Croswell, thought so too. I quote her reflections on the old family house at Guilford Avenue, where I learned all my secrets of living comfortably in Baltimore: "Before air conditioning (I don't think there was an electric fan at 2829 [Guilford]
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | July 6, 2006
Their name is Ferndale Fence and Awning, but they're not in Ferndale and they don't build fences. What they do is make awnings - aluminum awnings that rattle in rainstorms, red-and-white peppermint stripe awnings for barbershops, little awnings that hang over rowhouse windows like drowsy eyelids, big awnings that shield whole families from the hot slap of July sun. For more than three decades, in a whitewashed brick workshop on Thames Street, using just...
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1999
The desk Bryan Loane sits at belonged to his father. His file cabinet, to his grandfather. But the company he heads, Loane Bros. Inc., is rooted much further back in his genealogy -- and Baltimore's history.The family business, now a $3 million-a-year party tent rental and canvas awning company, started out in 1815 as a sail maker's loft on Bowley's Wharf at the Inner Harbor.In the 184 years since Bryan's great-great-great-grandfather, Joseph Loane, began producing canvas sails, the company has survived by adjusting and refocusing, abandoning the production of sails, shifting to canvas awnings and, later, party tents.
BUSINESS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2001
Mayor Martin O'Malley announced yesterday the kickoff of a $3.5 million face lift for Lexington Market, which he envisions as a social and economic anchor for the soon-to-be-revitalized west side of downtown Baltimore. O'Malley said his administration's efforts to persuade more people to live in the new housing units being built downtown hinge on providing them "a place to shop, someplace with character, someplace to draw people together." Indeed, bankers and developers involved in the west-side redevelopment plan see a newly renovated market as a key piece of the project.
NEWS
By RUTH L. TISDALE and RUTH L. TISDALE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 30, 2005
In 1965, Olof Martensson looked at the changing scope of the world culture and told his father it was time to change the company business of making umbrellas to selling retractable awnings. "I told my father that I was not sure about umbrellas in the future, and I told him I wanted to go into awnings," said the Swedish-born Martensson. "My father wasn't too pleased with the idea, but I wanted to make awnings that the middle man could afford." Forty years after Martensson left the family umbrella business to begin his awnings company, he and his family decided to bridge the present and the past and open their own umbrella museum.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2001
Baltimore's popular Lexington Market, which has sold produce and meats at the same downtown spot for more than two centuries, is set to receive a $3.5 million face lift in the coming months. Larger windows, wider entrances and new stalls, signs and lights are part of the plan, which is scheduled to receive the go-ahead from the city's Board of Estimates today. The market's orange-and-red awnings would be torn down and replaced with a lattice of iron girders and red awnings. Funding for the project would be provided by a combination of loans and state grants.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 12, 2010
Three people were injured when the awnings of adjoining rowhouses crumbled in Northwest Baltimore on Friday, one in s string of collapses across the region as the weight of massive snowfalls exacted a toll on vulnerable buildings. An antique store in downtown Ellicott City suffered damage, and barns in Anne Arundel and Harford counties fell, killing some animals. On Oakford Road in Baltimore, Marlow Hill, 66, surveyed the twisted metal on the steps of his home and pointed to the blood left when his wife, daughter and brother-in-law were trapped beneath the awnings.
BUSINESS
By Stacy Downs and Stacy Downs,McClatchy-Tribune | July 13, 2008
Awnings are common in Europe, where nearly one of every three homes has one. But in the United States, where only 3 percent of houses have awnings, they're more of a novelty. That number is growing, however, because people want to spend more time outdoors on their patios, porches and decks. "They add another room to your home," says Greg O'Brien, who had a fabric awning installed on the back of his Leawood, Kan., house a year ago. Before, O'Brien's west-facing patio would become uncomfortable when the temperature hit the 80s. In summer, it felt like an oven.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | July 6, 2006
Their name is Ferndale Fence and Awning, but they're not in Ferndale and they don't build fences. What they do is make awnings - aluminum awnings that rattle in rainstorms, red-and-white peppermint stripe awnings for barbershops, little awnings that hang over rowhouse windows like drowsy eyelids, big awnings that shield whole families from the hot slap of July sun. For more than three decades, in a whitewashed brick workshop on Thames Street, using just...
NEWS
By RUTH L. TISDALE and RUTH L. TISDALE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 30, 2005
In 1965, Olof Martensson looked at the changing scope of the world culture and told his father it was time to change the company business of making umbrellas to selling retractable awnings. "I told my father that I was not sure about umbrellas in the future, and I told him I wanted to go into awnings," said the Swedish-born Martensson. "My father wasn't too pleased with the idea, but I wanted to make awnings that the middle man could afford." Forty years after Martensson left the family umbrella business to begin his awnings company, he and his family decided to bridge the present and the past and open their own umbrella museum.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | July 5, 2003
I GET nostalgic for the old Baltimore seasonal changes I experienced as a child. My latest pangs had something to do with when the guys arrived with my stored canvas awnings and attached them via ropes and pulleys over the back porch and hottest windows. Their labors plunge my first floor into the kind of delightful permanent afternoon shade you get under a beach umbrella on a hot day. Shafts of filtered light penetrate, but the whole effect is one of shelter, privacy and rest. Some people object to the way the awnings enclose the house within deep shadows, but this half-light works for me. Judging by the sentiments in a letter I found in my home archives the other day, our longtime neighbor, Dorothy Croswell, thought so too. I quote her reflections on the old family house at Guilford Avenue, where I learned all my secrets of living comfortably in Baltimore: "Before air conditioning (I don't think there was an electric fan at 2829 [Guilford]
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2002
Lorenz E. Jefferson, a semi-retired owner of L.E. Jefferson & Son Awning Co., one of the oldest manufacturers of custom-made awnings in Baltimore, died of leukemia Sunday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 91 and lived in Towson. Born and raised in Waverly, he was the son of Leonidas E. Jefferson. Before air-conditioning, and when seemingly every Baltimore front porch or home sported awnings, the elder Mr. Jefferson decided to establish his awning firm. In 1917, he established L.E. Jefferson & Son Awning Co. in the 3300 block of Greenmount Ave., where he specialized in the dark-green striped or terracotta-colored heat-beaters that helped keep porches and interior spaces dark and cool.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | April 19, 1991
The Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, where the Marine Band exuded Semper Fidelis self-confidence Tuesday night, switched to Russian introspection last night and not without a Tchaikovsky progression from somber to gloomy to mournful.Conductor David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra found the composer's core with booming brass, lavish strings and artistic woodwinds vigorously interpreting the Symphony No. 6 ("Pathetique"). Handled by Zinman's troupe, this extravagant excess in yearning remains irresistible.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | August 2, 1993
When Jacob Glushakow paints Baltimore, the sidewalks are cracked, the shops offer second-hand clothing and the people look as if they'd known hard times.A comprehensive new exhibition of his works over a 60-year span reveals this painter's eye for Baltimore and her sagging people.Far from being depressing or sarcastic, the show mounted by the Jewish Historical Society is a brilliant testament to a way of urban life that has all but evaporated today."An Eye for East Baltimore: Paintings and Drawings by Jacob Glushakow" is just that, a perspective that sees beauty, dignity and peace in a quiet morning trip to the neighborhood grocery store.
BUSINESS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2001
Mayor Martin O'Malley announced yesterday the kickoff of a $3.5 million face lift for Lexington Market, which he envisions as a social and economic anchor for the soon-to-be-revitalized west side of downtown Baltimore. O'Malley said his administration's efforts to persuade more people to live in the new housing units being built downtown hinge on providing them "a place to shop, someplace with character, someplace to draw people together." Indeed, bankers and developers involved in the west-side redevelopment plan see a newly renovated market as a key piece of the project.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2001
Baltimore's popular Lexington Market, which has sold produce and meats at the same downtown spot for more than two centuries, is set to receive a $3.5 million face lift in the coming months. Larger windows, wider entrances and new stalls, signs and lights are part of the plan, which is scheduled to receive the go-ahead from the city's Board of Estimates today. The market's orange-and-red awnings would be torn down and replaced with a lattice of iron girders and red awnings. Funding for the project would be provided by a combination of loans and state grants.
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