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By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | December 10, 1991
Unable to catch a bus or get a ride with a friend, Mary walks more than a mile in the soaking rain to her appointment at A Woman's Active Recovery Enterprise.Mary arrives an hour late, pink-cheeked and wet. A counselor helps Mary off with her dripping coat. Another slips into a back room to make some hot tea.Mary, 27, who asked that her real name not be used, is one of about 25 clients at AWARE, Maryland's only state-funded, outpatient drug-treatment center for women in Baltimore County.She receives counseling at the Catonsville center three times a week, in the hope of regaining custody of her 3 1/2 -year-old son who is living with her mother.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Breast cancer gets a lot of attention - and not just during October, which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. There's a good reason for that, as any of the quarter-million American women diagnosed with breast cancer each year will tell you. But breast cancer isn't the only serious health risk women should be aware of, according to county health professionals. Some are fatal; others are not. Some are well-known, others obscure. All affect the person's quality of life, and all affect more women than men. We talked with some Howard County doctors in the know to find out what to look out for and where to learn more locally.
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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | September 18, 2006
BOSTON -- Of all the headlines on the story, this one took the prize for provocation: "Woman in Vegetative State Plays Tennis in Her Head." I suppose this is what happens when science throws up a startling piece of new research, and the media slams it into the court of public opinion. In Britain, researchers have reported that a totally unresponsive 23-year-old woman showed signs of awareness on a brain-imaging test. When asked to imagine playing tennis, her brain lit up the same neural pathways as a healthy brain.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Baltimore lawmakers and community activists called Sunday for more reforms and federal oversight of the city's Police Department after learning about broken bones and battered faces from an investigation into allegations of police brutality in recent years. Responding to results of a six-month Baltimore Sun investigation , two councilmen said they had not known that the city paid money in more than 100 settlements or jury verdicts since 2011. "The administration likes to keep some of that quiet," said Councilman Warren Branch, head of the panel's public safety committee.
SPORTS
April 26, 2003
Who's hot Mike Mussina of the Yankees has allowed three earned runs over the past 31 innings. Who's not The Reds lead the majors with 29 errors in 23 games after com mitting two last night. Line of the day Richie Sexson, Brewers 1B AB R H RBI HR 5 4 4 5 3 On deck Claudio Vargas of the Expos makes his major league de but today, facing the Astros. He said it "I wasn't aware it was an anniversary until today. My wife didn't mention it." Clint Hurdle, Rockies manager, who marks his first year on the job today
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | September 8, 2002
Every now and then, some visionary individuals come along with a concept that is so original and so revolutionary that your immediate reaction is: "Those individuals should be on medication." Today I want to tell you about two such people, John Baur and Mark Summers, who have come up with a concept that is going to make you kick yourself for not thinking of it first: Talk Like a Pirate Day. As the name suggests, this is a day on which everybody would talk like a pirate. Is that a great idea, or what?
NEWS
By Peter Hermann Gary Gately | September 4, 1991
It wasn't the best way to tell the powers that be about a bump in Rowe Boulevard. But the message got through loud and clear.An Annapolis road warrior, apparently weary of cruising over an unplanned speed bump in the west lane, wrote a pithy message on the protrusion last week."
NEWS
August 27, 1992
DEBORAH Armenti and I worked in the same data processing unit at USF&G, both of us as technical writers.I met her early in 1988, not long after I had started working at USF&G and only shortly after my first daughter, Anna, was born.One of my concerns at that time had been finding a reliable day care provider. My wife had recently gone back to work after 12 weeks of maternity leave, and we were not able to find somebody we could trust to care for the baby while we were at our jobs. After two distressing situations with sitters who lasted only a few weeks each, Deborah told me of a lady in her neighborhood with whom she left her own children -- then 3 and 6 years old -- and provided an introduction for us.Deborah was a good friend and an interesting conversationalist.
BUSINESS
By George B. Laurent | December 12, 1993
Noise creates more ugly confrontations between tenants than anything else.Many times, the situation deteriorates into open warfare: constant complaints and angry denials; pounding on the ceiling or stomping on the floor; calls to the police followed by louder noise when the police have left or even more vicious retaliation.Many tenants who are accused of being loud feel harassed by someone who is unreasonable and overly sensitive. Some say they endure noises from other apartments and wonder why the tenant who complained can't also take the noise in stride.
NEWS
By KELLY-ANNE SUAREZ AND TONY PERRY and KELLY-ANNE SUAREZ AND TONY PERRY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 24, 2006
RANCHO DOMINGUEZ, Calif. -- Randy "Duke" Cunningham has commanded public attention for the past year, as he fell from a position of power in Congress to disgrace and federal prison after he admitted taking $2.4 million in bribes. The fascination appears to be over. The much-ballyhooed Internal Revenue Service auction of the contents of Cunningham's San Diego County home - acquired largely as the wages of corruption - drew little response yesterday, despite heavy advance publicity. Few among the hundreds of people who showed up at the regular IRS auction at a cavernous warehouse were aware that the politician's belongings were available.
NEWS
Deanna Wilson, Stephanie Sparrow and Jennifer Kirschner | August 29, 2014
Last year, 858 Maryland residents died due to alcohol or drug intoxication; that's enough to replace the entire University of Maryland football team more than eight times. This year is on track to be even more deadly, with a 33 percent increase in accidental opioid overdose deaths recorded in the first three months of 2014 alone. We do not want any more families, friends and communities to grieve their fallen loved ones. It is time for all of us to call this problem what is: an epidemic.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Musicians will sing and strum and play the harmonica Thursday night in Annapolis night to raise funds - and awareness - for Lyme disease. Headlining the Ticked Off Music Fest will be Les Stroud, a TV survivalist and musician from Canada. He'll be joined by two musicians who survived Lyme disease and a lawyer-singer-songwriter from Annapolis. "My hope is to bring awareness to Anne Arundel County about the dangers of tick-borne diseases," said Karen Owen, a fitness instructor and mother from the Broadneck community who is organizing the concert.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
The hottest Facebook trend right now is ice. The "Ice Bucket Challenge" became a fundraising bonanza in recent weeks for the ALS Association, which has garnered about 107,000 new donors - about 31/2 times the number of people who have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Those who research and treat the rare neurological disorder, better known as Lou Gehrig's disease, aren't even sure how many people knew what it was before the challenge. "This has been the biggest bang for our buck," Rita Sattler, an ALS researcher in the Robert Packard Center for ALS at Johns Hopkins, said about the money and awareness from the campaign.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Physicians, public health officials and mental health advocates hope the death of Robin Williams will bring new attention to suicide, the little-discussed and less-understood phenomenon that now ranks among the top 10 causes of death in the United States. The public might consider it a concern chiefly for teens and the elderly. But adults ages 45 to 64 - the Academy Award-winning actor was 63 - now account for the largest number of suicides and have the fastest-growing suicide rate.
NEWS
By Samuel Johnson Jr | August 12, 2014
The response to crises such as the 9/11 attacks, the Boston Marathon bombings or the landslide that collapsed a Baltimore street this spring inevitably elevate the public consciousness of the professionalism and courage of police, firefighters and other first responders. But sometimes a different kind of consciousness is raised. Corruption or lawless behavior by public-safety personnel - such as the shootings and looting by New Orleans police officers following Hurricane Katrina or, more recently, the police chokehold that killed an unarmed man on a Staten Island sidewalk, caught on video by members of the community - can undo all of that goodwill in a moment.
NEWS
Justin George and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Friends say Mia Henderson had only recently moved back to Baltimore when she became the victim of a homicide this week in Northwest Baltimore. Henderson was found in a Hanlon-Longwood neighborhood alley early Wednesday, killed by "severe trauma," police said. Henderson's brother, Reggie Bullock, is a shooting guard for the Los Angeles Clippers, and her death became national and international news Thursday in part because of that connection. Police say the killing of Henderson, 26, a transgender woman, bears similarities to the killing of another transgender woman named Kandy Hall, 40, about a month ago in Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
July 21, 1995
FROM an article in the New Yorker by James S. Kunen, on the end of federal higher-education grants for prisoners:Most of the inmate students whom I spoke to believe that politicians are well aware that cutting prisoner education programs will result in higher recidivism rates and contribute to a need for more prisons. They believe that right-wing politicians consider additional prison construction not a necessary evil but a necessary good.Leslie Rodgers, a tall, broad-shouldered 37-year-old white man from Bay Ridge [N.Y.
FEATURES
By SUSAN DEITZ and SUSAN DEITZ,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 9, 1994
Q: I thought you might be interested in some thoughts on midlife singleness, ideas that have been on my mind during the nearly three years since I became a widow. My husband committed suicide when I was 45.The large adjustments I seem to be able to handle quite aptly. Day-to-day business, constant changes in the family structure, meals for one or for many, developing new interests, and even single parenting -- all eventually click in. It's the relationships with those outside my sphere that I have so much difficulty with.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
At the urging of fire and rescue personnel upset by continuing roadway carnage, Baltimore County's top officials recently announced an effort to reduce pedestrian accidents and fatalities. If anything, the campaign is overdue given that the county recorded 22 pedestrian crash fatalities last year and is on pace to meet and exceed that total this year. At a news conference, County Executive Kevin Kamenetz noted the upward trend, decrying the fact that last year's total was far higher than during any of the five years prior.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
The anxiety began hours after Laurie Bardon Syphard gave birth to her daughter and grew as the weeks ticked by. Was the baby sleeping enough? Was she malnourished? Dehydrated? Syphard became obsessed with the cleanliness of her daughter's baby bottles, cycling through them in a rigid rotation. She worried that a catastrophe would occur each time they left the house. "I would pack and repack the diaper bag eight times and then never leave," she said. The anxiety was so overwhelming that Syphard sometimes struggled to get out of bed. Syphard, 34, knew that her symptoms were more than the typical jitters of a new parent.
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