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By Nori Keston | May 5, 1994
AWADAGIN PRATT, the young Peabody-trained musician who two years ago became the first African American pianist to win the prestigious Naumberg Competition, last month celebrated the release of his debut album on the EMI label.The album documents some of the works Awadagin has played in a whirl wind concert schedule since winning the Naumberg, including the Busoni transcription of Bach's Chaconne in D Minor, and Liszt's "Funerailles," two massively Romantic pieces that highlight the pianist's unique interpretive gifts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 4, 2002
J.S. Bach Bach: Keyboard Concertos Nos. 3, 5, 6 and 7. Murray Perahia, pianist and conductor; Academy of St. Martin in the Fields. (Sony Classical SK 89690) "Play Bach." Awadagin Pratt, pianist; St. Lawrence String Quartet. (Angel 7243 5 57227) Bach: Sonatas for Violin and Harpsichord. Giuliano Carmignola, violinist; Andrea Marcon, harpsichordist. (Sony Classical S2K 89469, two discs) The intricate brilliance and sheer beauty of Bach's music find worthy advocates in these three new releases.
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FEATURES
By Kenneth Meltzer and Kenneth Meltzer,Contributing Writer | January 10, 1994
Pianist Awadagin Pratt's Saturday "Candlelight Concert" recital at Howard Community College did not enjoy the most auspicious of beginnings. An already seated capacity audience and Mr. Pratt anxiously waited for more than 15 minutes while seats were added for standby patrons.This seemed to unnerve Mr. Pratt, who briefly walked onto the stage before his cue and then quickly exited.When the lights finally dimmed and Mr. Pratt entered dressed in a striped short-sleeved polo shirt and slacks, the apparently confused audience momentarily withheld its applause.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 12, 2001
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, recently immersed in Russian, Czech and Norwegian music, is turning its attention to French fare this weekend and made a filling meal out of it. The chef is George Pehlivanian, a talented American with a French connection - he won a conducting competition in France a decade ago. And when he last visited the BSO in 1999, it was with a French twist, too - music by Saint-Saens, who's on this bill, along with Berlioz....
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 12, 2001
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, recently immersed in Russian, Czech and Norwegian music, is turning its attention to French fare this weekend and made a filling meal out of it. The chef is George Pehlivanian, a talented American with a French connection - he won a conducting competition in France a decade ago. And when he last visited the BSO in 1999, it was with a French twist, too - music by Saint-Saens, who's on this bill, along with Berlioz....
NEWS
January 20, 1994
A year ago Awadagin Pratt, the young Peabody-trained pianist who in 1992 became the first African-American instrumentalist to win the prestigious Naumburg Award, had to ferret out friends and fellow students from the school's practice rooms to make up an audience for his recitals. Last week, when Mr. Pratt made his debut with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra at Meyerhoff Hall, the house was sold out for both performances. Such is the progress from struggling unknown to superstar -- a transformation Mr. Pratt has achieved virtually overnight.
NEWS
July 4, 1995
For the third time this century the venerable firm of Steinway & Sons, maker of the world's most famous pianos, has changed hands. The transition inevitably marks a period of uncertainty for the revered marque at a time when the future of the American piano industry is clouded.For most of this century, Steinway was a family-owned business whose products were synonymous with artistic excellence and hand-crafted quality. The Steinway piano was not only a fine musical instrument but a sound investment whose value increased steadily over the years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 4, 2002
J.S. Bach Bach: Keyboard Concertos Nos. 3, 5, 6 and 7. Murray Perahia, pianist and conductor; Academy of St. Martin in the Fields. (Sony Classical SK 89690) "Play Bach." Awadagin Pratt, pianist; St. Lawrence String Quartet. (Angel 7243 5 57227) Bach: Sonatas for Violin and Harpsichord. Giuliano Carmignola, violinist; Andrea Marcon, harpsichordist. (Sony Classical S2K 89469, two discs) The intricate brilliance and sheer beauty of Bach's music find worthy advocates in these three new releases.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau Music Critic Stephen Wigler contributed to this story | May 13, 1992
An May 13 article about Awadagin Pratt, the Peabody pianist who won the prestigious Naumburg Competition, incorrectly stated that Mr. Pratt was the first black recipient of the award. In fact, several black singers have won; Mr. Pratt was the first black instrumentalist to win.The Sun regrets the error.NEW YORK -- In performances of Bach, Liszt and Beethoven tinged by a few minor errors and illuminated by individualistic brilliance, Awadagin Pratt, a student at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore, yesterday became the first African-American to win the prestigious Naumburg Competition for young musicians.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau Music Critic Stephen Wigler contributed to this article | May 13, 1992
An May 13 article about Awadagin Pratt, the Peabody pianist who won the prestigious Naumburg Competition, incorrectly stated that Mr. Pratt was the first black recipient of the award. In fact, several black singers have won; Mr. Pratt was the first black instrumentalist to win.The Sun regrets the error.NEW YORK -- In performances of Bach, Liszt and Beethoven tinged by a few minor errors and illuminated by individualistic brilliance, Awadagin Pratt, a student at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore, yesterday became the first African-American to win the prestigious Naumburg Competition for young musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Music Critic | February 27, 2000
Look for more choral music, many romantic and late romantic composers, and a number of rising stars in the Baltimore Symphony's 2000-2001 concert season. Among the more striking offerings in the season (which is being announced today) is a concert rendition of the Tchaikovsky opera "Iolanta"; violinist Midori performing Tchaikovsky's violin concerto; an all-Sibelius program with violinist Viktor Tretyakov; the Mozart "Requiem"; and Prokofiev's "Ivan the Terrible" (which was written for the famed Sergei Eisenstein film)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 12, 1999
A few years back pianist Awadagin Pratt became the first African-American instrumentalist to win first prize in an international music competition when he won the prestigious Naumburg Prize. The bestowal of musical gifts transcends matters of race and gender. Nevertheless, Pratt's victory understandably caused a stir -- as did his unconventional (for a concert pianist) dreadlocks, casual attire and practically down-to-the-floor (21 inches to be exact) seated position at the piano.Like his idol, Glenn Gould, Pratt is something of a maverick.
NEWS
July 4, 1995
For the third time this century the venerable firm of Steinway & Sons, maker of the world's most famous pianos, has changed hands. The transition inevitably marks a period of uncertainty for the revered marque at a time when the future of the American piano industry is clouded.For most of this century, Steinway was a family-owned business whose products were synonymous with artistic excellence and hand-crafted quality. The Steinway piano was not only a fine musical instrument but a sound investment whose value increased steadily over the years.
NEWS
January 20, 1994
A year ago Awadagin Pratt, the young Peabody-trained pianist who in 1992 became the first African-American instrumentalist to win the prestigious Naumburg Award, had to ferret out friends and fellow students from the school's practice rooms to make up an audience for his recitals. Last week, when Mr. Pratt made his debut with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra at Meyerhoff Hall, the house was sold out for both performances. Such is the progress from struggling unknown to superstar -- a transformation Mr. Pratt has achieved virtually overnight.
FEATURES
By Kenneth Meltzer and Kenneth Meltzer,Contributing Writer | January 10, 1994
Pianist Awadagin Pratt's Saturday "Candlelight Concert" recital at Howard Community College did not enjoy the most auspicious of beginnings. An already seated capacity audience and Mr. Pratt anxiously waited for more than 15 minutes while seats were added for standby patrons.This seemed to unnerve Mr. Pratt, who briefly walked onto the stage before his cue and then quickly exited.When the lights finally dimmed and Mr. Pratt entered dressed in a striped short-sleeved polo shirt and slacks, the apparently confused audience momentarily withheld its applause.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau Music Critic Stephen Wigler contributed to this story | May 13, 1992
An May 13 article about Awadagin Pratt, the Peabody pianist who won the prestigious Naumburg Competition, incorrectly stated that Mr. Pratt was the first black recipient of the award. In fact, several black singers have won; Mr. Pratt was the first black instrumentalist to win.The Sun regrets the error.NEW YORK -- In performances of Bach, Liszt and Beethoven tinged by a few minor errors and illuminated by individualistic brilliance, Awadagin Pratt, a student at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore, yesterday became the first African-American to win the prestigious Naumburg Competition for young musicians.
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