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BUSINESS
By Laura Pavlenko Lutton and Laura Pavlenko Lutton,MORNINGSTAR.COM | November 26, 2000
Smart shoppers know that some products are cheap for a reason. To get goods off their shelves, stores often mark down items that are out of style or of poor quality. But just because an ugly, falling-apart sweater is on sale doesn't mean that it's a good value. The same holds true for cheap stocks. We wish every stock with an A valuation grade from Morningstar would make a great addition to our portfolios, but not every cheap stock is a sensible investment. We also consider other financial measures, including profitability, to determine if an inexpensive stock is worth buying.
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BUSINESS
July 23, 2009
Online retailer Amazon will acquire shoe seller Zappos Retail giant Amazon.com Inc. said Wednesday that it would acquire Zappos.com Inc., an online footwear and apparel company, in a deal valued at $807 million in stock. The acquisition would expand Amazon's online empire by about 3 million products. Under the terms of the agreement, Amazon will exchange 10 million shares for all of Zappos' outstanding shares and assume all options and warrants. The stock transaction is worth about $807 million based on the average closing price for the 45 trading days ended July 17, Amazon said.
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BUSINESS
June 15, 1997
Techies: Seven out of 10 women in the workplace view technology as a powerful equalizer on the economic playing field between men and women, according to a survey for Avon Products. Eighty-seven percent of the 400 women surveyed cited training in technology as a key before entering the workplace; 75 percent attribute a recent job advancement to their use and familiarity with technology; and 73 percent say technology has helped them achieve professional goals they would otherwise have found unattainable.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 13, 2005
I need to get this out. My cousins, Vinnie and Eddie Voci, will close on the sale of Uncle Gene's cottage on Cape Cod tomorrow, and I'm pretty bummed out about the whole thing -- accepting it, but still bummed -- and I hope you won't mind the use of this space for a kind of elegy. I admit to being a baby boomer tossed into the mosh pit of middle age. Some guys drown in the melancholy. I get to write my way out of it, at least for a day or so. What I tell my kids: Savor every stupid and silly thing that happens; savor family and savor friends.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2009
Online retailer Amazon will acquire shoe seller Zappos Retail giant Amazon.com Inc. said Wednesday that it would acquire Zappos.com Inc., an online footwear and apparel company, in a deal valued at $807 million in stock. The acquisition would expand Amazon's online empire by about 3 million products. Under the terms of the agreement, Amazon will exchange 10 million shares for all of Zappos' outstanding shares and assume all options and warrants. The stock transaction is worth about $807 million based on the average closing price for the 45 trading days ended July 17, Amazon said.
BUSINESS
By Dewanna Lofton and Dewanna Lofton,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 1995
COLUMBIA, S.C. -- A survey of women business owners and corporate executives debunks recent reports that they are unhappy and unable to balance their personal and professional lives.The study, conducted for Avon Products Inc., showed that a large majority of women business owners or executives are satisfied with their careers."Our findings seem to contradict the prevailing myth of the modern woman whose work situation never seems to measure up to her expectations," said Nancy Glaser, vice president of Avon Products.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | February 5, 1995
Donna C. Wilson, a former executive with Avon Products, has been named director of development and visitor services at the Walters Art Gallery.In her new position, Ms. Wilson will coordinate all fund-raising and visitor-service activities and also oversee annual giving, grant applications, membership, special events and rentals, graphic design and publications, marketing and public relations and the government liaison office of the museum.At Avon Products, she was senior director of marketplacedevelopment and director of new business development and also directed the firm's international business planning.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 30, 1996
To say this is a story of coincidence is really to demean it and the three women involved. So I'll do what few columnists, in our determination to be hip or hard-boiled, ever do. I'll declare, right from the start, that what we have here is really a spiritual story. It stems from a little incident on Edmondson Avenue that affirmed, for the three women involved, the power of faith and prayer. It could do some good for those who read it, too.For starters, here's what you need to know: Millie Hartley is an Avon representative in Catonsville.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,Contributing Writer | October 24, 1993
CHUISU CHOCALAJA, Guatemala -- Flor de Maria Contreras straightens her sea-foam green suit, wipes the mud off her high heels and raps on the door of a hut, her perfectly painted lips chirping into the mountain air: "Avon calling."Here, in a town unmarked on most maps, 7,500 feet high in the Guatemalan mountains, the cosmetics traffic is flourishing. And in many communities of this poor Central American country, Avon perfume is more readily available than running water.Ms. Contreras, the Avon director for the Quetzaltenango region in western Guatemala, is one of 8,000 Avon Ladies who tote their wares from hut to hut throughout this nation of 9 million people, most of them Mayan Indians.
BUSINESS
By Josh Kurtz and Josh Kurtz,New York Times News Service | December 23, 1990
Every holiday season, the fragrance industry gets nervous. With more than 50 percent of annual sales taking place in the weeks before Christmas -- most in the last two days -- fragrance companies are like children wondering how bountiful their holiday will be.With more than 800 fragrances on the United States market and a notoriously fickle public, the companies seldom experience the blissful state their products are meant to induce.The industry always seems hyperactive, introducing an average of 60 new products a year.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
When news broke yesterday that Hewlett-Packard Co. had ousted its chief executive officer, Carleton S. "Carly" Fiorina, financial Internet message boards went wild, with the name-calling gender-based, at times even sexual and misogynistic. While few experts believed Fiorina was fired because she is a woman, her rise, her performance and ultimately her fall at the $80 billion company was watched closely because of that. For some, Fiorina's forced resignation carried significance, specifically because she was one of the most famous women in corporate America.
BUSINESS
By Laura Pavlenko Lutton and Laura Pavlenko Lutton,MORNINGSTAR.COM | November 26, 2000
Smart shoppers know that some products are cheap for a reason. To get goods off their shelves, stores often mark down items that are out of style or of poor quality. But just because an ugly, falling-apart sweater is on sale doesn't mean that it's a good value. The same holds true for cheap stocks. We wish every stock with an A valuation grade from Morningstar would make a great addition to our portfolios, but not every cheap stock is a sensible investment. We also consider other financial measures, including profitability, to determine if an inexpensive stock is worth buying.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1997
Techies: Seven out of 10 women in the workplace view technology as a powerful equalizer on the economic playing field between men and women, according to a survey for Avon Products. Eighty-seven percent of the 400 women surveyed cited training in technology as a key before entering the workplace; 75 percent attribute a recent job advancement to their use and familiarity with technology; and 73 percent say technology has helped them achieve professional goals they would otherwise have found unattainable.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 30, 1996
To say this is a story of coincidence is really to demean it and the three women involved. So I'll do what few columnists, in our determination to be hip or hard-boiled, ever do. I'll declare, right from the start, that what we have here is really a spiritual story. It stems from a little incident on Edmondson Avenue that affirmed, for the three women involved, the power of faith and prayer. It could do some good for those who read it, too.For starters, here's what you need to know: Millie Hartley is an Avon representative in Catonsville.
BUSINESS
By Dewanna Lofton and Dewanna Lofton,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 1995
COLUMBIA, S.C. -- A survey of women business owners and corporate executives debunks recent reports that they are unhappy and unable to balance their personal and professional lives.The study, conducted for Avon Products Inc., showed that a large majority of women business owners or executives are satisfied with their careers."Our findings seem to contradict the prevailing myth of the modern woman whose work situation never seems to measure up to her expectations," said Nancy Glaser, vice president of Avon Products.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | February 5, 1995
Donna C. Wilson, a former executive with Avon Products, has been named director of development and visitor services at the Walters Art Gallery.In her new position, Ms. Wilson will coordinate all fund-raising and visitor-service activities and also oversee annual giving, grant applications, membership, special events and rentals, graphic design and publications, marketing and public relations and the government liaison office of the museum.At Avon Products, she was senior director of marketplacedevelopment and director of new business development and also directed the firm's international business planning.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 13, 2005
I need to get this out. My cousins, Vinnie and Eddie Voci, will close on the sale of Uncle Gene's cottage on Cape Cod tomorrow, and I'm pretty bummed out about the whole thing -- accepting it, but still bummed -- and I hope you won't mind the use of this space for a kind of elegy. I admit to being a baby boomer tossed into the mosh pit of middle age. Some guys drown in the melancholy. I get to write my way out of it, at least for a day or so. What I tell my kids: Savor every stupid and silly thing that happens; savor family and savor friends.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
When news broke yesterday that Hewlett-Packard Co. had ousted its chief executive officer, Carleton S. "Carly" Fiorina, financial Internet message boards went wild, with the name-calling gender-based, at times even sexual and misogynistic. While few experts believed Fiorina was fired because she is a woman, her rise, her performance and ultimately her fall at the $80 billion company was watched closely because of that. For some, Fiorina's forced resignation carried significance, specifically because she was one of the most famous women in corporate America.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1994
When James E. Preston, chief executive of Avon Products Inc., tries to figure out who his customers will be in the coming decades, he doesn't just see the white suburban housewife of yore. Instead, he sees a racially diverse group of customers who will demand more products -- and, hopefully, buy more products -- than his company ever thought possible.That realization has put Avon at the forefront of a growing number of companies that are developing long-term relationships with suppliers owned by blacks, Hispanics, Asian-Americans and other minorities.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,Contributing Writer | October 24, 1993
CHUISU CHOCALAJA, Guatemala -- Flor de Maria Contreras straightens her sea-foam green suit, wipes the mud off her high heels and raps on the door of a hut, her perfectly painted lips chirping into the mountain air: "Avon calling."Here, in a town unmarked on most maps, 7,500 feet high in the Guatemalan mountains, the cosmetics traffic is flourishing. And in many communities of this poor Central American country, Avon perfume is more readily available than running water.Ms. Contreras, the Avon director for the Quetzaltenango region in western Guatemala, is one of 8,000 Avon Ladies who tote their wares from hut to hut throughout this nation of 9 million people, most of them Mayan Indians.
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