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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A White House commission established because of the crash of TWA Flight 800 will probably go out of existence without determining the feasibility of two significant security steps: matching passengers and bags on domestic flights, and determining which passengers are possible risks and warrant closer scrutiny.The panel, the Commission on Aviation Safety and Security, will meet tomorrow and Tuesday to try to establish a consensus on safety and security recommendations. The group made preliminary recommendations in September but is to make a final report to President Clinton on Feb. 12."
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NEWS
October 5, 2013
I salute letter writer William Akers' brilliant description of congressional Republicans ( "Gangster tactics from the House GOP," Oct 1). Republicans have allowed their far-right, extremist wing - the tea party - to hijack the GOP and to intentionally hurt millions of American workers and their families. We must hold Republicans accountable at the polls for their behavior in 2014, 2016 and thereafter. America will soon default on its debt due to the inactivity of Congress, possibly plunging the country and the world into yet another recession or even a depression.
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NEWS
By Neil Strassman and Neil Strassman,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 3, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- It could be weeks or even months before aviation officials can say what caused the collision Friday night between a USAir Boeing 737 and a SkyWest commuter plane at Los Angeles International Airport.But aviation safety experts outline three scenarios as the most likely."The jet that was landing could have landed on the wrong runway; you might have had the SkyWest taxiing in front of the 737; or youcould have had both airplanes doing exactly what they were told to do," said John Nance, a former commercial airline pilot and author of books on aviation safety.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | August 29, 2006
Frank Todd Taylor, former head of the National Transportation Safety Board, died of renal failure Aug. 20 at Carroll Hospital Center. He was 87. A lifelong resident of Ellicott City, he was a 1938 graduate of St. James School in Hagerstown. He attended Duke University until he enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1941. Mr. Taylor attained the rank of staff sergeant and was assigned as a flight engineer and navigator aboard bombers while stationed in the Aleutian Islands. After World War II, he earned his pilot's license and went to work for J.P. Riddle Co. , a government aeronautic contracting company, flying mail between Miami and Brazil.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | August 29, 2006
Frank Todd Taylor, former head of the National Transportation Safety Board, died of renal failure Aug. 20 at Carroll Hospital Center. He was 87. A lifelong resident of Ellicott City, he was a 1938 graduate of St. James School in Hagerstown. He attended Duke University until he enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1941. Mr. Taylor attained the rank of staff sergeant and was assigned as a flight engineer and navigator aboard bombers while stationed in the Aleutian Islands. After World War II, he earned his pilot's license and went to work for J.P. Riddle Co. , a government aeronautic contracting company, flying mail between Miami and Brazil.
NEWS
October 5, 2013
I salute letter writer William Akers' brilliant description of congressional Republicans ( "Gangster tactics from the House GOP," Oct 1). Republicans have allowed their far-right, extremist wing - the tea party - to hijack the GOP and to intentionally hurt millions of American workers and their families. We must hold Republicans accountable at the polls for their behavior in 2014, 2016 and thereafter. America will soon default on its debt due to the inactivity of Congress, possibly plunging the country and the world into yet another recession or even a depression.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2002
Rudolf Kapustin, a retired National Transportation Safety Board senior investigator who had studied headline-making air crashes for the past 40 years, died yesterday of pancreatic cancer at his Columbia home. He was 76. He combed through the wreckage of disasters including the Air Florida crash at Washington's 14th Street Bridge in Washington. As a private consultant, he studied the Pan American crash at Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988, the TWA crash off Long Island in 1996 and the Swissair crash off Peggys Cove, Nova Scotia, in 1998.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | May 16, 2006
A dispute between the federal government and air traffic controllers, many of whom arrived a quarter-century ago after President Reagan fired their predecessors in a pivotal showdown with organized labor, spilled into public view yesterday. At airports around the country, including Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, controllers handed out leaflets to passengers to present their side of an argument over a proposed five-year contract with the Federal Aviation Administration.
NEWS
September 13, 1996
THE CONVICTION of Ramzi Yousef and two accomplices in a New York court for an atrocity that never occurred is a victory for civil aviation and civil society. It is the fruit of international cooperation in the war against terrorism.Yousef, a 29-year-old engineering graduate who holds many aliases but is considered a Pakistani, faces a life sentence and another trial. He is alleged to be the mastermind of the 1993 New York World Trade Center bombing for which four men have been convicted. He left the country within hours of it.The breakup of the incredible plot -- five men planting bombs on 11 to 24 U.S.-flag and U.S.-bound airliners -- was a lucky accident.
FEATURES
By Arnie Rosenberg and Arnie Rosenberg,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 24, 1997
Air travel remains 21 times safer than driving in a car, according to the National Safety Council.Nevertheless, when a single crash kills hundreds of people, as happened in recently in Guam, consumers begin asking, "How safe is flying? How safe is the airline or aircraft I'll be flying on?"The Federal Aviation Administration evaluates foreign governments' ability to meet aviation-safety standards established by the United Nations and reports its findings on its Web page, but does not rank foreign and domestic airlines by their safety records.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | May 16, 2006
A dispute between the federal government and air traffic controllers, many of whom arrived a quarter-century ago after President Reagan fired their predecessors in a pivotal showdown with organized labor, spilled into public view yesterday. At airports around the country, including Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, controllers handed out leaflets to passengers to present their side of an argument over a proposed five-year contract with the Federal Aviation Administration.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2002
Rudolf Kapustin, a retired National Transportation Safety Board senior investigator who had studied headline-making air crashes for the past 40 years, died yesterday of pancreatic cancer at his Columbia home. He was 76. He combed through the wreckage of disasters including the Air Florida crash at Washington's 14th Street Bridge in Washington. As a private consultant, he studied the Pan American crash at Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988, the TWA crash off Long Island in 1996 and the Swissair crash off Peggys Cove, Nova Scotia, in 1998.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A White House commission established because of the crash of TWA Flight 800 will probably go out of existence without determining the feasibility of two significant security steps: matching passengers and bags on domestic flights, and determining which passengers are possible risks and warrant closer scrutiny.The panel, the Commission on Aviation Safety and Security, will meet tomorrow and Tuesday to try to establish a consensus on safety and security recommendations. The group made preliminary recommendations in September but is to make a final report to President Clinton on Feb. 12."
NEWS
September 13, 1996
THE CONVICTION of Ramzi Yousef and two accomplices in a New York court for an atrocity that never occurred is a victory for civil aviation and civil society. It is the fruit of international cooperation in the war against terrorism.Yousef, a 29-year-old engineering graduate who holds many aliases but is considered a Pakistani, faces a life sentence and another trial. He is alleged to be the mastermind of the 1993 New York World Trade Center bombing for which four men have been convicted. He left the country within hours of it.The breakup of the incredible plot -- five men planting bombs on 11 to 24 U.S.-flag and U.S.-bound airliners -- was a lucky accident.
NEWS
By Neil Strassman and Neil Strassman,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 3, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- It could be weeks or even months before aviation officials can say what caused the collision Friday night between a USAir Boeing 737 and a SkyWest commuter plane at Los Angeles International Airport.But aviation safety experts outline three scenarios as the most likely."The jet that was landing could have landed on the wrong runway; you might have had the SkyWest taxiing in front of the 737; or youcould have had both airplanes doing exactly what they were told to do," said John Nance, a former commercial airline pilot and author of books on aviation safety.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 26, 2002
TAIPEI, Taiwan - A Taiwanese airliner bound for Hong Kong with 225 people aboard disappeared from radar in clear weather and crashed into the sea yesterday afternoon between southern Taiwan and China. Rescue workers quickly reached the wreckage of the Boeing 747 and retrieved six bodies but found no survivors in the initial search. China Airlines Flight 611 left Chiang Kai-shek International Airport in Taipei at 3:08 p.m. with mostly Taiwanese businessmen and tourists on board. Air traffic controllers lost radar contact with the plane at 3:33 p.m., Taiwanese authorities said.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | March 3, 2009
Southwest Airlines has reached a deal with federal regulators that will reduce a proposed fine for aircraft inspection lapses by nearly $3 million. The Federal Aviation Administration said yesterday that under the agreement, Southwest will pay $7.5 million in three installments to settle the penalty, which was originally proposed at $10.2 million last year. The fine stemmed from allegations that the Dallas-based discount airline allowed 46 airplanes on nearly 60,000 flights without performing required inspections for fuselage cracks.
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