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February 14, 1992
"Blacks In Aviation, Then and Now," a monthlong exhibit of the achievements of blacks in aviation, is now open at Baltimore-Washington International Airport.The exhibit, commemorating Black History Month, is sponsored by the Maryland Aviation Administration.Among the people and events it honors are individuals from the Maryland area who have been influential in black aviation.They include John W. Greene Jr., who in 1941 opened the first black-operated airport in the United States, in Prince George's County.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
A collision involving four vehicles closed all northbound lanes on Aviation Boulevard near Dorsey Road, according to state roads officials. And nearby, a vehicle was disabled on the westbound side of Dorsey Road itself. At 8:35 a.m., the Maryland Transit Authority reported good service on all buses and trains. Earlier, a disabled vehicle closed one northbound lane and a shoulder on I-95 and I-395. A collision involving a single vehicle on I-295 at Daisy Avenue in Baltimore County closed one southbound shoulder of the highway.
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NEWS
April 6, 1992
Paul X. McLain, vice president of financial controls at UNC Inc., has recently been given the additional responsibilities of general manager, discontinued operations.McLain's new position will put him in charge of managing non-aviation related businesses owned by the Annapolis-based aviation company that no longer fit the firm's objectives.McLain's career spans more than two decades in financial management. He joined UNC in 1982 as vice president, financial controls.Before joining UNC, he spent 15 years with the international accounting firm of KPMG Peat Marwick.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Gregory Lawrence said Monday he plans to appeal the Maryland Aviation Administration's decision last week to terminate him from his job as BWI Airport's acting fire chief. Lawrence, the first African-American to lead the airport fire department, initially got his job there after complaining about racial discrimination. He feels his termination may be retaliation for that lawsuit he brought against the department more than a decade ago. "I want my job back," he said during a news conference in the Annapolis offices of his attorney, Alan Legum, where he was flanked by more than a dozen African-American leaders and fire officials from around the region.
NEWS
July 11, 2005
Jason Aron Collins, an aviation technician first class in the Navy, died in a motorcycle accident July 3 in Sigonella, Sicily. He was 25. A native of Baltimore, Mr. Collins graduated from Mergenthaler High School in 1997. He immediately enlisted in the Navy and in five years had become a petty officer first class. He was the recipient of two Navy and Marine Corps achievement medals and earned his enlisted aviation warfare specialist pin while serving aboard the USS Carl Vinson. "He was just at the beginning of a long and important career," his commanding officer, Capt.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | February 16, 1992
HAGERSTOWN -- The pouring rain mattered little to the middle school students who gathered at Washington County Regional Airport yesterday.No amount of H2O was going to keep this group of 20 young women from soaking in the sights. They asked questions when given a chance. Tough ones, too.Drawn from schools across this rural county, the students defied the stereotypes that claim only boys can appreciate 12,000 horsepower, super-charged engines, modern aerodynamics and aircraft navigation."I don't think this group of girls is scared of anything," marveled Kathy Holtzman, a mother of two who accompanied her 14-year-old daughter Pam on the outing.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | September 30, 2001
One might think that a company in the business of private and corporate aviation would have little business to speak of after two weeks of airport closures and frightened fliers. But Signature Flight Support, which services general aviation at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, reports just the opposite. At a time when major airlines are laying off thousands of workers, Signature's 40 employees at BWI are scampering to meet increased demand. They serve about 35 flights a day. "It's a different story at Baltimore than at a lot of other airports we serve around the country," said Steve Lee, the Florida company's senior vice president of marketing and business development.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | September 21, 1993
Hugh Schmittle's and Odile Legeay's dream of making planes with movable wings received further credibility yesterday as the owners of Freewing Aircraft accepted a Discover magazine technology award for aviation and aeronautics."
NEWS
By Staff Report | September 2, 1993
Freewing Aircraft Corp., a University of Maryland "incubator" company that has announced plans to move to Carroll County, has been selected by Discover magazine as the aviation and aerospace winner in the 1993 Discover Awards for Technological Innovation.The company was started and nurtured under a university program that supplies technical and business expertise to small but promising operations.Discover, is a monthly magazine on science and technology, with a readership of nearly 5 million.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | March 19, 1992
Small-plane aviators are asking the state to take control of Tipton Army Airfield and open it to the public, while Anne Arundel officialsdecide whether they want to operate a general-aviation airport.Since the Fort Meade Coordinating Council recommended two years ago that Tipton be converted to a county-owned airport, little progress hasbeen made, said former Howard County Executive Edward Cochran.Cochran is one of about a dozen community and business leaders who have organized the Save Tipton Coalition to speed the airport's conversion to a public facility.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
The mother of a 3-year-old boy killed in a northeastern Pennsylvania helicopter crash last month filed the first lawsuit in the accident Friday, seeking unspecified damages from two aviation companies and the pilot's estate. Crystal McKain of Leesburg, Va., sued Virginia-based Hampton Roads Charter Service, alleging that the company acted negligently when it leased the five-seat Robinson helicopter to Towson pilot David E. Jenny Jr. All five aboard were killed in the July 27 crash in Noxen, Pa. The National Transportation Safety Board found this month that Jenny failed to follow federal regulations when he initiated a flight in low-visibility conditions in which he was not certified to fly. He also did not file a flight plan for the trip or obtain a weather briefing, the NTSB said.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
For passengers waiting to catch a plane or folks waiting for someone on a plane, the surroundings at BWI Marshall Airport improved Friday morning with the opening of the two-story observation gallery near Concourse C. The waiting area, part of the $100 million upgrade scheduled for completion this year, has rocking chairs and recharging stations, a playground, a tapas bar with sweeping views of the runways, and an aviation museum with a 28-foot NASA...
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Robo Raven is making aviation history - again. The robotic bird's maiden flights in December were a first in the history of flying machines, but lasted only seconds inside the Reckord Armory at the University of Maryland, College Park. Now the mylar and carbon fiber contraption is back, soaring higher, longer and more accurately - the first machine ever built that flies on wings that can move independently of each other, as real birds' do. "Nobody has flown anything with independent wing control," before, said S.K. Gupta, a professor of mechanical engineering in the A. James Clark School of Engineering at College Park.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Fifi is no shrinking violet. The 68-year-old warplane can't sky like it used to, and getting all the parts going in the morning takes a little more thought and planning. But Fifi - the last B-29 Superfortress still in the air - commands respect, with super-charged engines that growl with authority and menacing gun turrets that appear ready to fend off swarming enemy fighters. The plane did, after all, have more than a bit part in "The Right Stuff," standing in as the mother ship for test pilot Chuck Yeager's first supersonic flight.
EXPLORE
May 6, 2013
The Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum has been taking the Glenn L. Martin Company rocket age history on the road to Harford County. Thanks to support from the Dresher Foundation, the museum is offering its outreach STEM education program "From Sand Dunes to the Moon" to third grade classes at Harford County elementary schools. This interactive activity celebrating flight and Maryland's contribution to the pioneering days of manned space exploration is designed to launch excitement for aerospace possibilities as it inspires students to explore the future of aviation while they discover and learn to appreciate the technological wonders of the past.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
While the U.S. House of Representatives on Friday approved a Senate plan to avoid furloughs of air traffic controlllers, positions responsible for weather observation at BWI Marshall Airport and other airports across the country are at risk. The Federal Aviation Administration is considering cutting what are known as contract weather observers, who supplement automated meteorologic observation at airports around the country. The observers aren't necessarily meteorologists but they can help verify or expand on forecasting data.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2000
Scott E. Muntean, a pilot and co-owner of Lynn Aviation on Kent Island, died Thursday of a brain tumor at his Severna Park home. He was 45. Mr. Muntean, a former physicist, had been the owner of Round Bay Engineering Co., which represented the aerospace electronic industry. Since 1997, aviation had been his full-time occupation. He co-owned Lynn Aviation with his wife, Nancy Lynn, a nationally known aerobatic flight instructor whom he married in 1983. Lynn Aviation is at Bay Bridge Airport on Kent Island, where Mr. Muntean sold and modified high-performance aircraft.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2005
Thomas Shepherd Hook, a nationally known aviation historian and author who chronicled in several books the Navy's ill-fated dirigible program of the 1920s and '30s, died of lung cancer Thursday at the Mays Chapel home of a friend. He was 81, and formerly a longtime Hampden resident. Mr. Hook was born in Baltimore and raised in Ruxton. He became interested in aviation while attending Gunston School near Centreville in the early 1930s. "At school, a number of our friends' dads were Navy pilots, including several who flew the biplanes that were aboard the lighter-than-air ships Macon and Shenandoah, and Tom was just fascinated with them," said J. Thomas Martin, a lifelong friend and retired marine manufacturers' representative.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
The runway at Martin State Airport fell away as the distant Baltimore skyline popped into view. A hint of turbulence jittered the pilot's seat during a banking maneuver that filled the cockpit windshield with the vast blueness of the Chesapeake Bay. After a quick series of adjustments and a moment of indecision came the satisfying thump of wheels touching down. It felt mighty good to be back on the ground. But then again, the student never left. At Middle River Aviation, instructors can teach the fundamentals of flight in an airplane or in a new full-motion simulator that pitches and rolls in every direction - even straight into a death spiral.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
Massive girders and freshly poured concrete form a bump in the middle of the low-slung terminal, almost as if BWI Marshall Airport is expecting. In a way, it is. Before next summer, a glassed-in walkway, new shops and a modern security checkpoint will spring from the framework. Passengers will be able to get from the concourses used by Southwest and AirTran to the one used by American and Spirit without leaving security. By the time summer is out, the oldest part of BWI will be modernized and directly connected to the busiest part.
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