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Avenue Market

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Lorraine Mirabella | October 26, 2012
The Avenue Market on Baltimore's Pennsylvania Avenue has a new look and new vendors and will re-open with $500,000 worth of renovations next week. The new stalls will sell seafood, poultry, deli, bakery, floral and other goods, according to Baltimore Public Markets, the non-profit group that runs five of the city's old-style markets, among them Broadway and Cross Street markets.  The Avenue Market, at 1700 Pennsylvania Avenue, was known as the Lafayette Market when it opened in December 1871.
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | May 10, 2013
When Christa Daring was a student, she rode a bus from her Waverly home and crossed North Avenue on her way to classes at the Baltimore School for the Arts. "This was always oh-so no-man's land," she said of the commercial crosstown street that is taking some convincing steps this spring as an arts district. She stood in the old North Avenue Market building, where she and fellow members of the Red Emma's Bookstore and Coffeehouse collective will be moving from Mount Vernon to a much enlarged space.
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NEWS
September 30, 1999
WHEN Avenue Market opened nearly three years ago, some hailed it as the first step in the rebirth of once-fabled Pennsylvania Avenue. But today, the enterprise is failing. The colorful, African-style market has struggled to attract tenants. Its mix of fresh produce, fast-food stalls and miscellaneous merchandise hasn't lured many customers. Some $4 million in state, city and private funds paid for the transformation of the former Lafayette Market into the Afrocentric bazaar.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 26, 2012
The Avenue Market on Baltimore's Pennsylvania Avenue has a new look and new vendors and will re-open with $500,000 worth of renovations next week. The new stalls will sell seafood, poultry, deli, bakery, floral and other goods, according to Baltimore Public Markets, the non-profit group that runs five of the city's old-style markets, among them Broadway and Cross Street markets.  The Avenue Market, at 1700 Pennsylvania Avenue, was known as the Lafayette Market when it opened in December 1871.
BUSINESS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
In less than two weeks, the struggling Avenue Market in West Baltimore will be under new management, but skeptical merchants aren't sure that will make a difference. Baltimore Public Markets Corp., which already manages several of the city's markets, will take over effective Feb. 1, said John Paterakis, chairman of the corporation's board. The market is now managed by the Avenue Market Corp., which receives city funding and was established under then-Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. "I imagine the city will pick up whatever money that's owed, and then we will go in there with a clean slate and try to run it," Paterakis said.
NEWS
September 20, 1997
NINE MONTHS AFTER OPENING, Upton's African-American showpiece emporium -- the Avenue Market -- is half-empty. The complex itself is attractive and clean as a result of a $4 million redesign and rehabilitation. But the festiveness suggested by flags of African nations is lost with so many stalls having never been occupied.The market has generated so little traffic that the rents of its merchants were reduced recently. Despite that action, some say they will go out of business, unless patronage improves.
NEWS
December 19, 1996
AS A STRUCTURE, the Avenue Market inside the shell of the old Lafayette Market sparkles after a thorough $4 million redesign and rehabilitation. It is airy, attractive and clean.Despite a ribbon-cutting last weekend, the market is still largely vacant. This is not good -- even though construction delays are understandable. Many of the 40 stall operators are first-time business people and now miss the benefits of the traditionally busy Christmas and Kwanzaa shopping rush.In spite of tens of millions of dollars spent on urban renewal since 1967, revitalization of Upton has been elusive.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
Merchants in West Baltimore's Avenue Market will be able to negotiate rent forgiveness and lease changes with management, Zed Smith, the market's private manager, said last night.Fearing financial failure because of a lack of customers, merchants in the Afro-centric marketplace had requested a meeting last night to press their concerns.Smith's comments came after he met with about 20 merchants for about an hour.Last week, Smith refused to comment on merchants' requests for financial concessions.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1997
Merchants at the beleaguered Avenue Market in West Baltimore are paying reduced rents under an agreement signed recently with the market's management.The pact settles a lawsuit filed by the merchants in June, claiming the market's nonprofit owner and private management intentionally misrepresented the market's prospects in an effort to get businesses to open there."The merchants are happy we don't have those high rents over our heads right now, and we're looking forward to seeing more advertisements to let people know we're here," Stephanie Kidwell, president of the market's merchants association, said yesterday.
NEWS
October 16, 1999
THREE YEARS ago, when the city gave the old Lafayette Market a $4 million face lift and renamed it Avenue Market, hopes ran high that the newly created venture would become the centerpiece of Pennsylvania Avenue renewal.That has not happened. Instead, the West Baltimore market is in such dire straits that the city recently had to funnel a $200,000 emergency allocation just to keep the electricity on.Worse still, no turnaround is in sight.Hundreds of nearby rowhouses have been allowed to deteriorate or are vacant in anticipation of a huge redevelopment project centering on the demolished Murphy Homes public housing project.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | April 25, 2009
Baltimore is often changing before your eyes. I was reminded of this as I talked with Maryland Institute College of Art students as they readied a part of the old North Avenue Market for an event to be held this evening at 6 and 9 at 12 W. North Ave. The show, or "multimedia, experimental fashion event" is called "Brouhaha: A Six-Alarm Affair." The title is a reference to the six-alarm fire that destroyed the old market in August 1968. Parts of this cavernous landmark were immediately repaired.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2008
It's been decades since a fire burned out the once-bustling North Avenue Market, where more than 200 vendors hawked meat and seafood, produce and sandwiches. A bowling alley filled the second floor. And now, say developers who own the distinctive building in a long-deteriorating stretch of midtown Baltimore, it's time for people to start coming back. A development team that includes a longtime market landlord and the owner of the nearby Charles Theatre building has launched a $1 million project to restore the 1928 landmark, which was built to house the market.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 9, 2002
NO ONE CAN accuse this Mitchell of sitting down on the job. There he was Tuesday, standing on the corner of Pennsylvania Avenue and Laurens Street. Keiffer Mitchell, one of the City Council's 4th District representatives, stood with the sleeves of his light-blue shirt rolled up slightly above the wrists, chatting with constituents in front of a long desk and about four chairs that served as his makeshift office for a day. An orange sign with black letters that read "4 in the Fourth: Taking back our communities one corner at a time" hung from the table.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2002
This is the way a business ends, with Larry A. Makowski's rapid-fire tongue calling out the bids as a handful of cautious buyers look on, hoping this bankruptcy auction yields a good deal. Carlton Brown, 55, whose two businesses at the Avenue Market were being sold last week, stood to the side, talking with his lawyer. Five years of trying to make a go of it on Pennsylvania Avenue had played out, and with it went a $160,000 investment. "This is the end of an era, and this is the way it ends," he said.
BUSINESS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
In less than two weeks, the struggling Avenue Market in West Baltimore will be under new management, but skeptical merchants aren't sure that will make a difference. Baltimore Public Markets Corp., which already manages several of the city's markets, will take over effective Feb. 1, said John Paterakis, chairman of the corporation's board. The market is now managed by the Avenue Market Corp., which receives city funding and was established under then-Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. "I imagine the city will pick up whatever money that's owed, and then we will go in there with a clean slate and try to run it," Paterakis said.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2000
After more than two months of police sweeps and hundreds of arrests, the city's effort to eradicate open-air drug dealing in a 20-block area near West Baltimore's Avenue Market has slashed crime there but divided the community over police tactics. In one of 10 city drug areas that Mayor Martin O'Malley hopes to clear by June, police report serious crime down 23 percent and drug-related calls down 32 percent this year, compared with the same period last year. But the scores of Druid Heights and Upton drug addicts who continue to feed their habits and the dealers who pad their wallets with money say the operation has had little effect on them.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1996
There were insistent rhythms of a steel band; rich harmonies, courtesy of a gospel choir; and stirring speeches from a bevy of dignitaries.But most of the excitement at yesterday's grand opening of the renovated Avenue Market in West Baltimore's economically distressed Upton community was generated by the customers who came to shop, and the merchants who served them."
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2000
Wally Simms has been blind for 37 years, but he can sense with his ears and walking stick that the Central Police District's 3-week-old campaign to clear Pennsylvania Avenue around the Avenue Market of drugs is working. "It is much safer. You feel free to walk around," said Simms as he bumped into an officer stationed in front of the Avenue Market subway stop. "I got friends telling me this area is hot with cops." Three blocks from the Pennsylvania Avenue bustle -- where blocks once lined with scores of addicts and street peddlers are now peppered with shoppers -- Druid Heights residents also say that police efforts are working and that they are reclaiming their neighborhood, where police responded to 975 drug calls last year.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2000
Wally Simms has been blind for 37 years, but he can sense with his ears and walking stick that the Central Police District's 3-week-old campaign to clear Pennsylvania Avenue around the Avenue Market of drugs is working. "It is much safer. You feel free to walk around," said Simms as he bumped into an officer stationed in front of the Avenue Market subway stop. "I got friends telling me this area is hot with cops." Three blocks from the Pennsylvania Avenue bustle -- where blocks once lined with scores of addicts and street peddlers are now peppered with shoppers -- Druid Heights residents also say that police efforts are working and that they are reclaiming their neighborhood, where police responded to 975 drug calls last year.
NEWS
October 16, 1999
THREE YEARS ago, when the city gave the old Lafayette Market a $4 million face lift and renamed it Avenue Market, hopes ran high that the newly created venture would become the centerpiece of Pennsylvania Avenue renewal.That has not happened. Instead, the West Baltimore market is in such dire straits that the city recently had to funnel a $200,000 emergency allocation just to keep the electricity on.Worse still, no turnaround is in sight.Hundreds of nearby rowhouses have been allowed to deteriorate or are vacant in anticipation of a huge redevelopment project centering on the demolished Murphy Homes public housing project.
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