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ENTERTAINMENT
By Patrick Goldstein and Tribune newspapers | January 8, 2010
I t's no secret that "Avatar" has been stunningly successful on nearly every front. The James Cameron-directed sci-fi epic is already the fourth-highest-grossing film of all time, having earned more than $1 billion around the globe in less than three weeks of theatrical release. The film also has garnered effusive praise from critics, who've been planting its flag on a variety of critics Top 10 lists (it has earned an impressive 83 score on Rotten Tomatoes). The 3-D trip to Pandora is also viewed as a veritable shoo-in for a best picture Oscar nomination when the academy announces its nominees on Feb. 2. But amid this avalanche of praise and popularity, guess who hates the movie?
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | December 23, 2013
So rednecks need to be politically correct now? Wait, before the National Association of Rednecked Persons attacks me, let me be clear that I don't mean "redneck" as an insult. Indeed, Redneck Pride has been on the rise ever since Jeff Foxworthy got rich informing people they "might be a redneck. " (Some clues: if your school fight song was "Dueling Banjos;" if you've ever raked leaves in your kitchen; if your boat hasn't left your driveway for 15 years; if birds are attracted to your beard, etc.)
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NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | March 4, 2007
In real life, she is bound to her home by ill health. But in the digital world of Second Life, the woman known as Circe Broom has parlayed her gifts as a land speculator into a career as an acclaimed music impresario. A lavishly built avatar with an auburn mane and a heart of gold, Broom presides over several Second Life stages, where jazz, country and classical musicians from around the world perform live through streaming software. Other avatars, draped in glittering jewels and cyber finery, flock to Broom's productions at the Luxor stage, Hummingbird Cafe and Club Egret.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lefavor, For The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Facebook may have a lot of uses for social networking and time-wasting, but lately it's been offering a creative outlet, too. A new comic-making application called Bitstrips is popping up more and more on Facebook updates. And after just a few months, Bitstrips has turned into something that everyone seems to be talking about. "Basically, it's an app that turns you and your friends into a cast of cartoon characters," explains Jacob Blackstock, Bitstrips' chief executive and creative director.
FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,Tribune Newspapers | November 27, 2009
Forget the flying dragons and giant blue aliens: Sam Worthington is in search of human life amid all that extraterrestrial spectacle in "Avatar." Director James Cameron's sci-fi epic arrives Dec. 18 amid intense discussion of its state-of-the-art performance capture and 3-D innovations, but for Worthington, the 33-year-old Australian star of the film, none of that is as important as locating the human heart in the story. "I don't believe there's a certain way to act in an action blockbuster, and I think it's a mistake to approach it that way," Worthington said.
FEATURES
October 19, 2007
Critic's Pick -- Aang and his friends face off against a new adversary in Avatar: The Last Airbender (8:30 p.m., Nickelodeon).
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lefavor, For The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Facebook may have a lot of uses for social networking and time-wasting, but lately it's been offering a creative outlet, too. A new comic-making application called Bitstrips is popping up more and more on Facebook updates. And after just a few months, Bitstrips has turned into something that everyone seems to be talking about. "Basically, it's an app that turns you and your friends into a cast of cartoon characters," explains Jacob Blackstock, Bitstrips' chief executive and creative director.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2007
Downloaded singles 1.Kiss Kiss, Chris Brown featuring T-Pain 2.Apologize, Timbaland featuring OneRepublic 3.Crank That (Soulja Boy), Soulja Boy Tell 'Em 4.Bubbly, Colbie Caillat 5.No One, Alicia Keys[ITUNES (OCT. 29)] Downloaded albums 1.Carnival Ride, Carrie Underwood 2.Raising Sand, Robert Plant and Alison Krauss 3.Across the Universe soundtrack, Various artists 4.Coco, Colbie Caillat 5.Mothership (remastered), Led Zeppelin[ITUNES (OCT. 29)] Downloaded TV episodes 1.The Handmaiden's Tale, Gossip Girl 2.Haunt You Every Day, Grey's Anatomy 3.Imaginationland Episode II, Family Guy 4.Imaginationland, Family Guy 5.The Avatar and the Firelord, Avatar: The Last Airbender[ITUNES (OCT.
NEWS
By Andrei Codrescu | July 1, 1997
NEW ORLEANS -- Human beings have investments in certain words. Certain words are banks in whose vaults we have stored our meager spirits, hoping to reap an investment some day. Take two of these: ''icon'' and ''avatar.''''Icon,'' having it's origin in the Greek ''image,'' has grown over time to mean the representation of a cherished image, the visible form of the invisible. People have worshiped icons and entrusted them with their prayers. Icons came in a bewildering variety, from painted canvases and marble sculptures, to stones and trees, mountains and sacred sites.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | December 11, 2009
The Fantastic Mr. Fox . . ( 3 STARS) George Clooney and Meryl Streep give, paws down, their best performances of the year as the voices of the risk-taking fox and his long-suffering wife in Wes Anderson's hugely charming puppet-animated feature, which also features a scene-stealing turn from Bill Murray as Mr. Fox's lawyer, Clive Badger. The movie is unexpected in every way. The stop-motion animation proves hilariously inventive. And the combination of family comedy-drama and caper movie (Mr. Fox, though a journalist, can't resist raiding the larders of neighboring farmers)
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 21, 2013
"We need to buy a movie studio. " Amid the umpteen conferences, panels, meetings and informal conversations in the wake of the presidential election, this idea has been a near constant among conservatives who feel like the country is slipping through their fingers. Mitt Romney and the Republican National Committee combined raised just more than $1 billion, and all we got are these lousy T-shirts. Since conservatives are losing the culture, goes the argument, which in turn leads to losing at politics, maybe that money could be better spent on producing some cultural ammo of our own?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patrick Goldstein and Tribune newspapers | January 8, 2010
I t's no secret that "Avatar" has been stunningly successful on nearly every front. The James Cameron-directed sci-fi epic is already the fourth-highest-grossing film of all time, having earned more than $1 billion around the globe in less than three weeks of theatrical release. The film also has garnered effusive praise from critics, who've been planting its flag on a variety of critics Top 10 lists (it has earned an impressive 83 score on Rotten Tomatoes). The 3-D trip to Pandora is also viewed as a veritable shoo-in for a best picture Oscar nomination when the academy announces its nominees on Feb. 2. But amid this avalanche of praise and popularity, guess who hates the movie?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 18, 2009
"Avatar," the most high-profile, fiercely debated and expensive 3-D film in history, is poised to become something more than a conversation piece or a mega-blockbuster. If its writer-director, James Cameron, manages to flood the pop-cultural mainstream as he did with his last film, "Titanic," it could transform the way people view entertainment not just on movie screens but on TVs and personal computers. David Modell, former president and CEO of the Baltimore Ravens and now chairman of the board of the technology company 3ality Digital, thinks the game has already changed.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 18, 2009
Avatar," the most high-profile, fiercely debated and expensive 3-D film in history, is poised to become something more than a conversation piece or a mega-blockbuster. If its writer-director, James Cameron, manages to flood the pop-cultural mainstream as he did with his last film, "Titanic," it could transform the way people view entertainment not just on movie screens but on TVs and personal computers. David Modell, former president and CEO of the Baltimore Ravens and now chairman of the board of the technology company 3ality Digital, thinks the game has already changed.
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Tribune Newspapers | December 17, 2009
Blue is the new green, if the billion-or-more box-office predictions come true for James Cameron's first feature since "Titanic" 12 years ago. So. Does it look like a billion? It does, yes. But folks, I haven't experienced such a clear dividing line within a blockbuster in years. The first 90 minutes of "Avatar" - which opens at midnight tonight at several Baltimore theaters - are pretty terrific. It's a full-immersion technological wonder, with wonders to spare. The other 72 minutes, less and less terrific.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | December 11, 2009
The Fantastic Mr. Fox . . ( 3 STARS) George Clooney and Meryl Streep give, paws down, their best performances of the year as the voices of the risk-taking fox and his long-suffering wife in Wes Anderson's hugely charming puppet-animated feature, which also features a scene-stealing turn from Bill Murray as Mr. Fox's lawyer, Clive Badger. The movie is unexpected in every way. The stop-motion animation proves hilariously inventive. And the combination of family comedy-drama and caper movie (Mr. Fox, though a journalist, can't resist raiding the larders of neighboring farmers)
NEWS
By ROBERT BENJAMIN | December 10, 2005
Tired of your dreary job? Miss out on the housing boom? Your social life need a boost? While we're at it, want a whole new persona - appearance, clothes, skills? It's now possible in cyberspace. Just go virtual. And it appears that you now might be able to make some real money there. Or so suggests the unfolding (and perhaps cautionary) tale of Jon Jacobs, more widely known by the name of his alter ego or virtual avatar, "Neverdie." Read on skeptically. Mr. Jacobs, a 39-year-old Londoner now living in Miami Beach, has been scratching around in the cutthroat reality of the independent film world since 1987.
FEATURES
By Geoff Boucher and Geoff Boucher,Tribune Newspapers | November 27, 2009
Forget the flying dragons and giant blue aliens: Sam Worthington is in search of human life amid all that extraterrestrial spectacle in "Avatar." Director James Cameron's sci-fi epic arrives Dec. 18 amid intense discussion of its state-of-the-art performance capture and 3-D innovations, but for Worthington, the 33-year-old Australian star of the film, none of that is as important as locating the human heart in the story. "I don't believe there's a certain way to act in an action blockbuster, and I think it's a mistake to approach it that way," Worthington said.
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