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By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | October 13, 2011
This year's display of fall foliage should be exceptionally attractive, because we've had plenty of rainfall as well as the warm afternoons and chilly evenings required during early fall to produce vivid leaf pigments. Long ago and far away, though, the Wyandots, native American farmers and hunters living alongside Canada's St. Lawrence River, had their own reason for why leaves change colors during fall. The Wyandots believed that a fight over food took place one autumn between a spirit deer and a spirit bear that lived in "the land of the sky. " As blood from the bear and deer rained down from the sky, leaves were stained shades of reds and yellows.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
It has begun to feel like fall, with schools in session and a chill in the air, but the season actually arrives at the moment of autumnal equinox at 10:29 p.m. Monday. At that instant, Earth will be rotating upright on its axis, giving the northern and southern hemispheres equal sunlight and making the length of day and night roughly equal. In Baltimore, the sun will stay up for 12 hours or more until Friday. It's the tilt of the Earth's axis that gives us seasons -- at the winter solstice, the axis is tilted 23.5 degrees away from the sun, and at the summer solstice, it's tilted 23.5 degrees away from the sun. Meteorological fall started Sept.
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September 19, 2012
Peace be with you, dear readers, Today marks the International Day of Peace, established by a United Nations resolution in 1982. Tomorrow, happy autumn! Officially, Sept. 22 is the first day of autumn. It's time to enjoy colorful leaves, pumpkins, fall harvests and turkeys, among other things. Acquire your fall harvest at Havre de Grace Farmers Market, 450 Pennington Ave., Saturdays through October, 9 a.m. to noon. September is National Honey Month. Celebrate with your honey and buy fresh honey at the farmers market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
It all started with a number: 49. Peter Bruun, a Copenhagen, Denmark-born artist who has made Baltimore his home since 1987, created a series of 49 drawings two years ago. "I thought at the time that they were simple sketches," Bruun says. "I then realized that I was 49, soon to turn 50. No one would know looking at those 49 drawings that they addressed life passing, but that's what I saw in them - the dawning awareness that you have a life behind you, and a finite horizon ahead.
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY DAVID HOBBY and PHOTOS BY DAVID HOBBY,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | November 18, 2005
Maple leaves in Oakland Mills (left) and Hickory Ridge (below) show off brilliant colors, while a sweet- gum tree in Owen Brown prepares to drop its prickly seeds.
NEWS
By Sandy Moser | November 13, 1992
I PASS their outposts on my way to work: teen-agers and children, communities of them, clustered around stop signs, or inside metal shelters, or at the ends of driveways.The larger groups lean and laugh against one another, while the single children -- the only youngsters on their street or block, jiggle their thin knees for warmth. On very cold mornings I watch them rub webs of frost from the backs of metal street signs.And from my cracked window, rolled down an inch for circulation, I can smell it: cold and certain, as crisp as milk from a metal cup.Autumn smells like independence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Eric Coble's dark-funny play "The Velocity of Autumn," a popular and critical success at Arena Stage in a potent production starring Estelle Parsons and directed by Molly Smith back in the fall, is heading to Broadway next April. The staging will mark the Broadway debuts of Coble and Smith, Arena's artistic director.  It's the 20th Arena staging to get a Broadway showing in the D.C. company's 63 years. "Velocity" will start previews April 1 at the Booth Theatre and open April 21 for what its being called a limited engagement.
NEWS
By Barbara Tufty | October 16, 1996
NOW IN THIS GOLDEN season of the year, wondrous whirs and cricking sounds echo through the cooling air.As you walk along a country road or stand quietly at the edge of a field, or sit in a back yard, take time to listen to those minuscule chirps, trills, snaps, crackles, buzzes, whirs, scrapes. These are vibrations of autumn insects -- all singing their song before the winter overwhelms. It's the male way of attracting a mate in order to pass along a 200-million-year lineage in their genes and produce next spring's generation.
NEWS
By Ila G. Phillips | October 7, 1993
ALL around me was the look of autumn. Beyond my now-deserted patio lay the wind-swept pier, looking dull and gray above the chill water, while my empty rowboat tugged dejectedly at the tide with a slow, lapping sound.Implicit with my use of her this year had been the recognition that it would have to be her last, her flaking green innards having lost their battle to relentless rotting. So now, past summer, my rowboat waited and fixed me with a remorseful eye, denied the same flight to freedom as the wild geese, honking ever southward along their flyways.
NEWS
By BARBARA TUFTY | October 27, 1993
Washington. -- Yesterday October flung down her golden gauntlet and bade summer begone to Outer Space. Now autumn begins to kindle the Appalachian mountains with blazing colors and change the behavior of plants, birds, insects and humans.Now begins that time of year when . . .. . . the first frost scorches the leaves with red and gold, knocks the petals off the nasturtiums, but hasn't yet struck deep enough to douse the light of the marigolds and purple asters.. . . the crickets slow down their chirpings and grow faint, but still ring out urgent signals to mate before winter death, to pass along a million-year legacy of genetic codes to the next generation.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
City officials say the insurance program for broken water pipes they've been publicizing likely won't be available for several months, and possibly not until autumn. Baltimore first announced the insurance - which officials call a service contract - last year in connection with the approval of a system-wide overhaul of water meters, warning residents they would want to buy the insurance in case pipes break during the work. Kurt Kocher, a spokesman for Baltimore Department of Public Works, said recently there is a very small chance pipes could break during the overhaul of about 400,000 water meters in Baltimore City and Baltimore County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Eric Coble's dark-funny play "The Velocity of Autumn," a popular and critical success at Arena Stage in a potent production starring Estelle Parsons and directed by Molly Smith back in the fall, is heading to Broadway next April. The staging will mark the Broadway debuts of Coble and Smith, Arena's artistic director.  It's the 20th Arena staging to get a Broadway showing in the D.C. company's 63 years. "Velocity" will start previews April 1 at the Booth Theatre and open April 21 for what its being called a limited engagement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
On a recent Saturday night, diners strode into Charleston 's main dining room with confident smiles. They couldn't wait for the evening to start. They knew, either firsthand or by reputation, that they were in extremely capable hands. When Charleston opened in 1997, diners were primed for something wonderful. The new restaurant's co-owners, Cindy Wolf and Tony Foreman, were coming off a first success, Savannah, in the Admiral Fell Inn. When Savannah closed, Wolf and Foreman took a chance on a nearby Lancaster Street location.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Earth reaches the autumnal equinox at 4:44 p.m. Sunday, marking the start of fall in the Northern Hemisphere and spring in the Southern Hemisphere. At the equinox, the Earth is spinning upright relative to the sun -- this only happens twice a year because the Earth's axis is tilted by 23.5 degrees. During our fall and winter, the axis is tilted away from the sun, while during spring and summer the North Pole is tilted toward the sun, giving us more direct sunlight and warmth. (The axis always points the same direction, as the above graphic explains; its orientation relative to the sun just changes as the planet revolves around the sun.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Alexandra, who has been feeling all of her 79 years, sits in her Brooklyn brownstone surrounded by bottles filled with flammable liquid. She keeps a Zippo lighter ever at the ready.  No one, but no one, is going to get her out of her home. Yes, she knows that she is, well -- "Dwindling. That's the word I settled on," she says. So all she wants is to finish out her days with "a little touch of grace. " As portrayed by venerable actress Estelle Parsons in Eric Coble's funny-bittersweet new play "The Velocity of Autumn" at Arena Stage, Alexandra is a startling force -- wry, wise, wistful, obsessive, compulsive, angry, a little spiteful.
NEWS
August 25, 2013
Fall is approaching and this summer, with all the rain, has been kind to my lawn. What should I be thinking about doing as the seasons change? Carrie Engel of Valley View Farms in Cockeysville says now is a good time to get rid of any perennial weeds. She recommends Crab-E-Rad. Then, in a few weeks when the weather is cooler, it will be safe to seed. "Don't worry about the crabgrass," she said. "It's an annual and if you apply pre-emergent crabgrass preventer next spring, it will take care of it. " But the summer rains have given the other weeds what they need to thrive.
NEWS
By BARBARA TUFTY | October 23, 1992
Washington. -- Get along with you, little flame-like bird, you're late. Summer slipped by weeks ago, and now your food sources of gerardia and honeysuckle are drying. Only a lingering blossom of phlox or cardinal flower can offer you that drop of nectar you need to energize your whirring wings. You're the last hummingbird to circle the sugar-water feeder, that strange attracter where many of your species zoomed in parabolic splendor this summer. They have gone, and only you, heading down from the north, poke at its viscous liquid.
NEWS
By Barbara Simon | December 16, 1994
These are my children, a hodgepodgeof students strewn like leaves among my classroom's skeletal desks.Arbitrarily assorted into my care,my students look to mefor answers about a worldhardly understood. They try,these kids, staring straightand unflinching down the longbore of life in the late20th century.Damaged by the fall from childhoodinto adolescence, they face downa world gone crazy for the individual, yetuniformly homogenized, a placewhere gold chains and gunscreate the man. They believein violence the way I onceheld to books and family.
SPORTS
By Colleen Thomas and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2013
A former two-time first-team Baltimore Sun All-Metro honoree is running her way to the same status as just a freshman on the Harvard women's track and field team. Autumne Franklin captured the 400 hurdles title at the USA Track and Field Junior National Championships on Saturday. The McDonogh graduate capped her stellar freshman season with the personal-best finish of 57.10 in the event, the fastest time run by a junior in the world this season. Her win also earned her the chance to represent the U.S. at the Pan-Am Junior Championships in Colombia in August.
HEALTH
By Mindy Athas, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
A nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center regularly provides a guest post. This week, Mindy Athas weighs in on apples. Finding fresh, local and tasty ripe apples in the fall is easy. May some apple wisdom fall upon your head. Apple Appeal: Part of the rose family and related to plums, peaches and almonds, apples are one of the oldest and most widely cultivated tree fruits. Originating in Asia and later in Europe, apple trees were brought to North America by colonists in the 17th century (the only native versions are crab apples)
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