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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
John Franzone Jr., founder of a Hunt Valley plastics manufacturing company who combined his love of the outdoors with flying, died July 19 of heart failure at his Timonium home. He was 93. The son of parents from Italy and Scotland, John Franzone Jr. was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and later moved with his family to Fort Montgomery in upstate New York. It was while living there near Bear Mountain that Mr. Franzone began his lifelong passion for the outdoors as he roamed the fields and woods fishing and hunting.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
John Franzone Jr., founder of a Hunt Valley plastics manufacturing company who combined his love of the outdoors with flying, died July 19 of heart failure at his Timonium home. He was 93. The son of parents from Italy and Scotland, John Franzone Jr. was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and later moved with his family to Fort Montgomery in upstate New York. It was while living there near Bear Mountain that Mr. Franzone began his lifelong passion for the outdoors as he roamed the fields and woods fishing and hunting.
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NEWS
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2005
Sammy Mah, an automotive industry executive, took the helm at World Relief yesterday, bringing a business perspective to the leadership of the Christian relief and development organization. "The mission is the same," Mah said after he was formally installed at a morning ceremony in the group's downtown Baltimore office. "My part is to use my skills to figure out how to do it faster, more efficiently, more effectively." After an eight-month search, the board that oversees World Relief, the humanitarian arm of the National Association of Evangelicals, chose Mah to replace former president Clive Calver, a preacher who left last fall to lead a Connecticut church.
NEWS
March 9, 2010
Dawn Green's story of the demise of her family small business is heartbreaking, but her conclusion that Maryland's tax structure is at fault is puzzling ("Md. loses another small business," March 9). Don't all automotive businesses in Maryland pay the same taxes? Is the playing field not level? Did Maryland taxes cause the global recession or the meltdown of the automotive industry? Did Maryland taxes make cars more reliable, or so complicated that many people choose to use dealerships for specialized services?
BUSINESS
March 10, 1996
BBB list: The Better Business Bureau of Metropolitan New York has listed 1995's most complained about industries. The mail order business was No. 1, with more than 4,000 complaints, nearly double that received by No. 2, the automotive industry. No. 3 was household and office furnishings dealers followed by home improvement firms and consumer electronics companies.Resume pitfalls: You may have had a stellar career, but if your resume is full of mistakes, it may end up in a prospective employer's wastebasket.
NEWS
March 9, 2010
Dawn Green's story of the demise of her family small business is heartbreaking, but her conclusion that Maryland's tax structure is at fault is puzzling ("Md. loses another small business," March 9). Don't all automotive businesses in Maryland pay the same taxes? Is the playing field not level? Did Maryland taxes cause the global recession or the meltdown of the automotive industry? Did Maryland taxes make cars more reliable, or so complicated that many people choose to use dealerships for specialized services?
BUSINESS
By DETROIT FREE PRESS | July 1, 2006
DETROIT -- In a startling move that could reshape General Motors Corp. and the global automotive industry, GM's largest single shareholder has urged France's Renault SA and Japan's Nissan Motor Co. Ltd. to buy a significant minority stake in the automaker to form a three-way global alliance. Nissan and Renault are each considering buying a 10 percent stake in GM, which, combined with the 9.9 percent owned by billionaire investor Kirk Kerkorian, could exert heavy pressure on GM's board and Chief Executive Officer G. Richard Wagoner Jr. to make substantial cost cuts, according to a person familiar with the situation.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | August 26, 1993
WOLFSBURG, Germany -- Filled with confidence despite the charges of industrial espionage swirling around him, Jose Ignacio Lopez de Arriortua, the embattled chief of purchasing and production at Volkswagen AG, says his real enemy is not General Motors Corp., his former employer, but Japan."Unfortunately, they are different," Mr. Lopez said of the Japanese. "I don't like their way of living."If American and European automobile manufacturers lose their competition with the Japanese, he said, "then sooner or later you will have the same style of living as your bosses."
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 14, 2003
In an effort to reach out to potential workers in the automotive industry, Harford County car and truck dealers have established a partnership with Harford Technical High School in Bel Air. The national program, begun locally this school year, is known as Automotive Youth Educational Systems (AYES). The school-to-career initiative helps prepare students for careers in automotive service. "We need young blood in our industry," said Richard Glenn, the manager for AYES in Maryland. "Through this program, they are now working together to make sure what the school produces can be used by the service industry."
NEWS
May 11, 2007
Have no fear for the resilience of the automotive industry. It has confronted the ominously obvious and said: Poppycock. Gas prices are soaring again toward the high discomfort zone. Detroit's reliance on energy hogs hurt sales enough to drop longtime global leader General Motors to second place behind more fuel-efficient Toyota. Wasting fossil fuel is now viewed as a threat to national security as well as environmental health. And the technology to substantially ease the problem lies moldering on the shelf.
NEWS
November 18, 2007
Lest there be any doubt about the importance of federal courts, consider the role courts are now playing in prodding the federal government toward a more practical approach to energy and the environment. The most recent example came last week with a federal appeals court ruling adopting the view of Maryland, California and other states that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases should be considered by the federal government when regulating vehicle fuel-efficiency standards. But that was only the last in a series of decisions that have injected a healthy dose of common sense into a debate that has been wildly politicized.
NEWS
May 11, 2007
Have no fear for the resilience of the automotive industry. It has confronted the ominously obvious and said: Poppycock. Gas prices are soaring again toward the high discomfort zone. Detroit's reliance on energy hogs hurt sales enough to drop longtime global leader General Motors to second place behind more fuel-efficient Toyota. Wasting fossil fuel is now viewed as a threat to national security as well as environmental health. And the technology to substantially ease the problem lies moldering on the shelf.
BUSINESS
By DETROIT FREE PRESS | July 1, 2006
DETROIT -- In a startling move that could reshape General Motors Corp. and the global automotive industry, GM's largest single shareholder has urged France's Renault SA and Japan's Nissan Motor Co. Ltd. to buy a significant minority stake in the automaker to form a three-way global alliance. Nissan and Renault are each considering buying a 10 percent stake in GM, which, combined with the 9.9 percent owned by billionaire investor Kirk Kerkorian, could exert heavy pressure on GM's board and Chief Executive Officer G. Richard Wagoner Jr. to make substantial cost cuts, according to a person familiar with the situation.
NEWS
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2005
Sammy Mah, an automotive industry executive, took the helm at World Relief yesterday, bringing a business perspective to the leadership of the Christian relief and development organization. "The mission is the same," Mah said after he was formally installed at a morning ceremony in the group's downtown Baltimore office. "My part is to use my skills to figure out how to do it faster, more efficiently, more effectively." After an eight-month search, the board that oversees World Relief, the humanitarian arm of the National Association of Evangelicals, chose Mah to replace former president Clive Calver, a preacher who left last fall to lead a Connecticut church.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY | January 18, 2004
I recently acquired shares of Ford Motor Co. What is the outlook? - A.M., via the Internet While the world's No. 2 carmaker kept on truckin' with booming sales throughout the 1990s, the new century wasn't so kind. Growing competition in the light-truck market and fierce sales-incentive wars ravaged its balance sheet. Lately, however, it has been able to significantly cut its costs and also obtain more advantageous labor contracts. Those actions helped boost the shares of Ford 64 percent in value in the past 12 months.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 14, 2003
In an effort to reach out to potential workers in the automotive industry, Harford County car and truck dealers have established a partnership with Harford Technical High School in Bel Air. The national program, begun locally this school year, is known as Automotive Youth Educational Systems (AYES). The school-to-career initiative helps prepare students for careers in automotive service. "We need young blood in our industry," said Richard Glenn, the manager for AYES in Maryland. "Through this program, they are now working together to make sure what the school produces can be used by the service industry."
NEWS
November 18, 2007
Lest there be any doubt about the importance of federal courts, consider the role courts are now playing in prodding the federal government toward a more practical approach to energy and the environment. The most recent example came last week with a federal appeals court ruling adopting the view of Maryland, California and other states that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases should be considered by the federal government when regulating vehicle fuel-efficiency standards. But that was only the last in a series of decisions that have injected a healthy dose of common sense into a debate that has been wildly politicized.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY | January 18, 2004
I recently acquired shares of Ford Motor Co. What is the outlook? - A.M., via the Internet While the world's No. 2 carmaker kept on truckin' with booming sales throughout the 1990s, the new century wasn't so kind. Growing competition in the light-truck market and fierce sales-incentive wars ravaged its balance sheet. Lately, however, it has been able to significantly cut its costs and also obtain more advantageous labor contracts. Those actions helped boost the shares of Ford 64 percent in value in the past 12 months.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 15, 1999
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp. reported a third-quarter profit of $877 million, or $1.33 a share yesterday, rebounding from a loss when strikes hobbled the world's largest automaker in the year-earlier period.GM's results were aided by sales of high-profit trucks such as the Silverado and Sierra pickups in the United States. GM concluded United Auto Workers contract talks last month without any strikes -- a marked change from the 1998 quarter, when two Michigan walkouts left GM with a loss from continuing operations of $309 million, or 52 cents a share.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 23, 1999
TOKYO -- The co-chairman of DaimlerChrysler signaled yesterday that his company intends to aggressively boost its sales revenue in Asia, and would prefer to acquire factories in Japan instead of building them. Those broad hints aside, Juergen E. Schrempp would confirm only that talks continue between his company and beleaguered Nissan Motor Co., Japan's second-largest automaker, over the terms of a possible alliance or asset sale. "Within 10 years, our goal is that 20 to 25 percent of total revenues will come from Asia," Schrempp told reporters here.
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