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NEWS
February 6, 2000
An Anne Arundel County grand jury indicted a Pasadena woman Friday on charges of automobile manslaughter in the death of a pedestrian Aug. 8. Diana M. Schirmacher, 21, of the 8000 block of Outing Ave. is accused in a 10-count indictment of drunken driving and striking James E. Poist, 29, of the 4700 block of Curtis Ave. in Baltimore as he and a friend walked along Route 648 in Pasadena. Originally facing only traffic charges, she was released from jail on a $6,000 bail, prosecutors said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 7, 2014
So, first question: If you could travel to the nation's capital from Baltimore in 15 minutes by super-fast train, would you? Sure you would. You'd give it a try at least once, if only to brag that you had achieved land speed of 300 mph. It would be a bucket list kind of thing. But would you go to the District of Columbia more often if you could get there in 15 minutes? I mean, really: Would having a high-speed train between Baltimore and Washington make you more interested in things D.C. - the Hirshhorn, the Nationals, protests in Lafayette Square, decriminalized pot?
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2011
Arthur Dwight Hooper, a retired telephone technician and vintage automobile enthusiast, died June 7 of bladder cancer at his Centreville home. The former Hamilton and Arnold resident was 70. The son of a Railway Express Co. worker and a homemaker, Mr. Hooper was born in Baltimore and raised in Edmondson Village. After graduating from Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, he served in the Coast Guard, where he was a firefighter. Mr. Hooper began his telephone company career in 1960 when he took a job in the mailroom of the old Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. He rose through the ranks until he became a systems technician.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Harold "Boh" McCaskill, a retired automobile assembly line worker and sports fan, died Sunday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 63. Mr. McCaskill was born in Baltimore and raised on Edmondson Avenue. After graduating in 1968 from the old Carrollton Vocational School in West Baltimore, he began his 32-year career as an automobile assembly line worker at the old General Motors plant on Broening Highway. He retired in 2000. After retiring, he drove part time for seven years for Friends Medical Lab until his health began to decline.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Harold "Boh" McCaskill, a retired automobile assembly line worker and sports fan, died Sunday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 63. Mr. McCaskill was born in Baltimore and raised on Edmondson Avenue. After graduating in 1968 from the old Carrollton Vocational School in West Baltimore, he began his 32-year career as an automobile assembly line worker at the old General Motors plant on Broening Highway. He retired in 2000. After retiring, he drove part time for seven years for Friends Medical Lab until his health began to decline.
BUSINESS
By Rachel Sams and Rachel Sams,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 29, 1999
Marylanders are buying more new cars than they were this time last year.According to figures released by the state Motor Vehicle Administration, new-car sales for May were up 1.2 percent from May 1998.Raymond C. Nichols, chairman of BSCAmerica Inc., a Baltimore-based company that operates six automobile auctions throughout the country, says he has observed an increase in new-car sales in his interactions with new-car dealerships throughout the region."I think, based on our discussions with hundreds of new-car dealerships in the region, the trend has been up for May and June," Nichols said.
NEWS
February 9, 1994
FIRE Manchester: Manchester responded to an automobile fire on Route 27 at 6:17 a.m. yesterday. Units were out for 19 minutes.
FEATURES
January 18, 2006
Jan. 18 1913: The first sedan-type automobile, a Hudson, went on display at the 13th Automobile Show in New York. 1964: U.S. Surgeon General Luther Terry issued the first government report saying smoking may be hazardous to one's health.
NEWS
By LINDA L.S. SCHULTE | May 10, 1991
Recently, my heater core broke. For those uneducated among youwho never knew you had one, the heater core, it seems, is that item located behind your entire automobile --board that makes the defroster work. I discovered this not because I'm a genius at mechanical diagnosis, but because I couldn't see out my front windshield two minutes after I started to drive the car.As an alternative to driving with one hand constantly windexing my front windshield and the other on the wheel, I took the car into the shop and was informed that while the part itself costs a reasonable amount, the labor charges were real attention-getters.
NEWS
By Richard Truett and Richard Truett,Orlando Sentinel | August 30, 1992
HIGHWAYS TO HEAVEN: THE AUTO BIOGRAPHY OF AMERICA.Christopher Finch.HarperCollins.399 pages. $25.Can you think of any other mass-produced product of the Industrial Age that has influenced more aspects of our daily lives than the automobile?Think about it: Cars have altered the way we eat, make love, commit crimes, work, live, shop and vacation, to name just a few activities. A book exploring these changes has the potential to help those born after World War II understand how the infrastructure of our country has evolved.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Two companies announced plans Monday to relocate to Baltimore from the suburbs, bringing more than 300 jobs to downtown and Locust Point. The Maryland Automobile Insurance Fund will move its headquarters from Annapolis to the expanding McHenry Row mixed-use project in Locust Point by fall 2015, bringing its 240-person workforce. And Kao USA Inc., a unit of a Japanese beauty products company, will move from Hanover to offices at One Charles Center, with 70 workers. MAIF, a state-created entity that insures drivers who can't get private-market coverage, will lease two floors to be built atop the Phillips Seafood headquarters building on Fort Avenue.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
The U.S. Department of Justice has identified and begun targeting a broad conspiracy to fix prices on automobile shipments in and out of Baltimore and other U.S. ports, with a Chilean company recently pleading guilty to violating federal antitrust laws in the scheme. Justice officials reached a felony plea agreement with Valparaiso, Chile-based Compania Sud Americana de Vapores (CSAV), according to documents filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. They called it the first charge to land in a continuing antitrust investigation into companies colluding to push up shipping prices.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Richard A. Hartman, former president and CEO of the Automobile Club of Maryland who fought at the Battle of the Bulge, died Feb. 28 of complications from cancer and renal failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The former longtime Cedarcroft resident was 91. "Dick was the most ethical person I have ever known. He did everything that was right, and he demanded that out of the people who worked with him. He was truly a wonderful person," said William U. "Bill" Bass, who succeeded Mr. Hartman as president of the Automobile Club of Maryland when he retired in 1987.
EXPLORE
September 3, 2013
The National Automobile Dealers Charitable Foundation will make a donation of CPR training aids to the Level Volunteer Fire Company on Thursday, Sept. 5 at 10 a.m. at the fire station at 3633 Level Village Road in Havre de Grace. Charlie Walls of Plaza Ford in Bel Air will be on hand to present the members of Level VFC with several CPR mannequins, which will be used to teach pre-hospital care providers and citizens high performance CPR. Quality Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation improves survival from cardiac arrest.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Jarnetta Kroh, a Greater Baltimore Medical Center philanthropist who assisted her husband in his import car servicing business, died Nov. 25 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder at her home in Laguna Hills, Calif. She was 81 and had lived in the Rockland section of Baltimore County for many years. Jarnetta Althea Jarvis was born in Spencer, W.Va., and raised in Walton, W.Va., where her father was postmaster. Her mother was a secretary to a May Co. department store executive.
EXPLORE
By Louise Vest | October 5, 2011
100 Years Ago More horse power "Horses, Mares, Mules; Sold for Want of Use" was the headline of an ad in the Times : " 10 Mares, 15 Horses, 2 Mares in foal, 5 Top Wagons, 2 Trucks, lot of harnesses will be sold regardless of cost. 20 Days guarantee with each animal. Used by Chesapeake Oyster & Fish. Co., during the past season. apply at Stables 205 S. Paca St. Baltimore, Md. " Guess the auto was taking the animals' jobs and they were hoping to sell in rural Howard County, where original horse power was still in use. 75 Years Ago Rale against traffic More parking in downtown Ellicott City was the focus of an article in the Times that week: "Two Frame Buildings At Depot Yard To Be Razed In Near Future; Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Gives Thirty Days To Tenants - Parking Problem Of Town Will Be Aided By Improvement The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad has given notice to the two one-story frame buildings on Main Street at the Depot Yard in Ellicott City to vacate the premises within thirty days.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2006
Everyone is familiar with the signs that shout out the cost of driving these days, the ones that say $2.97, $3.08, $3.16, $3.27, that chronicle the rising price of a gallon of gasoline. Those signs get the public fuming, the politicians posturing and the president investigating. But there are many other signs of the cost of America's love affair with the automobile that seem to fade into the background like drab wallpaper. Take those small memorials - the crosses, the plastic flowers, the teddy bears - that mark the site of a death by automobile.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2011
Arthur Dwight Hooper, a retired telephone technician and vintage automobile enthusiast, died June 7 of bladder cancer at his Centreville home. The former Hamilton and Arnold resident was 70. The son of a Railway Express Co. worker and a homemaker, Mr. Hooper was born in Baltimore and raised in Edmondson Village. After graduating from Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, he served in the Coast Guard, where he was a firefighter. Mr. Hooper began his telephone company career in 1960 when he took a job in the mailroom of the old Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. He rose through the ranks until he became a systems technician.
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