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Autoimmune Diseases

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By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2004
MedImmune Inc. announced yesterday a drug-development partnership with Princeton, N.J.-based Medarex Inc., a deal aimed at giving the Gaithersburg company a foothold in developing treatments for autoimmune diseases such as lupus. MedImmune, one of the few Maryland biotechnology companies with substantial product sales, will be the financier and will take the lead in bringing drug candidates to market. The company derives the bulk of its sales from one product, its Synagis treatment for respiratory infection in infants, and it is trying to reposition its money-losing FluMist.
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By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2010
For 10-year-old Jacob Krause, getting ready for the new school year wasn't a simple matter of back-to-school shopping. It also involved working out logistics for getting to the bathroom as many as 20 times during a single school day. The Clarksville Elementary School fifth-grader has severe ulcerative colitis, an inflammatory bowel disease that increasingly, and somewhat mysteriously, strikes children. The number of children afflicted by colitis and another inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, has increased 50 percent in the past decade, according to the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America.
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By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | June 5, 2008
For 10 years, Donna Jackson Nakazawa has suffered from a range of autoimmune diseases - ailments in which our cellular defense system mistakes friend for foe and attacks the body's tissues. Among the diseases caused by autoimmunity are: rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, lupus, Type 1 diabetes, thyroiditis and many others. A journalist and author who has published several books, Nakazawa became fascinated with autoimmunity and spent the past three years exploring the topic. The result is her latest book, published this spring: The Autoimmune Epidemic: Bodies Gone Haywire in a World out of Balance and the Cutting-Edge Science that Promises Hope.
FEATURES
By Euna Lhee and Euna Lhee,Sun reporter | July 31, 2008
Maryland researchers have identified a key receptor in the intestine that can trigger celiac disease, and they hope their findings can be applied to other autoimmune disorders, such as Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Celiac disease is a digestive disorder that damages the small intestine and interferes with the absorption of nutrients from food. People with the condition cannot process a protein called gluten - most commonly found in grains such as wheat, rye and barley, but also found in medicines and vitamins.
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | June 4, 1991
When Camille Marx was diagnosed with lupus four years ago, she had never heard of it. And she didn't have the faintest idea what an autoimmune disorder was.Now that autoimmune disorders have hit the White House, though, the condition is being discussed everywhere from scientific laboratories to radio talk shows.Lupus -- which First Dog Millie suffers from -- is an autoimmune disorder, as is Grave's disease, which has been diagnosed in both President and Barbara Bush. Both conditions are the result of the body's immune system mistaking a part of the body for a foreign invader and attacking it.For Ms. Marx, the current public interest is one more step in helping her deal with lupus, a disease that affects 1 of every 2,000 Americans, causing such symptoms as skin rashes, joint pain and swelling, sensitivity to sunlight and anemia.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 17, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- After many years of suffering with an autoimmune disease called lupus, Virginia Ladd realized that no one was focusing attention on things she had learned the hard way:* That autoimmune disorders -- in which the immune system attacks the body's own tissue -- often run in families.* That they mostly strike women.* That they are as widespread and life-threatening as cancer and heart disease, yet many sufferers are initially dismissed as whiners and hypochondriacs."Unfortunately, physicians rarely take a family history of autoimmune diseases," said Ms. Ladd, 54. "I had an aunt who died with lupus at age 45. She was diagnosed through an autopsy.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1996
Jacque Redmond suffers from an abnormal blood clotting condition. She and her mother had miscarriages. Three of her cousins have insulin-dependent diabetes, and another cousin has a heart defect. But until this week, the Columbia woman didn't realize her family members' symptoms were anything but random.Like one in five Americans, Mrs. Redmond and her relatives have immune systems gone awry, a bodily response that researchers have begun to identify as the underlying cause of more than 80 diseases.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 16, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Silicone gel breast implants, one of the most popular cosmetic surgeries in the United States, will be available only to a limited number of women who will test their safety, FDA Commissioner David Kessler is to announce today.Breast cancer patients and those disfigured by birth defects or injuries will have the best chance to obtain the implants if their doctor is convinced it is necessary for their well-being, a Food and Drug Administration official familiar with the plan said.
NEWS
By RONALD KOTULAK and RONALD KOTULAK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 21, 2006
Treatment with antibodies naturally produced in the body appears to halt the memory-robbing progression of Alzheimer's disease, according to promising early research that scientists plan to expand over the next year. Current Alzheimer's drugs provide moderate relief to some patients but do not stop the disease from advancing. By contrast, the antibodies - a treatment already in use for multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases - stopped or slightly reversed the disease in six of eight patients participating in an 18-month preliminary clinical trial.
FEATURES
By Mary Beckman | October 4, 2007
Oprah Winfrey recently informed the nation on Good Morning America that she "blew out her thyroid" at the end of last season because of stress. But that isn't exactly a medical term. No one blows out a thyroid, says endocrinologist Dr. Terry Smith of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. "What is that? Like a right rear tire on a Ferrari?" he asks. Winfrey then wrote about her medical condition in the October issue of her magazine, O, elaborating that she had both kinds of thyroid disease -- an overactive thyroid and then an underactive one, both considered autoimmune diseases.
FEATURES
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | June 5, 2008
For 10 years, Donna Jackson Nakazawa has suffered from a range of autoimmune diseases - ailments in which our cellular defense system mistakes friend for foe and attacks the body's tissues. Among the diseases caused by autoimmunity are: rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, lupus, Type 1 diabetes, thyroiditis and many others. A journalist and author who has published several books, Nakazawa became fascinated with autoimmunity and spent the past three years exploring the topic. The result is her latest book, published this spring: The Autoimmune Epidemic: Bodies Gone Haywire in a World out of Balance and the Cutting-Edge Science that Promises Hope.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | December 6, 2007
Not so long ago, celiac disease was considered to be an allergy to gluten, a protein found in wheat and other grains, that predominantly affected children. Now, however, it is known that celiac disease is an autoimmune disease that affects about 1 percent of people in the United States, says Dr. Alessio Fasano, director of the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. What is celiac disease? Nowadays, celiac disease is perceived to be an autoimmune disease like diabetes and multiple sclerosis, not a food allergy to wheat as thought before.
FEATURES
By Mary Beckman | October 4, 2007
Oprah Winfrey recently informed the nation on Good Morning America that she "blew out her thyroid" at the end of last season because of stress. But that isn't exactly a medical term. No one blows out a thyroid, says endocrinologist Dr. Terry Smith of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. "What is that? Like a right rear tire on a Ferrari?" he asks. Winfrey then wrote about her medical condition in the October issue of her magazine, O, elaborating that she had both kinds of thyroid disease -- an overactive thyroid and then an underactive one, both considered autoimmune diseases.
NEWS
By RONALD KOTULAK and RONALD KOTULAK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 21, 2006
Treatment with antibodies naturally produced in the body appears to halt the memory-robbing progression of Alzheimer's disease, according to promising early research that scientists plan to expand over the next year. Current Alzheimer's drugs provide moderate relief to some patients but do not stop the disease from advancing. By contrast, the antibodies - a treatment already in use for multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases - stopped or slightly reversed the disease in six of eight patients participating in an 18-month preliminary clinical trial.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2005
MedImmune Inc. announced plans yesterday to acquire another Gaithersburg biotech company, Cellective Therapeutics Inc. - a startup drawing attention from investors because of its research into treatments for cancers and various autoimmune diseases. Terms of the cash deal, expected to close next month, were not revealed, though MedImmune said the transaction would cause 2005 earnings per share to drop 20 cents - to between 4 cents and 10 cents - because of a "one-time in-process research and development charge."
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2004
MedImmune Inc. announced yesterday a drug-development partnership with Princeton, N.J.-based Medarex Inc., a deal aimed at giving the Gaithersburg company a foothold in developing treatments for autoimmune diseases such as lupus. MedImmune, one of the few Maryland biotechnology companies with substantial product sales, will be the financier and will take the lead in bringing drug candidates to market. The company derives the bulk of its sales from one product, its Synagis treatment for respiratory infection in infants, and it is trying to reposition its money-losing FluMist.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2005
MedImmune Inc. announced plans yesterday to acquire another Gaithersburg biotech company, Cellective Therapeutics Inc. - a startup drawing attention from investors because of its research into treatments for cancers and various autoimmune diseases. Terms of the cash deal, expected to close next month, were not revealed, though MedImmune said the transaction would cause 2005 earnings per share to drop 20 cents - to between 4 cents and 10 cents - because of a "one-time in-process research and development charge."
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | December 6, 2007
Not so long ago, celiac disease was considered to be an allergy to gluten, a protein found in wheat and other grains, that predominantly affected children. Now, however, it is known that celiac disease is an autoimmune disease that affects about 1 percent of people in the United States, says Dr. Alessio Fasano, director of the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. What is celiac disease? Nowadays, celiac disease is perceived to be an autoimmune disease like diabetes and multiple sclerosis, not a food allergy to wheat as thought before.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1996
Jacque Redmond suffers from an abnormal blood clotting condition. She and her mother had miscarriages. Three of her cousins have insulin-dependent diabetes, and another cousin has a heart defect. But until this week, the Columbia woman didn't realize her family members' symptoms were anything but random.Like one in five Americans, Mrs. Redmond and her relatives have immune systems gone awry, a bodily response that researchers have begun to identify as the underlying cause of more than 80 diseases.
NEWS
By Rena Selya | December 12, 1995
NEW YORK -- Millions of American women rely on the health information that appears each month in the women's magazines. I recently reviewed 24 articles in 13 of these magazines published between 1989 and 1995, looking for information about the safety of silicone breast implants. What I found was a frightening array of inaccuracies and disinformation.Most of the articles on silicone breast implants claimed that they are dangerous and cause a variety of health problems.A 1989 Vogue article cataloged the alleged effects of silicone implants on the immune system and connective tissue.
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