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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Eduardo A. Encina | January 11, 2012
Because of lingering symptoms of a concussion suffered 16 months ago, Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts most likely will be skipping next weekend's FanFest at the Baltimore Convention Center. A club source said it was “highly doubtful” Roberts, who played in just 39 games in 2011 because of the concussion, would be at the Jan. 21 event but it “is not completely out of the realm of possibility.” Roberts was originally slated to be there, and vouchers for one of his two joint autograph sessions had sold out. But he recently informed the club that, because he has been advised by doctors the event could cause further stress, he would not be attending.
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NEWS
December 4, 1998
Mary A. Benjamin, 93, one of the country's foremost collectors and dealers of autographs, died Monday in Hunter, N.Y. A cause of death was not given.Nicknamed "The Autograph Lady-USA," she was owner of the country's oldest autograph and manuscript dealership, Walter R. Benjamin Autographs.Anthony Salvatore, 77, a Grammy Award-winning music recording engineer, died Nov. 18 in Hackensack, N.J. He won Grammys for recordings of "Lohengrin" in 1966, "Sweeney Todd" in 1979 and "The Heifetz Collection" in 1995.
NEWS
December 23, 2005
On the day when the really big news in major-league baseball was the Yankees' signing of Johnny Damon - just the latest big-name player to jump for big bucks from one big-payroll team to another - the game lost a man who proudly put in 37 seasons with the same club. Elrod Hendricks, who died Wednesday just a day shy of 65, was a true rarity, and not just because, in his playing days, he was a left-handed-hitting catcher who knew how to handle pitchers. He was an old-school gentleman who, as the Orioles' bullpen coach since 1977, set a standard for loyalty unlikely to be matched in the game today.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker | July 29, 2007
Crowds gathered throughout Cooperstown yesterday, but nowhere were the bodies packed tighter than around booths where baseball greats signed memorabilia. The hunt for Ripken autographs became so intense that when the inductee's golf cart neared a fence bordering a public road yesterday, dozens of people appeared within seconds asking for some Sharpie love. One enterprising homeowner charged $10 a head for anyone who wanted to stand in his yard near the edge of the golf course. Dozens paid the fee happily, perhaps realizing that they would pay five times as much at one of the autograph booths in town.
NEWS
February 2, 2012
On a trip to Dallas from BWI last week, to my surprise, I was sitting next to Ray Lewis of the Ravens. He was on his way to the Pro Bowl in Hawaii, and I'm sure it was a bittersweet trip for him. Mr. Lewis accommodated anyone and everyone who asked for an autograph with respect and dignity. He was most kind and considerate, even while being interrupted during a telephone call for an autograph while we were sitting at the gate. I did take the liberty of congratulating him on a great season, and he shook my hand with appreciation.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2003
All week long, young and old, they've come to Middle River to pay homage to Vinnie Barbarino of television's Sweathogs fame. Or Danny Zuko from the movie Grease. But mostly it was, in the collective mind's eye of the fans who lined up daily by the hundreds on Old Eastern Avenue, the swaggering dancing machine Tony Manero in Saturday Night Fever. John Travolta is at the creaky but venerable Commodore bar and meeting hall this week filming Ladder 49, a tale of Baltimore firefighters, their triumphs and their foibles.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | July 21, 1993
CARLISLE, Pa. -- Brian Mitchell was mobbed by autograph seekers yesterday as he left the Washington Redskins weightlifting tent after a morning workout.Instead of trying to dodge them, Mitchell signed every notebook, picture and even the back of one kid's shirt until all the fans got their autographs and the crowd melted away.Mitchell, who'll be 25 on Aug. 18, is obviously enjoying his time in the spotlight."I have a motto that if you never get asked for your autograph, you're not doing something good.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | August 15, 2009
Given the choice of attending a bachelor's party or meeting his Orioles hero, Bryan Erdman didn't blink. "I bailed on the party," Erdman, 28, of Parkville said. Instead, he stood in line Friday night at Camden Yards with several hundred fans to get autographs of four players from the 1989 Orioles, the "Why Not" club that nearly won a pennant. For an hour before the Orioles game, fans hobnobbed with outfielder Mike Devereaux, catcher Mickey Tettleton and pitchers Dave Schmidt and Dave Johnson, reminisced about that glorious summer and gathered autographs.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | June 25, 1995
When a famous entertainer shows up in Baltimore, chances are Owen Sweeney isn't far behind.Mr. Sweeney, a resident of Bel Air who attends the University of Baltimore, collects autographs. Not by trading with other collectors or buying from dealers, but by getting them himself.When someone famous breezes into town, he's one of a half-dozen or so young men who can pretty much be counted on to show up with pen in hand."Not to brag, but I think I'm like the main person in Baltimore," he says, bragging anyway.
SPORTS
December 1, 1991
Unfriendly experienceThe article by Doug Brown in last Sunday's Sun regarding Eddie Murray prompted me to write. I left the baseball card show with a completely opposite view of Eddie and his friendliness toward the Baltimore fans.I stood with a camera in front of Eddie and Cal for a while trying to get a picture. I watched Cal smile and speak to everyone. (Cal was terrific, even though I did not get an autograph). I never saw Eddie even crack a smile. He looked right into my camera twice with a blank stare.
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