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March 5, 1995
I recently finished "The Invisible Man," by Ralph Waldo Ellison and I'm now reading "The Autobiography of Malcolm X" byMalcolm X and Alex Haley. Both are really interesting, both have received critical acclaim and I never read them in college. Also, issues Ellison wrote about 40 years ago are still issues faced by blacks today.Captain Mark E. Garrett,Baltimore County Fire Department
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NEWS
By ART WINSLOW and ART WINSLOW,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 12, 2006
Strivers Row Kevin Baker HarperCollins / 550 pages / $26 "I believe in the brotherhood of man, all men," Malcolm X declared in a speech two months before he was assassinated in February 1965, "but I don't believe in brotherhood with anybody who doesn't want brotherhood with me." It was a more evenhanded sentiment than many he had been known to express, but then Malcolm X's political path had changed markedly in the last year of his life: He had broken with Elijah Muhammad and the Nation of Islam, and made a religious pilgrimage, or hajj, to Mecca.
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FEATURES
By Sandy Crockett and Sandy Crockett,Staff Writer | November 16, 1992
Cecelia Barnhardt recently finished her second reading of "The Autobiography of Malcolm X," and it won't be her last."I will read it over and over again. It is just so uplifting and motivating," she says of the book, which was published in 1965 and co-written with the late Alex Haley. And, after reading the book, the 20-year-old cosmetology student is looking forward to the opening of Spike Lee's $35 million movie. "When the movie comes out," she says, "I will be the first one there."Victoria Henderson, 17, had not been required by her Prince George's County school to read the autobiography, but she read it anyway.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 7, 2002
THAT BOOK is in the news again. You know what book: the one that's caused all that ruckus from the first day it was published. It's been 37 years since The Autobiography of Malcolm X was published. More than 3 million copies of the book have been sold. Modern Library lists the book on its top 100 nonfiction works. Time magazine ranked it among the top 10 nonfiction books of the 20th century. The autobiography has inspired, no doubt, thousands of readers at the very least. But what's this we hear about criticism of the book because reading it supposedly led one John Walker Lindh to convert to Islam and become an American Taliban?
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 7, 2002
THAT BOOK is in the news again. You know what book: the one that's caused all that ruckus from the first day it was published. It's been 37 years since The Autobiography of Malcolm X was published. More than 3 million copies of the book have been sold. Modern Library lists the book on its top 100 nonfiction works. Time magazine ranked it among the top 10 nonfiction books of the 20th century. The autobiography has inspired, no doubt, thousands of readers at the very least. But what's this we hear about criticism of the book because reading it supposedly led one John Walker Lindh to convert to Islam and become an American Taliban?
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | November 16, 1992
From the beginning, in the mid-1960s, Alex Haley was told his idea would never work. His agent insisted no publisher would print a book about a feared, even hated black leader. And the proposed subject of the book agreed.Even when Haley won over his agent and found a publisher, events threatened to keep "The Autobiography of Malcolm X" from ever seeing print. When gunmen in Harlem's Audubon Ballroom ended the life of Malcolm X on Feb. 21, 1965, publisher Nelson Doubleday announced that out of fear of harm to his staff and to his bookstore in New York, Doubleday would not publish the book -- even though it had been set in type, ready to be !
NEWS
December 7, 1992
Spike Lee's movie adaptation of Alex Haley's "Autobiography of Malcolm X" has prompted much criticism of the crass commercialization of the activist's name and image, in products ranging from Malcolm X T-shirts, caps and coffee mugs to a brand of potato chips bearing his likeness.Perhaps this transformation is only to be expected from an industry notorious for turning almost anything into a profitable commodity. But fortunately, the movie has also stirred more serious reassessment of Malcolm's place in history, especially among blacks.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 31, 1992
This story's about the passage of time and the people we lose along the way. It's about Malcolm X and John Kennedy, but mostly it's about how the connection has been broken to places like a classroom in East Baltimore.Go back a couple of weeks with Deborah Taylor, who heads the Office of Children and Youth for the Enoch Pratt Free Library. She brought Walter Myers to Canton Middle School, to talk to the kids there about the writing of books.Myers is finishing a biography of Malcolm X, the fiery black leader who helped revolutionize the way African Americans think of themselves before he was shot and killed 27 years ago. Myers' book would tie in with the release later this year of Spike Lee's highly publicized and heavily marketed movie about Malcolm.
NEWS
By ABDUL RAHMAN ABDI and ABDUL RAHMAN ABDI,Abdul Rahman Abdi is a senior economics major at the University of Maryland | February 15, 1992
College Park--During the late '70s, as a little black boy living in East Africa, I heard the story of a black American man who wrote a book that traced his ancestry back to Africa. I took a vow that I would read it someday when I grew up and learned to read English.Six days before his death in Seattle, Alex Haley, author of ''Roots'' and ''The Autobiography of Malcolm X,'' spoke at the University of Maryland. He told us about how as a young boy in the Old South, he sat next to his aunts and uncles as they exchanged stories about life in general and the story of their family in particular.
NEWS
By R. B. Jones | May 19, 1992
MALCOLM X hats are everywhere. Youths born long after the death of the black nationalist leader in 1965 wear the X hat. Middle-aged men who may not have supported him when he was living wear the hat.Much of this can be attributed to the eager anticipation of Spike Lee's movie on Malcolm, slated for release by the end of the year, as well as the frequent use of segments of Malcolm's speeches by rap groups. But there is a deeper reason why Malcolm X has re-emerged as the symbol of forceful black leadership.
NEWS
March 5, 1995
I recently finished "The Invisible Man," by Ralph Waldo Ellison and I'm now reading "The Autobiography of Malcolm X" byMalcolm X and Alex Haley. Both are really interesting, both have received critical acclaim and I never read them in college. Also, issues Ellison wrote about 40 years ago are still issues faced by blacks today.Captain Mark E. Garrett,Baltimore County Fire Department
FEATURES
By Greg Dawson and Greg Dawson,Orlando Sentinel | January 26, 1994
PBS clears out 2 1/2 hours tonight for the documentary "Malcolm X: Make It Plain" (8 to 10:30, WMPT, Channel 22 and Channel 67) -- a programming decision viewers might greet with a "done that, seen that" sense of deja vu.They should think again, for "Make It Plain" vividly proves that for all his newfound celebrity, we are still in the process of discovering the essential Malcolm X.It's safe to say that a decade ago, eight out of 10 people on the street didn't...
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | December 11, 1992
DURING the summer of 1968, a classmate of mine at Cit College threw a copy of "The Autobiography of Malcolm X" on my desk and urged me to read it. "Be open-minded," he advised, though the suggestion wasn't necessary.I was hooked from the opening paragraph. I have not read before or since a biographical account which reads like classic drama, suspensefully building the rising action to a well-defined climax.Spike Lee's movie has none of that suspense. It gives shallow, almost cursory treatment to the father-son relationship between Malcolm X and Elijah Muhammad, and it misses the opportunity for the superb drama that played out as the differences between the two developed over the years.
NEWS
December 7, 1992
Spike Lee's movie adaptation of Alex Haley's "Autobiography of Malcolm X" has prompted much criticism of the crass commercialization of the activist's name and image, in products ranging from Malcolm X T-shirts, caps and coffee mugs to a brand of potato chips bearing his likeness.Perhaps this transformation is only to be expected from an industry notorious for turning almost anything into a profitable commodity. But fortunately, the movie has also stirred more serious reassessment of Malcolm's place in history, especially among blacks.
FEATURES
By Sandy Crockett and Sandy Crockett,Staff Writer | November 16, 1992
Cecelia Barnhardt recently finished her second reading of "The Autobiography of Malcolm X," and it won't be her last."I will read it over and over again. It is just so uplifting and motivating," she says of the book, which was published in 1965 and co-written with the late Alex Haley. And, after reading the book, the 20-year-old cosmetology student is looking forward to the opening of Spike Lee's $35 million movie. "When the movie comes out," she says, "I will be the first one there."Victoria Henderson, 17, had not been required by her Prince George's County school to read the autobiography, but she read it anyway.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | November 16, 1992
From the beginning, in the mid-1960s, Alex Haley was told his idea would never work. His agent insisted no publisher would print a book about a feared, even hated black leader. And the proposed subject of the book agreed.Even when Haley won over his agent and found a publisher, events threatened to keep "The Autobiography of Malcolm X" from ever seeing print. When gunmen in Harlem's Audubon Ballroom ended the life of Malcolm X on Feb. 21, 1965, publisher Nelson Doubleday announced that out of fear of harm to his staff and to his bookstore in New York, Doubleday would not publish the book -- even though it had been set in type, ready to be !
NEWS
By ART WINSLOW and ART WINSLOW,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 12, 2006
Strivers Row Kevin Baker HarperCollins / 550 pages / $26 "I believe in the brotherhood of man, all men," Malcolm X declared in a speech two months before he was assassinated in February 1965, "but I don't believe in brotherhood with anybody who doesn't want brotherhood with me." It was a more evenhanded sentiment than many he had been known to express, but then Malcolm X's political path had changed markedly in the last year of his life: He had broken with Elijah Muhammad and the Nation of Islam, and made a religious pilgrimage, or hajj, to Mecca.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | October 10, 1992
Malcolm X made the cover of The New Yorker this week, and I was reminded of my first encounter with the strange movement with which he was for many years closely identified.It was in 1966, when the fledgling Black Students Organization at our predominantly white New England university invited Louis Farrakhan to address one of the group's regular Saturdaymeetings.Mr. Farrakhan, who had become Elijah Muhammad's spokesmen little over a year earlier, following the assassination of Malcolm in New York, arrived on campus alone, having taken the train in from nearby Boston.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | October 10, 1992
Malcolm X made the cover of The New Yorker this week, and I was reminded of my first encounter with the strange movement with which he was for many years closely identified.It was in 1966, when the fledgling Black Students Organization at our predominantly white New England university invited Louis Farrakhan to address one of the group's regular Saturdaymeetings.Mr. Farrakhan, who had become Elijah Muhammad's spokesmen little over a year earlier, following the assassination of Malcolm in New York, arrived on campus alone, having taken the train in from nearby Boston.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 31, 1992
This story's about the passage of time and the people we lose along the way. It's about Malcolm X and John Kennedy, but mostly it's about how the connection has been broken to places like a classroom in East Baltimore.Go back a couple of weeks with Deborah Taylor, who heads the Office of Children and Youth for the Enoch Pratt Free Library. She brought Walter Myers to Canton Middle School, to talk to the kids there about the writing of books.Myers is finishing a biography of Malcolm X, the fiery black leader who helped revolutionize the way African Americans think of themselves before he was shot and killed 27 years ago. Myers' book would tie in with the release later this year of Spike Lee's highly publicized and heavily marketed movie about Malcolm.
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