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NEWS
February 14, 1992
When you sum up the arguments being offered against Maryland's acceptance of a nine-state agreement to adopt California's new auto-emissions standard, it comes down to: try something else first. That's not surprising, when the opposition comes from automakers, car dealers and the oil industry. What is surprising, considering Maryland's plan, is that the chief complainers have already agreed to do most of what regulators seek.California is a big state. Its air-quality program already has forced automakers to install different anti-pollution technology on cars.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter | December 28, 2006
Pointing to a study showing an elevated risk of pollution-related cancer in Maryland, a group of health and environmental advocates said yesterday that they would push for legislation next year requiring Maryland to join 11 other states that require new vehicles to be equipped with technology designed to reduce airborne emissions. The bill, which will be sponsored by Del. Elizabeth Bobo, a Howard County Democrat, would bring Maryland in line with standards originally adopted in California for limiting releases of three known or suspected cancer-causing chemicals.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Breaking with other oil industry leaders, a senior British Petroleum executive has acknowledged that scientists have reached a consensus about global warming and that to ignore concerns over climate change "would be unwise and potentially dangerous."John Browne, group chief executive of the British oil company, said that in tackling the controversial issue of global warming, about which the oil industry has long expressed skepticism, it is time "for change and for a rethinking of corporate responsibility."
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2000
A citizen group sued the Environmental Protection Agency yesterday, saying it violated the Clean Air Act in February by approving an air-quality plan for Greater Baltimore based on "fudged" data. The case, filed in 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., could set a precedent nationally over how the agency measures vehicle emissions. Emissions levels are significant to transportation planners because new road projects will not qualify for federal money if pollution is too high.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
Under pressure from lawmakers, Gov. William Donald Schaefer has decided to appoint an independent blue-ribbon commission to oversee the awarding of a controversial auto emissions testing contract.The seven-member panel will oversee and advise the Department of Transportation, reviewing proposals and making recommendations on the award of the contract, said Page Boinest, a spokeswoman for Governor Schaefer.The contract, which is expected to be worth $100 million, would upgrade, expand and set higher standards for Maryland's tailpipe monitoring program.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1997
The House of Delegates gave preliminary approval last night to a bill that defies Washington's demand for a mandatory treadmill test of auto emissions in Maryland.The bill, a similar version of which has already passed the state Senate, would allow motorists to choose to have their vehicles tested on the treadmill-like dynamometer -- or not.Final General Assembly approval of the legislation is considered likely, leaving Gov. Parris N. Glendening with a dilemma:Should he accept the will of the Assembly and motorists who object to the testing requirement?
NEWS
March 8, 1991
State officials say Maryland needs tougher motor vehicle pollution standards than federal law requires to eliminate the smog that plagues the Baltimore and Washington areas every summer.Of 330 Evening Sun readers and other callers to SUNDIAL yesterday, 179, or 54 percent, favor tougher standards for auto emissions, and 151, or 45 percent, oppose tougher standards.Of 333 callers, 152, or 45 percent, would be willing to pay more for an auto that meets tougher auto-emissions standards, and 181, or 54 percent, would not be willing to pay more.
NEWS
July 20, 1992
Based on the latest maneuver on enforcing the Clean Air Act, environmentalists must think George Bush is moving two steps forward, one step back. The Environmental Protection Agency has issued new rules requiring more stringent testing of auto emissions -- letting industries off the hook.This plan will bring 55 urban areas into the national auto-emissions test program, at the same time forcing regions with existing programs to upgrade their standards.In Maryland, the state must install new, $100,000 treadmills with computer-controlled diagnostic gear in place of existing emissions test equipment in the Baltimore and suburban Washington regions.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | January 6, 1995
Teamwork is a concept that the District 31 General Assembly delegation doesn't seem to talk about much.With the beginning of the 1995 legislative session less than a week away, the members say they have a number of ideas they hope to work on individually but little they want to do together.They don't even agree on what to do about the one issue that concerns all of them: a more stringent auto emissions testing program that was to begin Jan. 1.Democratic Sen. Phillip C. Jimeno, who believes the program costs motorists too much money and time said he will submit legislation that would stop the new program to allow the General Assembly to study it further and possibly revise it. Meanwhile, he said, the state would continue use the simpler, cheaper system.
NEWS
March 28, 1993
Just two weeks remain in this year's General Assembly session. It has been a quiet meeting, devoid of the bitter conflicts and brutal budget battles of recent years. Yet much remains to be accomplished. Here are five key unfinished items:* Health-care reform. Both House and Senate have approved steps to help small businesses offer health insurance to employees and to establish a commission on health-care costs. But there is dispute on how to bring down medical costs, especially the issue of limiting a physician's charges.
NEWS
By Theodore L. Gaillard Jr | December 19, 1997
AS DUST settles from the contentious global warming conference, the cry goes up from both extremes of the environmental lobby: ''Seven percent? You've got to be kidding!''That the United States has agreed to a 7 percent reduction below 1990 levels for U.S. heat-trapping emissions is seen as insufficient by many wildlife lovers, but as an impossible and economically disruptive goal by some industry groups. Dithering over details will continue, but it's time for immediate action.After the 1992 Rio conference, the United States passed no significant climate legislation and made scant progress toward a commitment to cut emissions.
NEWS
September 30, 1997
STARTING TOMORROW, most vehicle owners in the state must put their automobiles through a controversial treadmill test (the dynamometer) as part of the required two-year emissions inspection program. Previously, the treadmill test had been voluntary. Yet judging from the half-million motorists who have already experienced the dynamometer, it's no big deal.The chief beneficiaries of this change will be all who breathe in the state. The very young, the elderly and the 600,000 Marylanders with respiratory problems are most vulnerable to auto-caused smog.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Breaking with other oil industry leaders, a senior British Petroleum executive has acknowledged that scientists have reached a consensus about global warming and that to ignore concerns over climate change "would be unwise and potentially dangerous."John Browne, group chief executive of the British oil company, said that in tackling the controversial issue of global warming, about which the oil industry has long expressed skepticism, it is time "for change and for a rethinking of corporate responsibility."
NEWS
April 29, 1997
MARYLAND'S General Assembly voted with its heart, not its head, when lawmakers approved a bill this month banning mandatory treadmill tests as part of the state's auto-emissions inspection program. That leaves Gov. Parris N. Glendening little choice -- if he uses his head -- but to overrule that emotional legislative decision and cast his first veto of 1997.If the governor fails to act by May 15, the Environmental Protection Agency says it will impose a federal clean-air program on Maryland that hurts drivers, businesses and the state's highway program.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1997
The House of Delegates gave preliminary approval last night to a bill that defies Washington's demand for a mandatory treadmill test of auto emissions in Maryland.The bill, a similar version of which has already passed the state Senate, would allow motorists to choose to have their vehicles tested on the treadmill-like dynamometer -- or not.Final General Assembly approval of the legislation is considered likely, leaving Gov. Parris N. Glendening with a dilemma:Should he accept the will of the Assembly and motorists who object to the testing requirement?
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1997
For Mary Bontempo, O'Dette McDonald and Sister Katherine Nueslein, clean air is a cause worth fighting for.They hardly seem the combative type. One is a nun, one an employee of a home health care company and one a community outreach worker for a church.Yet the Baltimore women are behind a federal lawsuit that could require owners of all motor vehicles in Maryland to submit them to a controversial treadmill-like device, called a dynamometer. The intention is to improve air quality by reducing auto emissions.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | January 18, 1994
Maryland's plan to adopt California's strict auto emissions standards is unlikely to curb smog in the Baltimore and Washington areas as much or as quickly as predicted, says a study released yesterday by a Johns Hopkins University pollution expert.Dr. Hugh Ellis, a professor of environmental engineering at Hopkins, concludes there may be cheaper and more reliable ways to reduce ozone pollution in the state than with so-called "California cars."Dr. Ellis' study puts a dent in a proposal by Maryland and some other states that low-emission vehicles, including some powered by batteries, be sold from Maine to Virginia beginning in 1997.
NEWS
November 5, 1993
President Clinton's lengthy plan to stem global warming by reducing the consumption of fossil fuels relies heavily on the V word -- voluntary.It's another environmental balancing act by the administration, heavy on the apocalyptic rhetoric but short on strong policy measures. Vice President Al Gore's urgent but fuzzy predictions of environmental dystopia overlay what is really an appeal to the volunteer conservation ethic of individuals and corporations.Planting more trees (at least he didn't blame them for air pollution)
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1995
A key legislative committee last night approved a 15-month delay in starting tougher vehicle emissions testing in Maryland, but not before opponents to the controversial smog-control program mounted a strong push to repeal the law altogether.By a 14-6 vote, the House Environmental Matters Committee approved the delay, which had the backing of Gov. Parris N. Glendening and legislative leaders.The vote in Annapolis came just after the panel narrowly defeated a competing bill that supporters argued would "send a message" to the Environmental Protection Agency in Washington about the unpopular testing program.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 6, 1995
A civil libertarian has every right to rotten teeth. If a man or woman wishes to reject modern dentistry, daily brushing, twice-weekly flossing, even the use of tap water containing fluoride, it's OK with me. American society, through its government, should not force anyone to have an healthy mouth.The introduction of fluoride to municipal water supplies was once regarded as an "intrusive" government action, a commie plot to poison "our vital bodily fluids" (see Hayden, Sterling; "Dr. Strangelove," 1964)
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