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NEWS
January 6, 2012
Your article on autism ("Hidden in plain sight," 1/1/2012) was clear, interesting, and also insulting to those on the autism spectrum, since it treated these conditions as disorders. I know that, officially, they are disorders, but as someone with a number of Asperger-like traits and a number of Aspie friends, I ask you to consider that the official word here might be wrong. While autism and related conditions (like Asperger's syndrome) carry characteristic deficits, they also involve characteristic strengths.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Emilie Eastman, Capital News Service | December 12, 2013
Under a blanket of falling snow, the Mall in Columbia gave no indication on an early morning that in one short hour it would erupt with the chaos of holiday shopping. Inside, the only patrons were a group of families taking advantage of a special opportunity to meet Santa Claus — without waiting in line. For the past several years, the Howard County Autism Society has partnered with the Mall in Columbia to host "Sensory Friendly Santa," a chance for children on the autism spectrum to visit with Santa and get their picture taken without the traditional lights, noise and chaos that might distract or irritate them.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Data entry is repetitive and hard to do well - that is, quickly and accurately. Shane Foley is great at it. The 21-year-old Ellicott City man works on two computer screens, eyeing images of handwritten sheets on one and clicking the information into a program on the other. His boss gives him a glowing review. So does the head of the state agency whose contract he's working on. Really something for a young man whose neurologist told his parents, many years ago, to consider institutionalizing him. Foley, who has autism, is the first employee of a program for Marylanders with autism-spectrum disorders.
NEWS
May 21, 2013
Regarding your article about the teen girl accused of plotting her father's murder with her boyfriend ("Troubled child on a dark path," May 19), I found the article filled with misleading information and misinformation. First, the article tells us she "struggled with mental health" issues, leading us to believe that it was those issues that resulted in the tragedy that occurred. Yet we get no further information on these "mental health issues. " The next sentence tells us she has Asperger's.
NEWS
May 21, 2013
Regarding your article about the teen girl accused of plotting her father's murder with her boyfriend ("Troubled child on a dark path," May 19), I found the article filled with misleading information and misinformation. First, the article tells us she "struggled with mental health" issues, leading us to believe that it was those issues that resulted in the tragedy that occurred. Yet we get no further information on these "mental health issues. " The next sentence tells us she has Asperger's.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | February 20, 2012
Babies who develop autism later in life may show signs of the disease in their brain development as early as six months old, new research has found. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis , the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and other institutions looked at brain scans taken on babies at night while they were sleeping. The scans indicate autism may develp in infants over time, according to the findings published online in the American Journal of Psychiatry . By aged 24 months, 28 of 92 infants showed the medical signs for autism spectrum disorders.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | April 10, 2013
Nonprofit organizations abound in Howard County, and Howard Magazine highlights who they are, what they do and how you can help. Name: Howard County Autism Society Who: Judy Grusso, executive director What is your mission? The Howard County Autism Society provides information, support and advocacy and promotes awareness of autism that values the dignity and uniqueness of each individual.    What kinds of programs and services do you provide? Last year, we served more than 2,000 people.
NEWS
By Emilie Eastman, Capital News Service | December 12, 2013
Under a blanket of falling snow, the Mall in Columbia gave no indication on an early morning that in one short hour it would erupt with the chaos of holiday shopping. Inside, the only patrons were a group of families taking advantage of a special opportunity to meet Santa Claus — without waiting in line. For the past several years, the Howard County Autism Society has partnered with the Mall in Columbia to host "Sensory Friendly Santa," a chance for children on the autism spectrum to visit with Santa and get their picture taken without the traditional lights, noise and chaos that might distract or irritate them.
NEWS
By Michelle Landrum | April 8, 2010
The life I had anticipated for my younger son changed the day I learned he has an autism spectrum disorder. But his diagnosis also changed the life I envisioned for myself — for the better. I finally had an explanation for his unusual behavior, and a goal to help find crucial answers about autism. With April as Autism Awareness Month, I offer a personal perspective on my son's diagnosis and an invitation to similar parents to channel their quest for answers into important research.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 16, 2012
A simple “pull-to-sit” test on infants at six months old may help doctors predict autismand other delays, a new study has found. The study by Kennedy Krieger Institute researchers looked at infants at high genetic risk for autism and found many had weak head and neck control. A large number went on to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders, though some had other, more mild language or social delays. The test, added to other developmental measurements already taken of babies, would provide a red flag for parents of all infants, said Dr. Rebecca Landa, study author and director of Kennedy Krieger's Center for Autism and Related Disorders.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Data entry is repetitive and hard to do well - that is, quickly and accurately. Shane Foley is great at it. The 21-year-old Ellicott City man works on two computer screens, eyeing images of handwritten sheets on one and clicking the information into a program on the other. His boss gives him a glowing review. So does the head of the state agency whose contract he's working on. Really something for a young man whose neurologist told his parents, many years ago, to consider institutionalizing him. Foley, who has autism, is the first employee of a program for Marylanders with autism-spectrum disorders.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | April 10, 2013
Nonprofit organizations abound in Howard County, and Howard Magazine highlights who they are, what they do and how you can help. Name: Howard County Autism Society Who: Judy Grusso, executive director What is your mission? The Howard County Autism Society provides information, support and advocacy and promotes awareness of autism that values the dignity and uniqueness of each individual.    What kinds of programs and services do you provide? Last year, we served more than 2,000 people.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 16, 2012
A simple “pull-to-sit” test on infants at six months old may help doctors predict autismand other delays, a new study has found. The study by Kennedy Krieger Institute researchers looked at infants at high genetic risk for autism and found many had weak head and neck control. A large number went on to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders, though some had other, more mild language or social delays. The test, added to other developmental measurements already taken of babies, would provide a red flag for parents of all infants, said Dr. Rebecca Landa, study author and director of Kennedy Krieger's Center for Autism and Related Disorders.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | February 20, 2012
Babies who develop autism later in life may show signs of the disease in their brain development as early as six months old, new research has found. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis , the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and other institutions looked at brain scans taken on babies at night while they were sleeping. The scans indicate autism may develp in infants over time, according to the findings published online in the American Journal of Psychiatry . By aged 24 months, 28 of 92 infants showed the medical signs for autism spectrum disorders.
NEWS
January 6, 2012
Your article on autism ("Hidden in plain sight," 1/1/2012) was clear, interesting, and also insulting to those on the autism spectrum, since it treated these conditions as disorders. I know that, officially, they are disorders, but as someone with a number of Asperger-like traits and a number of Aspie friends, I ask you to consider that the official word here might be wrong. While autism and related conditions (like Asperger's syndrome) carry characteristic deficits, they also involve characteristic strengths.
NEWS
By Dawn Koplos | September 27, 2010
Seven years ago, I wrote a piece about life with my son, who had recently been diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, and the challenges we faced. Little did I know that in the course of researching that article — and upon learning about the huge (epidemic) number of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders — my life's path was about to be forever altered. I went on to become executive director of Pathfinders for Autism, a statewide nonprofit dedicated to helping Maryland's families affected by autism — a position I was proud to hold for five years.
NEWS
By Dawn Koplos | November 4, 2003
IN 1993, there were 260 students in Maryland's schools identified as autistic. In 2002, there were 3,488. It's a staggering increase. Similar increases have been reported across the country and internationally. In July, U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson said: "The number of people diagnosed with autism is on the rise. The impact on families as well as autism's profound effect on the nation's educational and health care systems points to the need for a better understanding of this troubling condition."
NEWS
By Dawn Koplos | September 27, 2010
Seven years ago, I wrote a piece about life with my son, who had recently been diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, and the challenges we faced. Little did I know that in the course of researching that article — and upon learning about the huge (epidemic) number of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders — my life's path was about to be forever altered. I went on to become executive director of Pathfinders for Autism, a statewide nonprofit dedicated to helping Maryland's families affected by autism — a position I was proud to hold for five years.
NEWS
By Michelle Landrum | April 8, 2010
The life I had anticipated for my younger son changed the day I learned he has an autism spectrum disorder. But his diagnosis also changed the life I envisioned for myself — for the better. I finally had an explanation for his unusual behavior, and a goal to help find crucial answers about autism. With April as Autism Awareness Month, I offer a personal perspective on my son's diagnosis and an invitation to similar parents to channel their quest for answers into important research.
NEWS
By Dawn Koplos | November 4, 2003
IN 1993, there were 260 students in Maryland's schools identified as autistic. In 2002, there were 3,488. It's a staggering increase. Similar increases have been reported across the country and internationally. In July, U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson said: "The number of people diagnosed with autism is on the rise. The impact on families as well as autism's profound effect on the nation's educational and health care systems points to the need for a better understanding of this troubling condition."
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