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NEWS
April 9, 2012
Criticism of the Supreme Court is neither new nor unprecedented ("Obama and judicial review," April 6). However, what is unprecedented is criticism coupled with a challenge to the court's authority to overturn unconstitutional laws passed by Congress, particularly coming from President Barack Obama, who is supposedly a constitutional scholar. Jerrold L. Brotman, Timonium
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
More than two years after indicting a former online gambling mogul, federal prosecutors in Maryland say they continue to pursue his extradition on charges of running an illegal gambling business and money laundering. The disclosure, made Friday in U.S. District Court in Maryland, is contained in the first filing in the case since Calvin Ayre, 53, and others associated with his Bodog.com operation were indicted in February 2012. All four defendants remain at large, and Ayre — who is a Canadian citizen — is listed as one of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's "Most Wanted" fugitives In the filing, Assistant U.S. Attorney Richard C. Kay asks for the case to be marked as administratively closed while extradition proceedings play out. Kay wrote that in July, he and a defense attorney had reached an agreement in principle to resolve the case but were unable to finalize it. "The parties intend to continue to try to find a resolution that will not require extradition of the defendants, but, in the meantime, I am pursuing extradition," wrote Kay, who added that Ayre is believed to be in Canada or Antigua.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
The Maryland Transportation Authority has thrown some cold water on the idea of leasing the Intercounty Connector as a relatively pain-free way of raising money to pay for other projects - saying such deals are too complex to enter into without extensive study. In a position paper sent to the legislature, the authority does not rule out privatization deals but warns “they are not easy and should be approached prudently.” The authority's statement comes in response to a bill from a Republican delegate that would require the state to issue an invitation for bids for the ICC and the Express Toll Lanes being built on Interstate 95 by the end of the year, but it also addresses one of the ideas raised by Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller in a comprehensive transportation revenue bill.   Miller has proposed a study of the merits of entering into a long-term lease of the ICC to provide near-term funds for large transportation projects.
NEWS
By Linda Burkins and For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Dani Pettrey is a Harford county-based author of best-selling inspirational romantic suspense. The first four books in Dani's “Alaskan Courage” series have won numerous Christian fiction awards. Each book revolves around a member of Alaska's McKenna family and offers a generous helping of danger and intrigue. “Stranded,” the third book in the series, recently received a Daphne du Maurier Award. Catching up with Pettrey, we hear about her writing adventures and her plans for future stories.
NEWS
January 22, 2014
Prince George's County Council member Mary Lehman and her colleagues have no authority to raise the minimum wage, to mandate what private businesses must pay their employees. That is a matter solely between employer and employees. Lehman says, regarding her idea to raise the minimum wage, "We have to take care of our citizens. " Well, employers are citizens, too, and when the government forces them to pay higher wages that means fewer other citizens will become employees, will have jobs, as Toucan Taco owner Ginger Reeves indicated in your news story.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | January 16, 2014
Delaying action on spending more money on plans for a countywide consolidated water and sewer agency was the prudent thing for the Harford County Board of Estimates to do. Before the Board last week was a contract with a Bowie firm for $831,000 to put together the organizational infrastructure of what is proposed to be a semi-autonomous county water and sewer authority that would consolidate the management of the various water and sewer systems serving...
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | January 23, 2013
A federal judge has ruled that the IRS doesn't have the authority to regulate tax preparers. This stunning ruling, though, is unlikely to have much impact in Maryland, which also regulates this group. “Maryland law was passed before the IRS regulations. We're still registering tax preparers and (they're) still in violation of Maryland law without being registered,” said Douglas Blackstone, executive director of the Maryland Board of Individual Tax Preparers. The state has about 3,700 registered preparers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2011
I caught Ed Henry's first report on Fox News Monday. At least, that's the way host Martha MacCallum described his appearance at 1:30 p.m. from the White House. Henry was reporting on the debt crisis -- nothing like jumping into a raging river feet first. But, as always, he was the steady, informed, on-top-of-it Ed Henry whom CNN viewers have been lucky enough to have covering the White House for them in recent years. Fox has made some moves that were not so brilliant lately -- like getting far too involved in Republican presidential politics.
NEWS
October 12, 2003
Two months after discovering what the chief called a "design flaw" in pistols purchased for the Maryland Transportation Authority's more than 400 police officers, 450 new handguns arrived last week to replace them. The .40-caliber Glocks will be handed out in the coming week as officers are trained to use them, said authority Police Chief Gary W. McLhinney. The new guns were paid for with $230,000 in emergency procurement money, he said. The Berettas originally purchased were not reliably firing when the trigger was pulled, McLhinney said.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1995
As he wiped snowflakes off his glasses yesterday afternoon, 8-year-old Kedrick McIntye explained that on most days, his mother can't pick him up from Federal Hill Elementary until 4 p.m. So he usually spends the 3 o'clock hour helping teachers to clean everything from hallways to blackboards."
FEATURES
By Lisa Driscoll and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
After 13 years of experience in Maryland real estate, David Orso decided to use his skills to better equip those entering the housing market by writing a book. That this effort would also become a way to pay tribute to his wife was a heartbreaking coincidence. The book, "Step Inside: The Unfiltered Truth About Listing and Selling Your Home," reveals insider advice on finding the best agent, listing and pricing a home, roles of listing agents, and how to go from listed to sold smoothly.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
A Towson University student was arrested this week after he allegedly threatened on social media to carry out an attack at the college that he said would be "Virginia Tech part 2. " Matthew David Cole, 18, was charged Thursday with making threats of mass violence and disturbing the operation of the school. He posted $100,000 bail and was released from jail Friday. "A thorough investigation is continuing, however, at this time it has been determined that there is no longer a threat to the university community," officials wrote in an email to students and staff.
NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Rumors often circulated that Tom Clancy's thrillers were so detailed in their descriptions of military and covert operations that the FBI had investigated the Baltimore novelist to determine his sources for works such as "The Hunt for Red October. " After Clancy's death in October 2013, The Baltimore Sun submitted a Freedom of Information Act request for any FBI files on Clancy. The FBI sent back 46 pages, including several redacted pages of background checks federal authorities had conducted.
NEWS
September 25, 2014
President Barack Obama went to the United Nations this week to rally the world against what he called "the network of death" embodied by the Islamic State and other extremist groups that have captured large parts of Iraq and Syria in recent months. Mr. Obama said that such groups only understand "the language of force" and that confronting their brutality compels the world "to look into the heart of darkness. " But for all the president's soaring rhetoric about the need to defeat ISIS, it's unclear whether he can do that without putting American boots on the ground - something he has repeatedly ruled out - or whether he could survive the political fallout at home from doing so if that eventually became necessary.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
The state fire marshal and the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms are investigating an fire early Sunday that consumed a vacant building at the former Bainbridge Naval Station. More than 30 firefighters from several jurisdictions in Maryland and Pennsylvania worked for nearly three hours to contain the Cecil County blaze, which began just before 3 a.m. The three-story stone and mortar building was originally constructed in 1901 as the Tome School for Boys and later operated as a naval training center from 1942 to 1976.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 21, 2014
My mother was a child abuser. I was, too. In fact, growing up, pretty much every parent I knew abused their kids. Or so many of Adrian Peterson's critics would have you believe. Mr. Peterson, a star of the Minnesota Vikings, was arrested recently for child abuse after hitting his 4-year-old son with a switch. A "switch," for those who don't know, is a long twig. I should know, having been on the receiving end of quite a few. When no switch was available, mom was also known to employ a section of the orange plastic track from my Hot Wheels.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and BUILD, a community group, are planning to unveil tonight a novel public authority that would pay for after-school programs for city public school students.The programs would include recreation and cultural and academic enrichment activities.Mr. Schmoke plans to raise at least $1.5 million in start-up money from private sources to fund programs beginning in September in 10 city schools, said spokesman Clinton R. Coleman.But one of the mayor's funding ideas -- a 25-cent tax on tickets for the Orioles and Baltimore's new professional football franchise -- is already in trouble.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
Angry that the Housing Authority of Baltimore City has not completed all repairs necessary for ending a rent strike at Lexington Terrace, residents set up a picket line at the West Baltimore complex this week.The residents were to attend a hearing yesterday on the 2-month-old strike. But District Judge Theodore Oshrine postponed the hearing after the authority admitted it had not completed repairs, an attorney for the residents said.Sally Gold, a private attorney hired by the authority, contended the agency has made most of the repairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The photos of author Robert Timberg in recent years aren't as horrifying as his memoir leads readers to expect. His eyes are direct and unflinching, and his mouth expresses wry amusement. He has the kind of wrinkles normally found on a 74-year-old man and a patch of skin across his nose that at a casual glance appears sunburned. There's nothing about Timberg's appearance now that could be described as freakish, nothing that would cause young children to howl in fright. It's taken Timberg more than 35 operations - including one without anesthesia - and 47 years to achieve that face, and he's still not entirely reconciled to it. There are moments even now when he looks in the mirror and is first startled, then furious.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
For two years, the crew of the USS Jeannette was trapped in ice north of the Bering Sea. The sailors staged musicals, played football, ate seal meat (which they dubbed "arctic turkey") and even performed surgery on the eye of a crew member afflicted with syphilis. Then, in June 1881, the real adventure began: The Jeannette sank. The men loaded their provisions onto dog sleds and began the trek to Siberia, some 1,000 miles away. Journalist Hampton Sides tells the story of the Jeannette's star-crossed expedition in his latest book, "In the Kingdom of Ice. " Sides spent more than three years poring over thousands of pages of records kept by the ship's captain, letters, diary entries and testimony from the 13 men who survived the brutal journey.
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