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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | July 23, 1993
A small, landlocked country ensconced in central Europe certainly played a major role in the cultural life of Annapolis last weekend.But, then again, Austria -- the country of Haydn, Mozart and Schubert and the adopted home of Beethoven and Brahms -- has been cutting a monumental swath through the musical landscape for centuries. Why should Annapolis be left out?The first wave of the Austrian invasion came Friday evening at the Great Hall at St. John's College in a concert by the Viennese Vocal Ensemble, a 31-member choir directed by Dr. Manfred Linsbauer.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Somewhere on a lonely road in Kansas, about halfway through his 2,989.5-mile bicycle trek across the United States, Christoph Strasser, a 30-year-old former bike messenger, made a decision. He wouldn't simply win the Race Across America, the famously grueling coast-to-coast ultra-marathon cycling competition now in its 32nd year. He would break its long-standing record for speed. When he crossed the finish line Wednesday at Annapolis City Dock, grimacing and holding high the red-and-white flag of his native Austria, Strasser achieved both goals.
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SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | August 28, 1992
Neil Austrian, the president of the NFL, said last night that the league will expand "fairly quickly" if it wins the antitrust trial in Minneapolis.Austrian said a courtroom victory would mean that the NFL would stick to its timetable of expanding by "this fall," but wouldn't set a definite date. He said only that the fall meant before the end of the year.The top aide to commissioner Paul Tagliabue, Austrian was in Baltimore to attend last night's preseason game and to meet with representatives of the three groups bidding for a franchise in Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2010
Shanlei Cardwell could not fathom why so many people had wanted to kill the engaging old man standing before her. Meredith O'Connell laughed at his jokes and wondered how he had the spirit to tell them after all he'd endured. Both teenagers sensed that they'd be talking about Leo Bretholz for decades to come, that they would take on a small part of the quest that has driven him for almost 50 years. For all that time, Bretholz has crisscrossed the Baltimore area telling his harrowing tale of eluding capture and death as an Austrian Jew living in Europe through the Holocaust.
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Julian E. Barnes and Louise Roug and Julian E. Barnes,Los Angeles Times | November 18, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- U.S. and British troops clashed with gunmen in southern Iraq yesterday after the kidnapping of four Americans and an Austrian near the site of the battle. While Iraqi authorities reported that at least two Iraqis had been killed in the crossfire, there were conflicting reports about whether the gunfight was tied to the Thursday abduction and about the fate of the five men. All five were private security guards who were seized along with nine other people near the Kuwait border.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1997
Gospel singers from Carroll County were blessed by amazing grace on a five-day trip to Austria. The group had Viennese audience members more accustomed to the classics on their feet, clapping and swaying to music born in America.The 22-voice choir, a mix of ages and races from Union Street United Methodist Church and Western Maryland College in Westminster, participated in the 14th Vienna Advent Concert the weekend before Christmas."The choir really moved the audiences," said Eric B. Byrd, choir director.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN BOOK EDITOR | October 8, 2004
The Nobel Prize in literature was awarded yesterday to Austrian novelist, poet and playwright Elfriede Jelinek, a feminist writer with an uncompromisingly dark, disturbing and occasionally brutal vision of human nature. Jelinek, a little-known author on this side of the Atlantic but one of the most celebrated voices in the German language, was lauded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for "her musical flow of voices and counter-voices in novels and plays that with extraordinary linguistic zeal reveal the absurdity of society's cliches and their subjugating power."
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg and John Eisenberg,Staff Correspondent | February 10, 1992
VAL D'ISERE, France -- A big, broad-shouldered Austrian long shot won the men's downhill of the Winter Olympics yesterday, a fitting resolution to a day at the races that was nothing if not strange.The first of 56 skiers to come down a stunning and controversial course loaded with speed-killing turns, Patrick Ortlieb, a 24-year-old from Bregenz, finished five-hundredths of a second faster than France's Franck Piccard. Another Austrian, Guenther Mader, was third.AJ Kitt, considered the United States' best medal hope in any skiing event, finished ninth.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1995
For Ottomar Herrmann, his traveling Lipizzaner stallion show is all about "the art of the horses." But the producer of a competing show calls Mr. Herrmann's group "a circus family" whose claims of historical significance are dubious.And a press officer at the Austrian Embassy in Washington says the Spanish Riding School in Vienna, home of the famous breed of white horses, won't have anything to do with either one of them.The only authentic Lipizzan shows are at the riding school in Austria, said Hedwig Sommer, the embassy press officer.
SPORTS
By ALAN ABRAHAMSON and ALAN ABRAHAMSON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 25, 2006
No evidence of doping was detected in samples from 10 Austrian skiers who had to submit to surprise drug tests last weekend, the International Olympic Committee said yesterday. Urine tests conducted on the skiers - six cross-country skiers and four biathletes - turned up no evidence of the use of stimulants, anabolic steroids or even micro-doses of the synthetic blood-doping hormone called erythropoietin, or EPO, the IOC said. Follow-up blood tests either have been conducted or will be conducted on members of the Austrian team, the chair of the IOC's medical commission, Arne Ljungqvist of Sweden, said.
SPORTS
By Chris Dufresne and Tribune Olympic Bureau | February 27, 2010
Men's slalom, the last Olympic Alpine event, also provides last chances for Bode Miller and the Austrians. Miller has already won three medals at the Vancouver Games, three more than the entire Austrian men's team. Winner of the gold in super combined, silver in super G and the bronze in downhill, Miller was last seen last Tuesday skiing back to his condo after skiing out of the giant slalom. As for his chances in today's slalom, think back to Dave Kingman's strikeout-to-home run ratio.
SPORTS
By Chris Dufresne and Tribune Olympic Bureau | February 23, 2010
WHISTLER, British Columbia - Based on Olympic Alpine results so far, Austria has to be flat, like Kansas. The country's strengths are likely table tennis or microbrewing - it can't be Alpine skiing. As the Vancouver Games enter their last week, Austria's manly ski men have yet to earn a medal. They'll get their next chance in the men's giant slalom Tuesday at Whistler Creekside. With any luck, 45 guys will fall down and Austria can sneak in for the bronze. The women have two medals - the same number as one American: Julia Mancuso, who hadn't finished top-three in a race that mattered in two years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 4, 2010
When Alfred Brendel, the revered Austrian pianist, gave his farewell performance in Vienna in 2008 after 60 years before the public, it was certainly the end of an era. But it may also have marked the beginning of one, since a likely heir to Brendel's artistic legacy is already here: Till Fellner. The 37-year-old Fellner, slated to make his Baltimore debut Saturday, is also Austrian. He studied with Brendel and, like that seasoned artist, devotes most of his attention to the likes of Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert and Schumann.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Allison Connolly and Chris Emery and Allison Connolly,Sun reporters | February 25, 2008
Norbert L. Grunwald, an Austrian-born U.S. Army veteran who was taken prisoner by the Nazis during the Battle of the Bulge and later worked in American intelligence and for a brokerage in Baltimore, died of complications of prostate cancer Friday at his Baltimore home. He was 83 years old. Mr. Grunwald was born in Vienna, Austria. When he was 13, Nazi forces took over his country, and he fled alone and on foot to Poland. On the first night of his journey he was picked up by the Nazis, said his wife, Louise.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,Los Angeles Times | September 8, 2007
VIENNA -- Pope Benedict XVI stood silently yesterday before a large stone monument to Austrian Jews slaughtered in the Holocaust, offering a gesture of what he described as "sadness and repentance." The visit was a significant start to a three-day pilgrimage to Austria to lend succor to a Catholic Church still troubled by a series of sexual abuse scandals, plummeting membership and sapped influence. The visit to Austria will allow the pope to emphasize some of his favorite themes, including what he sees as the essential Christian identity of Europe, particularly as it is undermined by secularism and fast-growing Muslim immigration.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 19, 2007
Leonardo da Vinci thought that our souls are composed of harmony. Whenever I hear music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart or Anton Bruckner, I'm inclined to agree. If you go The BSO performs at 8 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Sunday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 8 p.m. Saturday at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda. $25-$55. 410-783-8000, baltimoresymphony.org.
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 22, 1996
SAVANNAH, Ga. -- When Austrian Hubert Raudaschl's 22-foot keelboat hits the Atlantic Ocean today, he will become the first man in history to have competed in nine Olympic Games.He says it is 10. He counts the 1960 Games in Rome, where he qualified as an alternate but never left the dock.Olympic historians insist it is nine. They say you can't simply show up and be considered an Olympian.Anyway, nine will still be the most ever, covering an amazing 32 years, beginning in Tokyo and hopefully ending right-side up.All of which greatly irritates a couple of Italian horseback riders and two other sailors, one from Denmark, one from the Bahamas.
NEWS
By Hans Knight | July 28, 1996
IT SEEMS A LITTLE silly now, 60 years later, but it felt right at the time, even glorious, and it still warms my heart thinking about it. There we were, a bunch of impeccably white Austrian kids, running through the Vienna woods, faces smeared with itchy black show polish, intermittently yelling, "Oo-Eas-Ah."Adults who saw us did double takes. Some smiled tolerantly, others touched forefingers to frowning brows. We didn't care.This was 1936, and in far-off Berlin, they were holding the Olympic Games.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | March 29, 2007
Dr. Robert Austrian, an internationally known expert in the prevention of pneumococcal diseases whose research led to the development of the pneumonia vaccine that has saved countless lives worldwide, died Sunday of a stroke at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The former Baltimorean was 90. "Bob was a pioneer in understanding pneumococcal diseases. He was very studious, competent and a model of the academic research physician," said Dr. Richard S. Ross, a longtime friend, and dean emeritus of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Julian E. Barnes and Louise Roug and Julian E. Barnes,Los Angeles Times | November 18, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- U.S. and British troops clashed with gunmen in southern Iraq yesterday after the kidnapping of four Americans and an Austrian near the site of the battle. While Iraqi authorities reported that at least two Iraqis had been killed in the crossfire, there were conflicting reports about whether the gunfight was tied to the Thursday abduction and about the fate of the five men. All five were private security guards who were seized along with nine other people near the Kuwait border.
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