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NEWS
October 2, 1996
Austria is putting 1,000 candles on its birthday cake this year, and Western Maryland College is celebrating with a party on this side of the Atlantic.This year's German-American Day Friday will be devoted to Austria, the second-largest German-speaking nation, said Mohamed Esa, assistant professor of foreign languages.Most of the celebration is free and open to the public. "Osterreich -- 1,000 Jahre" (Austria -- 1,000 Years) will feature an Austrian musician, an Austrian diplomat and WMC professors.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Ingeborg F. Harrington, a homemaker and gourmet cook who was known for her memorable dinner parties, died of heart failure Friday at Manor Care Ruxton. She was 91. The daughter of Wilhelm Leuschner, a mechanical engineer, and Angela Schwarzer Leuschner, a homemaker, Ingeborg Franviska Leuschner was born and raised in Ternitz, Austria, where she graduated from local public schools. She became an avid hiker and an accomplished skier and was a member of the ski rescue team. She studied at the Vienna Conservatory of Music.
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NEWS
September 5, 2003
Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele is in Vienna, Austria, this week, part of the U.S. delegation to the Conference on Racism, Xenophobia and Discrimination, held by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. The U.S. contingent is headed by former Oklahoma Rep. J.C. Watts, a fellow Republican. It is Steele's third international trip of the summer, having previously visited the Paris Air Show and Barbados. Steele's travel and accommodations for the anti-racism conference are being paid for by the U.S. State Department, although Maryland taxpayers will pay for the two troopers accompanying him.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Leo Bretholz, a Holocaust survivor who became a major voice in the campaign to gain reparations from companies that transported victims to concentration camps during World War II, died Saturday in his sleep of unknown causes at his Pikesville home. He was 93. Mr. Bretholz was scheduled to testify Monday in the Maryland House of Delegates on a bill that would require the French railroad company SNCF, which is seeking a $6 billion contract from the state of Maryland to operate the Purple Line, to pay reparations to U.S. Holocaust survivors.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 25, 1992
VIENNA, Austria -- Thomas Klestil, the chief of Austria's diplomatic corps and a former ambassador to the United States, was elected yesterday to succeed President Kurt Waldheim, whose record as an officer in Hitler's army isolated the country diplomatically for six years.In a runoff between the top two candidates to emerge from initial voting last month, Mr. Klestil, the 59-year-old candidate of the conservative People's Party, received more than 56 percent of the votes, against about 43 percent for Rudolf Streicher, the Social Democratic candidate and a former minister of transport and state industries.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | April 19, 2006
Gruner veltliner is a little-known (outside Austria) but very fine white-wine variety, and this example is an excellent version at a reasonable price. It's a dry but fruity wine with penetrating flavors of lime, apple, sweet pea, fresh asparagus and minerals. Its aroma is very fresh and reminiscent of wet stone. Its finish is long and satisfying. Serve with white-fleshed fish, Southeast Asian cuisine.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff writer | May 6, 1992
Members of the F.A.M.E. Orchestra are eager to stretch their strings in Austria this summer.F.A.M.E. (For the Advancement of Music Ensemble) is a 52-piece string ensemble of teen-agers from public and private schools in the Baltimore area, including about 10 from Howard County.The musicians, ages 13 to 18, have been invited to play in the International String Workshop in Graz, Austria, this summer. About 40 members will actually go, and they will be the only student orchestra in the workshop.
NEWS
February 5, 2000
NOW that Austria has a government embracing extremist xenophobes in coalition with traditional conservatives, statesmen of Europe are eating half their words. Joerg Haider, an anti-immigrant demagogue who sounds like a neo-Nazi some of the time, led his Freedom Party to second place in last October's election. Despite the distaste of Austrian President Thomas Klestil, parliamentary democracy gave him no options. The new regime is headed by a reasonable conservative, Wolfgang Schuessel, with Mr. Haider tactfully staying out. The two repudiated Austria's Nazi heritage before the swearing-in, however insincerely on Mr. Haider's part.
NEWS
March 1, 2000
ISOLATING Austria within the European Union, for including the xenophobic Freedom Party in government, may boomerang. It could provoke the national self-pity needed to propel that party's playful demagogic leader, Joerg Haider, into the chancellorship, or prime ministry, of Austria. But the policy is having a positive effect in EU countries, isolating ultra-nationalist parties in France, Belgium and Germany. There is no sign that the ostracism of Austria's ambassadors will end just because Mr. Haider stepped down as the Freedom Party's leader.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 15, 2000
LIPICA, Slovenia -- In the autumn of 1943, during the systematic plunder of all that lay within its grasp, Hitler's army snatched about 200 prize Lippizaner stallions and mares from their ancestral home, a 400-year-old stud farm in Lipica, Slovenia. The horses, famous for their white coats and high-stepping dressage at Vienna's Spanish Riding School, were shipped to a stud farm in German-occupied Czechoslovakia. There they remained until Nazi Germany collapsed in May 1945. Gen. George S. Patton's troops were in Austria, and it was clear from the fighting that the Russians would soon be the postwar masters of Czechoslovakia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2014
Dan Trahey plays the tuba. He's played it all his life, and he takes his instrument with him everywhere, even though it's been years since he's performed regularly with an orchestra. Trahey's affinity for the unwieldy, decidedly uncool contraption says a lot about him. The tuba partly explains how Trahey has helped make OrchKids - the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program that puts musical instruments into the hands of schoolchildren regardless of their ability - into a national model for teaching life skills to youngsters in impoverished neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
The Rev. Eric W. Gritsch, a prominent Lutheran theologian, educator and author whose teaching career at the Lutheran Theological Seminary in Gettysburg, Pa., spanned more than three decades, died Dec. 29 at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center of complications from an infection. The longtime Canton resident was 81. Michael Cooper-White, president of the Lutheran Theological Seminary called Dr. Gritsch, "one of the giants in 20th-century Lutheranism. " "I am among hundreds of women and men privileged to have sat at his feet during his third of a century as a professor here at Gettysburg Seminary," he said.
NEWS
By Peggy Rowe | September 2, 2012
This is the time each year when America celebrates labor. When better for a story about a family who risked their very lives for the opportunity to work in America? Despite frequent criticism of organized religion, there are times when the church gets it right. Such was the case in 1957, when a local middle-class congregation made a difference in the lives of a family from halfway around the world. Who would have thought that an act of kindness could have such a lasting impact on a family and a community?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2012
Tired of the same old familiar varietals like tempranillo and sangiovese? For something truly exotic, expand your horizons to include zweigelt, a red variety from Austria. In previous vintages, I wasn't impressed, but Zantho's 2010 is a winner. It's a light, fruity style of red - kind of like a cross between a pinot noir and a Gamay from Beaujolais. This wine offers vibrant black cherry and wild berry flavors with hints of black pepper and earth. Though the wine isn't weighty, the finish is long.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
Dr. Ernst Friedrich Lepold Niedermeyer, who was a leading researcher, author, clinician and pioneer in the field of electroencephalogy and its use in epilepsy and other brain research, died Thursday of colon cancer at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. The longtime Towson resident was 92. "He was one of the senior people in his field at his passing and widely respected. His textbook, 'Electroencephalography,' is the standard in the field," said Dr. Ronald P. Lesser, professor of neurology and neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Aireythewinekey@aol.com | September 29, 2011
Just one sip is all it takes. That first swallow explodes with flavors not usually attributed to the grape: Arugula, sugar snap peas, moss, heather, lentils. There is a bracing and refreshing minerality, plus a weight on the palate that belies its flavor profile. The wine is surprisingly dense and chewy for an unoaked white wine. Just one sip will take you by surprise, but so will its name: gruner veltliner (grooner-velt-leaner). It's a struggle to verbalize, but not to internalize.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 8, 1997
VIENNA, Austria -- The men of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra play a music they say is unique. It is a sound of distinctly full brass and velvety strings, with masterfully balanced rests and fortes, a sound shaped by Brahms and Mahler, a sound -- some musicians say -- that only this all-male, all-white orchestra can make.The claims of some members that the exclusionary policies of the philharmonic give the ensemble its greatness have created a furor -- one quieted but not resolved when the orchestra voted last week to admit women for the first time in its 155-year history.
FEATURES
January 27, 2006
Jan. 27-- 1756: Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born in Salzburg, Austria. 1973: The Vietnam peace accords were signed in Paris.
NEWS
August 29, 2011
Charles Campbell argues U.S. jobs are destroyed by free trade ("What's killing jobs?" Aug. 27). While some jobs are destroyed by free trade, overall the jury is in, and he is wrong. The United States was as trade-open in the Clinton years when we created lots of new jobs as it was in the Bush years when we lost jobs. We were protectionist in the run-up to the Great Depression. An alternative way to look at the question is to compare the United States to wealthy countries that currently do well.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 1, 2009
Gerhardt "Gerry" Weiss, a retired pool company executive who was a classical music and opera fan, died Monday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center of complications after surgery for a leg aneurysm. The Towson resident was 88. Mr. Weiss was born to Jewish parents and raised in Vienna, Austria. After the Anschluss, the annexation of Austria by Nazi Germany in 1938, Mr. Weiss fled his native country and settled in New York City, where he was later joined by his parents. He worked for a year in his uncle's New York City pajama factory before moving to Baltimore.
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