Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAustralian Wines
IN THE NEWS

Australian Wines

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | June 8, 1997
Imagine identical twins, separated at birth, with one raised in an ancient French village and the other in the wide-open spaces of Australia. Think they'd turn out a bit differently?You bet. And that's certainly true of the wine world's Franco-Australian twins -- the syrah grape of the Rhone Valley and the shiraz grape from Down Under.In France, the syrah grape produces the silky red wines of Cote Rotie and the majestic wines of Hermitage and Cornas. At their best, these wines rival anything produced in Bordeaux, Burgundy or the Napa Valley for complexity and sheer power.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Wine Critic | October 1, 2003
Hillard Donner said he knew he was in trouble when he peered in the window of his Annapolis wine shop and saw a bottle of Smirnoff vodka float by. "Fifty-seven years, I've never seen anything like this," he said. "I don't ever want to see it again, either." Of the many businesses socked by the tidal surges of Hurricane Isabel, Donner's Mills Wine and Spirits is one of the oldest and the most revered among Maryland wine enthusiasts. Since 1946, Mills has stood its ground at the foot of Main Street, offering one of the best selections of wine in Maryland.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1997
The 70 or so people who will sit down Tuesday evening to braised New Zealand lamb shanks with a berry sauce, accompanied by a 1994 Michelton reserve cabernet sauvignon, also will have a chance to contribute to a local charity.Between the six courses of the prix fixe dinners -- each accompanied by a featured wine -- served an average of 10 times a year at Quail Ridge Inn on Route 27 north of Mount Airy, diners can participate in a silent auction to benefit Carroll County Children's Fund."Carroll County is a very giving county," said Quail Ridge Inn owner Austin Isemann.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | November 6, 2002
To be named chief winemaker at Australia's Penfold's is a little bit like becoming pope of that country's wine industry. The person in that position becomes the guardian of Australia's proudest wine tradition -- the wine known as Grange. It has been called the greatest wine made in the Southern Hemisphere, and its success has inspired two generations of winemakers down under. So here comes Peter Gago breezing through Baltimore, on the job all of three months, telling a critic in a broad Aussie accent that "Grange isn't the be-all and end-all."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Wine Critic | October 1, 2003
Hillard Donner said he knew he was in trouble when he peered in the window of his Annapolis wine shop and saw a bottle of Smirnoff vodka float by. "Fifty-seven years, I've never seen anything like this," he said. "I don't ever want to see it again, either." Of the many businesses socked by the tidal surges of Hurricane Isabel, Donner's Mills Wine and Spirits is one of the oldest and the most revered among Maryland wine enthusiasts. Since 1946, Mills has stood its ground at the foot of Main Street, offering one of the best selections of wine in Maryland.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
Australian wine burst onto the American wine market in the early 1980s like the liquid equivalent of "Crocodile Dundee."In fact, they and the Old Croc-ster had a lot in common. Both were full of burly, rustic charm. And neither demanded to be taken too seriously. At a time when California was descending into its dreary "food wine" phase, the new Australian wines coming into the country had guts and character. They were just the thing to wash down roast reptile.And the prices -- weren't they nice, mate?
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | September 6, 2000
As surely as a platypus is an egg-laying mammal, Americans will work themselves into a frenzy over all things Australian this month as the 2000 Summer Olympic Games open in Sydney. Amid all the Aussie hype, it is unlikely that Australia's thriving wine industry will go unnoticed. Thousands of Americans who will travel to Sydney will be exposed to a wide variety of Australian wines. Chances are, they'll like what they taste because Australia's wine industry is consistently improving. You won't have to travel to Sydney to taste many of Australia's finest wines, however.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | January 25, 1995
Australian wines are for the adventurous. More than those of any major wine-producing country, they seem to lurch from gross to grand in the flicker of a wombat's eyelash.It is especially so with dry white wines. Reds have their protective cloak of color and tannin, dessert wines can mask flaws with sugar and alcohol, but any vulgarity in white wine stands out like Ayre's Rock rising above the outback.Take, for example, one recent encounter with an Australian chardonnay, in this case a single-vineyard 1993 from the well-known Lindemans winery.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | January 11, 1995
Think warm thoughts, people keep telling you this time of year. Think warm thoughts, they say, as if that's going to help dig your car out of the snow.Very well, here's a thought for wine drinkers: Let's blow this crummy Northern Hemisphere and head for Australia, even if only in our minds.From frigid France to the frostbitten Finger Lakes, the vineyards of Europe and America are cold and barren. But in Australia, the vines are lush and green. Vineyard workers swelter under blue summer skies, repairing the fences that will keep the kangaroos from devouring the plump clusters of ripening grapes as vintage time draws near.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | November 6, 2002
To be named chief winemaker at Australia's Penfold's is a little bit like becoming pope of that country's wine industry. The person in that position becomes the guardian of Australia's proudest wine tradition -- the wine known as Grange. It has been called the greatest wine made in the Southern Hemisphere, and its success has inspired two generations of winemakers down under. So here comes Peter Gago breezing through Baltimore, on the job all of three months, telling a critic in a broad Aussie accent that "Grange isn't the be-all and end-all."
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | September 6, 2000
As surely as a platypus is an egg-laying mammal, Americans will work themselves into a frenzy over all things Australian this month as the 2000 Summer Olympic Games open in Sydney. Amid all the Aussie hype, it is unlikely that Australia's thriving wine industry will go unnoticed. Thousands of Americans who will travel to Sydney will be exposed to a wide variety of Australian wines. Chances are, they'll like what they taste because Australia's wine industry is consistently improving. You won't have to travel to Sydney to taste many of Australia's finest wines, however.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | June 8, 1997
Imagine identical twins, separated at birth, with one raised in an ancient French village and the other in the wide-open spaces of Australia. Think they'd turn out a bit differently?You bet. And that's certainly true of the wine world's Franco-Australian twins -- the syrah grape of the Rhone Valley and the shiraz grape from Down Under.In France, the syrah grape produces the silky red wines of Cote Rotie and the majestic wines of Hermitage and Cornas. At their best, these wines rival anything produced in Bordeaux, Burgundy or the Napa Valley for complexity and sheer power.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1997
The 70 or so people who will sit down Tuesday evening to braised New Zealand lamb shanks with a berry sauce, accompanied by a 1994 Michelton reserve cabernet sauvignon, also will have a chance to contribute to a local charity.Between the six courses of the prix fixe dinners -- each accompanied by a featured wine -- served an average of 10 times a year at Quail Ridge Inn on Route 27 north of Mount Airy, diners can participate in a silent auction to benefit Carroll County Children's Fund."Carroll County is a very giving county," said Quail Ridge Inn owner Austin Isemann.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | January 25, 1995
Australian wines are for the adventurous. More than those of any major wine-producing country, they seem to lurch from gross to grand in the flicker of a wombat's eyelash.It is especially so with dry white wines. Reds have their protective cloak of color and tannin, dessert wines can mask flaws with sugar and alcohol, but any vulgarity in white wine stands out like Ayre's Rock rising above the outback.Take, for example, one recent encounter with an Australian chardonnay, in this case a single-vineyard 1993 from the well-known Lindemans winery.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | January 11, 1995
Think warm thoughts, people keep telling you this time of year. Think warm thoughts, they say, as if that's going to help dig your car out of the snow.Very well, here's a thought for wine drinkers: Let's blow this crummy Northern Hemisphere and head for Australia, even if only in our minds.From frigid France to the frostbitten Finger Lakes, the vineyards of Europe and America are cold and barren. But in Australia, the vines are lush and green. Vineyard workers swelter under blue summer skies, repairing the fences that will keep the kangaroos from devouring the plump clusters of ripening grapes as vintage time draws near.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL DRESSER | January 31, 1993
There's something about Australian red wines that's very, well, Australian.There's a charming, no-nonsense informality about them. They might be a bit loud and argumentative, but they're a friendly lot. And while they can be coarse, there's often a lot of depth #F beneath that burly, swaggering exterior.Sure, that's a generalization, about the wine as well as the people. There are, no doubt, dour, reserved, even meager Australian people as well as red wines. I just haven't met many of either.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | January 31, 1993
The following Australian wines, all purchased in Maryland, were tasted in recent weeks. Wines are listed in order of quality within categories. Unfortunately, the Grange Hermitage mentioned in the accompanying article was beyond our budget, but every vintage tasted in the past has been exceptional.Cabernet sauvignon* 1988 Parker Coonawarra Estate, Terra Rossa First Growth ($36). This excellent wine almost lived up to its lofty price tag, but not quite. It has fine concentration, lovely blackberry and cedary flavors, and a seductively creamy feel, but it fell short of what several reviews suggested.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL DRESSER | January 31, 1993
There's something about Australian red wines that's very, well, Australian.There's a charming, no-nonsense informality about them. They might be a bit loud and argumentative, but they're a friendly lot. And while they can be coarse, there's often a lot of depth #F beneath that burly, swaggering exterior.Sure, that's a generalization, about the wine as well as the people. There are, no doubt, dour, reserved, even meager Australian people as well as red wines. I just haven't met many of either.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | January 31, 1993
The following Australian wines, all purchased in Maryland, were tasted in recent weeks. Wines are listed in order of quality within categories. Unfortunately, the Grange Hermitage mentioned in the accompanying article was beyond our budget, but every vintage tasted in the past has been exceptional.Cabernet sauvignon* 1988 Parker Coonawarra Estate, Terra Rossa First Growth ($36). This excellent wine almost lived up to its lofty price tag, but not quite. It has fine concentration, lovely blackberry and cedary flavors, and a seductively creamy feel, but it fell short of what several reviews suggested.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
Australian wine burst onto the American wine market in the early 1980s like the liquid equivalent of "Crocodile Dundee."In fact, they and the Old Croc-ster had a lot in common. Both were full of burly, rustic charm. And neither demanded to be taken too seriously. At a time when California was descending into its dreary "food wine" phase, the new Australian wines coming into the country had guts and character. They were just the thing to wash down roast reptile.And the prices -- weren't they nice, mate?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.