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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | January 30, 1991
Peter Weir, the Australian director, says he chose to write an direct ''Green Card'' because he felt it was time to ''dust off this wonderful and abundant genre.''The ''genre'' is the Hollywood comedies of the '30s nd '40s, movies made by actresses like Irene Dunne, Barbara Stanwyck, Carole Lombard, Jean Arthur and Claudette Colbert.''I didn't exactly grow up with them, but like all people who were raised during the '50s, the old Hollywood film was part of the decade. All those movies were being shown on television, in Australia, and I was taken by them,'' he said.
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NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Lockheed Martin Corp. announced Tuesday that it signed a contract to develop the world's largest wave energy project off Victoria, Australia, calling it a "significant step toward making ocean energy commercially available. " The New Ventures office of Lockheed Martin's Mission Systems and Training Baltimore site signed the deal with Victorian Wave Partners Ltd. to develop a 62.5-megawatt peak power wave energy generation project. The project will use a wave energy converter buoy pioneered by Ocean Power Technologies of Pennington, N.J. As the buoy moves up and down on waves, the mechanical energy drives an electrical generator, which is sent to shore through underwater cables.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1997
NEW YORK -- Andre Agassi lost to No. 13 seed Patrick Rafter the other day and after a moment's thought said that Rafter can't win the U.S. Open. Yesterday, Magnus Larsson walked off the tennis court, a 7-6 (7-4), 6-4, 6-2, loser to Rafter in the quarterfinals and shrugged."In the semifinals, you are not out of the tournament," said Larsson. "Anyone can win."Such a vote of confidence simply made Rafter smile."That's good, huh," he said. "I have a one-in-four chance of winning. That's the way I look at it."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
When Maryland placekicker Brad Craddock showed up for his first lesson with Matt Stover in February, the former Ravens All-Pro was struck by how little the freshman from Australia knew about the mechanics and psychology of kicking. Yet Stover saw something in Craddock that he had seen before with others he had tutored, most notably Jacksonville Jaguars kicker Josh Scobee. As with Scobee, who began working with Stover when he was in high school and later at Louisiana Tech, Stover turned an athlete into a kicker.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,Staff Writer | August 3, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- He was born in Baltimore. He plays for the Bullets. He even got married at the harbor. But Leroy Loggins hardly qualifies as hometown hero.Loggins, 34, isn't a playground legend in Baltimore, he's a member of the Australian men's Olympic basketball team.He plays for the Bullets all right -- the ones in Brisbane. And he got married at the harbor all right -- the one in Sydney.Who is this guy?Loggins said he played only two games at Forest Park High in the mid-1970s before quitting because of a lack of playing time.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1998
NEW YORK -- Pete Sampras was up a set and a break, but down a point, 0-15, in the third set of his U.S. Open match with Patrick Rafter last evening when he made a big lunge for a backhand volley.Sampras reached the volley and won the game. He even won the set. But in a classic example of losing the war, he pulled his left quadriceps muscle and lost his chance at tying Australian Roy Emerson's record of 12 major championships."You know, it shocked me a little bit," Sampras said after losing the semifinal to Rafter, the defending Open champion, 6-7 (8-10)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 28, 2005
SYDNEY, Australia - In a little more than a week, a new grassroots political movement here has gathered more than 7,000 names of supporters on its Web site in a campaign to free David Hicks, an Australian citizen being held in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The organization, GetUp!, was founded in August by two young Australians. They collected the names for a letter to the Australian foreign minister, Alexander Downer, demanding that he take action to have Hicks, 30, brought back to Australia to stand trial.
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 27, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Australian distance swimmer Craig Stevens has stepped off the blocks, opening the way for his friend and teammate, Ian Thorpe, to compete in the 400-meter freestyle at the Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece. Although the decision had been anticipated, Stevens made his announcement on Australian national television last night. Apparently, altruism wasn't Stevens' only motive. Several Australian media outlets reported he received payment for his TV interview. The controversial episode began when Thorpe lost his balance on the starting blocks and tumbled into the pool at the Australian Olympic trials in Sydney in March.
NEWS
November 3, 1994
The Board of Appeals will decide next month whether a cellular phone company can build a 125-foot communications tower near an Ellicott City middle school.The five-member panel plans tomake its decision during a work session Dec. 6 at 7:30 p.m.The board adjourned early yesterday morning after holding two hearings that attracted dozens of residents fearful of electromagneticradiation from the proposed tower.Cellular One, a subsidiary of Southwestern Bell Mobile Systems Inc., wants to build the tower near Patapsco Middle School on land it leases from First Church of the Nazarene on Rogers Avenue.
NEWS
October 1, 1990
SYDNEY, Australia (AP) -- Patrick White, a rancher who turned to writing and won the 1973 Nobel Prize for literature, died at his home yesterday after a lengthy illness. He was 78.The poet, playwright and novelist was born in London and educated at King's College, Cambridge. He worked as a "jackaroo," or rancher, in the Australian state of New South Wales but later returned to England to study languages at Cambridge. He served as an intelligence officer in the Royal Air Force in the Middle East during World War II.His first novel, "Happy Valley," published in 1939, won the Australian Literary Society Gold Medal, as did his novel "The Tree of Man."
SPORTS
By Seth Boster, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
Loyola women's lacrosse coach and former Maryland star Jen Adams will be on the sidelines when her Australian national team begins play Thursday at the Federation of International Lacrosse World Cup in Oshawa, Ontario. The midfielder tore her right ACL while training with the team Thursday in Hunt Valley. The injury happened on a routine shooting drill, Adams said. "I've been extremely fortunate up until this point [in my career]. I really haven't had any injury," she said. "It's a new one - it's a new challenge.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2013
W. R. Grace & Co. of Columbia announced Wednesday that it acquired an Australian manufacturer of waterproofing and coatings systems for an undisclosed sum. Chemind Construction Products, a private research and manufacturing company based in Brisbane, Australia, brings waterproofing technology to Grace Construction Products division, which had $1 billion in sales last year. Chemind's waterproof coatings are used to protect commercial, residential and civil structures, the company said.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
The Baltimore Bombers, who are less than two weeks from their first season in the North American Lacrosse League, announced the appointment of Dan Marohl , Shawn Nadelen and Damien Davis as captains and assistant captains. Each player was chosen by teammates through an open election. The NALL is a professional box lacrosse league founded in 2011. Marohl is a native of Annapolis who attended St. Mary's and UMBC. He began his professional box lacrosse career with the Ottawa Rebel and the Philadelphia Wings of the National Lacrosse League.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2012
- It's pretty clear - Maryland has one tough kicker this season. Freshman Brad Craddock , who played Australian rules football, got rammed head-on by the ball carrier during the opening kickoff in Saturday's game and was credited with the tackle. On the next kickoff, Craddock met the same returner - Temple's Matt Brown - again. This time, Brown seemed to stiff-arm Craddock to the upper body before Brown was knocked down by Anthony Nixon at Temple's 45-yard line. Some kickers might shy away from contact, but not Craddock.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
Expect a big dose of Diggs when Maryland's football season opens Saturday at Byrd Stadium against William & Mary. Freshman Stefon Diggs, the highly-touted recruit, will be the punt returner and kick returner. He is also listed as a backup receiver, behind Kerry Boykins. He was lining up in the slot during practices and scrimmages. Maryland today released its new two-deep depth chart, announcing its starters for Saturday's game. While there was little mystery over many starting positions, here are three I was watching, and the outcomes: *Running back: Redshirt freshman Brandon Ross has supplanted Justus Pickett as the starting tailback.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | August 25, 2012
Colleges Australian lax player commits to Stevenson Callum Robinson , a 6-foot-4, 215-pound player from Western Australia, will join Stevenson for the 2013 season, according to the Lacrosse All Stars website. Robinson, 21, has primarily been playing at long-stick midfielder and is a member of the Australian squad preparing for the 2014 Federation of International Lacrosse World Championships in Commerce City, Colo. He also plays for the Wembley Lacrosse Club in the Western Australia State League.
TRAVEL
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | September 1, 2002
Tucked away in small-town Easton is a tiny inn that's poised to conquer the hearts (and stomachs) of food lovers in the mid-Atlantic. From a cozy kitchen in a 1790s red brick house, a New York native with an Australian obsession has been quietly offering up dishes that meld Down Under flavors with Chesapeake delights. Soft-shell crabs are served with a Vietnamese-inspired caramelized coconut jus infused with lemon grass. Australian "bay bugs" (slipper lobsters) are grilled and paired with a green papaya salad and yellow bean dipping sauce.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | February 20, 1995
Canberra, Australia. -- On Wednesday, the 53rd anniversary of the fall of Singapore to invading Japanese, the Australian government honored the 31,088 Australian men and women taken as prisoners of war during World War II. As the survivors gathered at the war memorial overlooking the city, police blocked buses carrying Japanese tourists.They were afraid of what might happen if the old ''diggers'' saw the children and grandchildren of their Japanese guards.Australian memory is enshrined in these numbers: 8,712 Aussies were captured by Germans during the war and 8,448 of them came home; 22,376 were captured by the Japanese and 8,031 of them died in captivity -- the greatest number of them from starvation and exhaustion building the jungle railroad in Burma and Thailand that Americans remember leading to the bridge over the River Kwai.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | August 20, 2012
Dew Tour Lasek takes second in shortened Skate Bowl Pedro Barros defended his championship in the rain-shortened Skate Bowl at the Dew Tour Pantech Beach Championships in Ocean City on Sunday, holding off Baltimore native Bucky Lasek . In the first-ever Mega 2.0 event, 12-year-old Tom Schaar threw down a front-side 180 melon over the gap and spun a 1080 out of the quarter-pipe to win with a score of 89.00. Second place was earned by New York native Elliot Sloan with a score of 87.00 by throwing a tail grab combo first with a 720 over the gap then with another in a 540 on the quarter pipe.
SPORTS
By Steven Petrella, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
When Denis Ryan arrived in Maryland in 1998, he was closing out a yearlong vacation that had beaten him down. He was nearing the end of a working holiday and sabbatical, something common among young adults in Australia. Ryan wanted to return home but felt that if he did, he would have given up his last opportunity to travel the world and see more of the United States. After getting a job in security at the local Australian Embassy, Ryan received a $2,000 grant to teach the sport he loved, Australian rules football, to schools in the area.
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