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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1997
As a send-up of '60s spy films, "Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery" is fitfully funny, particularly in an opening street scene that imagines "A Hard Day's Night" as the latest James Bond film, providing the movie with a peak it never approaches again.As played by Mike Myers (desperately trying to prove he can do something other than "Wayne's World"), Powers is the geekiest secret agent imaginable, and the joke is that women find him sexually irresistible.But when his nemesis, Dr. Evil (Myers again)
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By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2003
In the summer of 1996, life was good for Robert Florio. The 14-year-old had fallen for a girl with long, brown hair. He and his best friend, Jeff, talked of one day crisscrossing the country in a gutted school bus. And he dreamed of being a baseball player. Florio threw so hard his father bought a new mitt to play catch. Cal Ripken Jr. was his favorite slugger. The Orioles were his real love. But before the end of that summer, Florio lost his childhood in a swimming-pool accident. Tonight, he will take the field inside Oriole Park at Camden Yards, not as a player - as he once dreamed - but as a 21-year-old man who, despite severe limitations, will finally be able to feel the joy of being 14 again.
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BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
For days, Baltimore's advertising community has buzzed over the lawsuit that alleges a local pharmacy and advertising agency used a look-alike Austin Powers character in a local television spot.In advertising shops around Baltimore, at least some industry executives think the NeighborCare Pharmacies Inc. commercial may have pushed the boundaries of what's allowed. Others say it's creative, and doesn't cross the line.Conspiracy theories abound about who lies behind the lawsuit. And many wonder what it means to an industry that already receives a fair share of criticism.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 4, 2002
Has any other movie actor sustained a busy and diverse career as well as Michael Caine? Gene Hackman and Samuel L. Jackson must be the only other contenders. At age 69, Caine has made more than 130 major movie and TV appearances (not counting guest spots like his cameos on Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In). More important, he has managed to pull off the feat of becoming at once an identifiable star whose name alone evokes a Cockney cool and a versatile character actor. As he swings from the extremes of colorful surrogate-fatherhood in The Cider House Rules (1999)
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1999
We can't explain the shag-appeal of happily unhip British spy Austin Powers. But we're guessing it has something to do with the threads.Austin's clothes, an Oscar-Wilde-meets-George-Harrison spectrum of opulent velvets, natty Nehru jackets and neon-checked suits, truly make the international man of mystery."
FEATURES
By John M. Glionna and John M. Glionna,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 11, 1999
Mike Myers has this conflict over bacon.The 35-year-old Canadian, a comedian-turned-actor and creator of such well-observed characters as heavy-metal slacker Wayne Campbell, Dieter Sprockets the sexually confused West German talk-show host, and the swinging, snaggle-toothed British secret agent known as Austin Powers, knows the stuff is bad for him.Still, he can't help himself."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 26, 2002
New Line Cinema has asked journalists not to reveal the slew of guest-star appearances that crop up in Austin Powers in Goldmember. I say that's not cricket. Around the World in 80 Days and The List of Adrian Messenger - movies I'm sure Mike Myers and his alter ego Austin Powers have seen - advertised their big-name cameos and made spotting them a game akin to Saturday Night Live's old "Find the Popes in the Pizza" contest. To keep the critical peace, let's just say that the guest stars supply most of the fresh laughs in the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 4, 2002
Has any other movie actor sustained a busy and diverse career as well as Michael Caine? Gene Hackman and Samuel L. Jackson must be the only other contenders. At age 69, Caine has made more than 130 major movie and TV appearances (not counting guest spots like his cameos on Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In). More important, he has managed to pull off the feat of becoming at once an identifiable star whose name alone evokes a Cockney cool and a versatile character actor. As he swings from the extremes of colorful surrogate-fatherhood in The Cider House Rules (1999)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 11, 1999
When "Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery" was released on May 2, 1997, no bells went off. No whistles blew. No puffs of annunciating smoke came from the nation's theaters proclaiming it the unlikeliest hit of the year.But throughout that summer, the goofy, retro comedy developed a following, earning a respectable $54 million at the box office. Then it was released on video.That's when the puffs of smoke went up.What started as a cultish sleeper hit turned into a juggernaut, outselling every video of the year and generating a phenomenal amount of repeat rentals.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 11, 1999
Has Austin Powers sold out?"Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me" is so full of product placements, and so calculated to appeal to the young audience that made the first "Austin Powers" movie such a hit, that it looks like the little-movie-that-could of 1997 has blossomed into a big, bad franchise.Luckily, the franchise is a winning one, at least so far. And Mike Myers, the author of the "Austin Powers" concept and the protean actor behind the story's two main characters, provides such a genial sense of good fun that even the crassest elements of "The Spy Who Shagged Me" come off as sneakily cheeky.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 26, 2002
New Line Cinema has asked journalists not to reveal the slew of guest-star appearances that crop up in Austin Powers in Goldmember. I say that's not cricket. Around the World in 80 Days and The List of Adrian Messenger - movies I'm sure Mike Myers and his alter ego Austin Powers have seen - advertised their big-name cameos and made spotting them a game akin to Saturday Night Live's old "Find the Popes in the Pizza" contest. To keep the critical peace, let's just say that the guest stars supply most of the fresh laughs in the movie.
FEATURES
By JOE MATHEWS and JOE MATHEWS,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2000
Marc Singer steps out of a cab at 151 W. 25th St. and takes the elevator up to the third floor. Opening the steel door to the offices of togglethis, his Internet start-up, he eyes three mannequins from the shop next door that stand in the hallway, naked to the world. "I know how they feel," he says. It is late summer 1999, and with the success of its first interactive character, Bozlo Beaver, togglethis has stepped into the public spotlight. There is no longer time to play with Legos on the conference room table or the five Mr. Potato Heads, dressed as the disco group the Village People.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | October 24, 1999
What are you gonna be? Now that question's harmless. It's the follow-ups that get a bit scary: Where are you gonna buy that costume? How are you gonna pay for it? And when will you find the time to put it together? Accept your home as a costume shop waiting to happen, and the answers may be easier than you think. Commit yourself to plundering it for all the buried possibilities it holds, and you may find a new Halloween look is as close as your own closet ... and has been for years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | August 15, 1999
For a brief moment this summer, Baltimore filmgoers may have thought they were seeing things. The Charles Theatre, the venerable art house that had recently added four screens, was playing such big studio movies as "Summer of Sam," "South Park: Bigger, Longer and Uncut" and "Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me."Meanwhile, the 17-screen General Cinema megaplex in Owings Mills was showing "Limbo," the latest low-budget feature from independent filmmaker John Sayles.Was there something wrong with this picture?
NEWS
By Stephen Lynch and Stephen Lynch,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | July 28, 1999
BUDAPEST, Hungary -- The soundtrack is here. The novel, too. Even breakfast cereals with the appetizing face of Darth Maul on the box. But for most Europeans, "Star Wars" is the phantom presence.Under the vagaries of international film distribution, "The Phantom Menace" opened this month in Britain, nearly two months after its U.S. premiere and six weeks after opening in Australia. Next month, it will reach Germany and France. And finally, about the time it vanishes from screens in the United States, it comes here, to Eastern Europe.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1999
We can't explain the shag-appeal of happily unhip British spy Austin Powers. But we're guessing it has something to do with the threads.Austin's clothes, an Oscar-Wilde-meets-George-Harrison spectrum of opulent velvets, natty Nehru jackets and neon-checked suits, truly make the international man of mystery."
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1998
For the second Friday in a row, employees were laid off yesterday at Trahan, Burden & Charles Inc., bringing to seven the people who have been let go since the agency lost its $30 million account with Micron Electronics Inc.Four employees were dismissed on Feb. 27 and three yesterday, according to Sandra S. Hillman, executive vice president. Another two employees have resigned from the advertising and public relations firm to take other jobs, she said.The layoffs are the first in the company's 24-year history, Hillman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | August 15, 1999
For a brief moment this summer, Baltimore filmgoers may have thought they were seeing things. The Charles Theatre, the venerable art house that had recently added four screens, was playing such big studio movies as "Summer of Sam," "South Park: Bigger, Longer and Uncut" and "Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me."Meanwhile, the 17-screen General Cinema megaplex in Owings Mills was showing "Limbo," the latest low-budget feature from independent filmmaker John Sayles.Was there something wrong with this picture?
FEATURES
By John M. Glionna and John M. Glionna,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 11, 1999
Mike Myers has this conflict over bacon.The 35-year-old Canadian, a comedian-turned-actor and creator of such well-observed characters as heavy-metal slacker Wayne Campbell, Dieter Sprockets the sexually confused West German talk-show host, and the swinging, snaggle-toothed British secret agent known as Austin Powers, knows the stuff is bad for him.Still, he can't help himself."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 11, 1999
When "Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery" was released on May 2, 1997, no bells went off. No whistles blew. No puffs of annunciating smoke came from the nation's theaters proclaiming it the unlikeliest hit of the year.But throughout that summer, the goofy, retro comedy developed a following, earning a respectable $54 million at the box office. Then it was released on video.That's when the puffs of smoke went up.What started as a cultish sleeper hit turned into a juggernaut, outselling every video of the year and generating a phenomenal amount of repeat rentals.
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