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Auld Lang Syne

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By FRED RASMUSSEN | December 27, 1992
Please send old photos of parades or events held by fraternal lodges such as Masons and Elks, within the next two weeks, to Way Back When, Sun Magazine, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21278. You must include caption information and your daytime phone number. Also, enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope if you'd like your photos returned. If your photo is your only copy, please send a good-quality duplicate, not the original.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2004
Sometime during the late 1960s, while making a cameo appearance on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, bandleader Guy Lombardo - who was known as "Mr. New Year's Eve" - stared into the camera and said, "When I die, I'm taking New Year's Eve with me." Well, almost. Even though Dick Clark replaced Lombardo with his New Year's Eve broadcasts, people still think of the great bandleader as the old year yields to the new. And more than likely on New Year's Eve, you heard a recording of Lombardo and his Royal Canadians playing their signature vibrato saxophone rendition of "Auld Lang Syne" at the stroke of midnight.
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By Stephen Lynch and Stephen Lynch,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | December 31, 1999
Depending on where you celebrate New Year's Eve, the turntables will spin Prince's "1999," Barry Manilow's "It's Just Another New Year's Eve," or even, heaven forbid, Will Smith's "Will 2K."But at midnight, in almost every nightclub and home, on every television and radio, the song will be the same: "Auld Lang Syne.""It just fits the moment," says Tyrone Traher, who has studied the origins of the song. "It's traditional. Kind of like how `Amazing Grace' is always played at a funeral."Except most people can make it past the first line of "Amazing Grace."
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By Stephen Lynch and Stephen Lynch,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | December 31, 1999
Depending on where you celebrate New Year's Eve, the turntables will spin Prince's "1999," Barry Manilow's "It's Just Another New Year's Eve," or even, heaven forbid, Will Smith's "Will 2K."But at midnight, in almost every nightclub and home, on every television and radio, the song will be the same: "Auld Lang Syne.""It just fits the moment," says Tyrone Traher, who has studied the origins of the song. "It's traditional. Kind of like how `Amazing Grace' is always played at a funeral."Except most people can make it past the first line of "Amazing Grace."
NEWS
By Diane Jacobs | December 31, 1991
Lift the glassA year goes by . . .A snowflake in the winter sky! A crystal memory.Amidst the taffeta and lace,the smell of pine` the Christmas faceAdjust the angel on the treeFamiliar is the mystery.The richness of the baritone,1% impassioned of the Auld Lang SyneTo celebrate a note in timeSing togetherShare the art of chronicles that gild the heart.However cold the passing year,Tradition in the candlelight3' burns deeper than the wistful tear.Wreathe the nightFestoon the dayGather moments as they strayLife the glassA year goes by . . ..` A snowflake in the winter sky.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2004
Sometime during the late 1960s, while making a cameo appearance on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, bandleader Guy Lombardo - who was known as "Mr. New Year's Eve" - stared into the camera and said, "When I die, I'm taking New Year's Eve with me." Well, almost. Even though Dick Clark replaced Lombardo with his New Year's Eve broadcasts, people still think of the great bandleader as the old year yields to the new. And more than likely on New Year's Eve, you heard a recording of Lombardo and his Royal Canadians playing their signature vibrato saxophone rendition of "Auld Lang Syne" at the stroke of midnight.
SPORTS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Contributing Writer | December 5, 1999
The Golden Age of Sports is now. Enjoy its magic, but remember that it was built on the strength, talent and courage of a multitude of 20th century athletes, some great and some less than great, but all leaving their mark in the story of the 1900s.The images flow in these pages. There is Jesse Owens, son of an Alabama sharecropper, saluting his flag after winning four gold medals in the 1936 Berlin Olympics while Hitler and his Brownshirts looked on in dismay.There is the stricken Lou Gehrig's farewell speech to an emotional crowd in Yankee Stadium.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | December 3, 1993
When a story lumps Thomas Jefferson, Renaissance madrigals, a world-renowned master illusionist, African drumming, Irish folk songs, ice dancing and Russian choral music together in the same paragraph, it can only mean one thing: First Night is back.For the fourth straight New Year's Eve, downtown Annapolis, from the West Street corridor to St. John's College to the City Dock, will play host to a diverse, family-oriented, nonalcoholic celebration of the arts to usher in the new year.As in the past, a single $8 button ($12 if purchased after Dec. 15)
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun Reporter | January 6, 2007
It was not the typical New Year's Eve bash. The ad promised the chance to dance the day away, and the revelers did, clapping and swinging their hips. They burst into "Auld Lang Syne" at noon. And the celebration occurred five days into the new year. Welcome to the Procrastinator's New Year's Eve Party at the Essex Senior Center. Most of the people shimmying to "Roll out the Barrel" yesterday were asleep at midnight on New Year's Eve. But catch them on a Friday afternoon, and it is a different story: They know how to party.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | November 5, 2011
COLLEGE PARK — At one point during the Terrapins' ugly 28-13 loss to Virginia yesterday, the Maryland band struck up "Auld Lang Syne. " It was a final mournful salute to Maryland's seniors, playing their last game at Byrd Stadium. But maybe it was a subconscious wish for this nightmare of a season to be gone, too. Oh, has this been a tough year for Randy Edsall and his players. Is it too early to refer to Edsall as "embattled?" Just nine games into his first season at College Park?
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By Fred Rasmussen | January 1, 1995
Within the next week, please send old photos of people cleaning snow off cars to Sun Magazine, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21278. You must include caption information and your daytime phone number. Also, enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope if you'd like your photo returned. If your photo is your only copy, please send a good-quality duplicate, not the original. No faxes or newspaper clippings, please.
NEWS
By Diane Jacobs | December 31, 1991
Lift the glassA year goes by . . .A snowflake in the winter sky! A crystal memory.Amidst the taffeta and lace,the smell of pine` the Christmas faceAdjust the angel on the treeFamiliar is the mystery.The richness of the baritone,1% impassioned of the Auld Lang SyneTo celebrate a note in timeSing togetherShare the art of chronicles that gild the heart.However cold the passing year,Tradition in the candlelight3' burns deeper than the wistful tear.Wreathe the nightFestoon the dayGather moments as they strayLife the glassA year goes by . . ..` A snowflake in the winter sky.
NEWS
December 23, 2001
If you have found yourself absent-mindedly humming bits of "White Christmas" these last days, you are perfectly in tune with the times. The song, written by Irving Berlin, is the most-recorded holiday song of the past hundred years, according to the American Society of Composers, Authors and Performers. "White Christmas" was first sung in the film Holiday Inn in 1942 by Marjorie Reynolds and Bing Crosby (right). Berlin won an Academy Award for Best Song, and since then there have been 500 versions recorded in dozens of languages.
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