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Auguste Rodin

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By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 2007
Rebecca Bafford has been working for more than a year to bring a traveling exhibition of art by Auguste Rodin to Howard Community College, but when workers rolled the first bronze sculpture into the college's arts center last week, she said she stopped in her tracks at the sight of it. "I think it is going to hit a lot of people with the intensity that it did for me," said Bafford, director of the college's art gallery. "It is a powerful reminder of what sculpture can do." The exhibition of 35 of the famous French artist's bronze sculptures, which belong to the California-based Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, is the type of museum-quality show the college was envisioning when it built the Peter & Elizabeth Horowitz Visual and Performing Arts Center in 2006.
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TRAVEL
By Jake Fewster, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
Philadelphia Reopening of Rodin Museum After undergoing a three-year renovation, Philadelphia's Rodin Museum will once again be open to the public. The museum features some of the greatest works by the French sculptor, Auguste Rodin, including "The Burghers of Calais" and "The Gates of Hell" — a monumental piece inspired by Dante's "Inferno. " The museum reopens Friday, July 13. Admission is a suggested contribution of $5 per guest. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday.
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FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 24, 1990
''Camille Claudel,'' showing at the Charles, is the story of Claudel's very long descent into madness. The film, two and one-half hours long, should run no more than 90 minutes, but director Bruno Nuyten apparently wanted us to share in all this agony, which we do.Claudel, who lived from 1864 to 1943, was collaborator then mistress to Auguste Rodin, the French sculptor. He already had a family, but that didn't deter Claudel who, when Rodin refused to leave his wife and children, began her ride to hell.
HEALTH
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
When Johns Hopkins Hospital officially opens its new, $1.1 billion building Tuesday, sick children will find a cobalt cow with legs the color of grass and a butter-colored head floating above their heads, poised to jump over a fanciful "moon. " The new hospital won't just provide state-of-the-art health care. It will also provide state-of-the-art art. The 500 original paintings, sculptures and murals, created by more than 70 artists from around the U.S., are on display throughout both the children and adult towers in the new facility.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | June 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The whirlwind of euphoria that marked the landing of military helicopters here for last weekend's Desert Storm victory celebration had more of an impact than some people thought.A storm of flying footpath gravel created by hovering military helicopters damaged some of the 50 bronze sculptures in the Sculpture Gardens at Hirshhorn Museum on the Capitol Mall.Museum workers, who quickly cleaned off the sculptures and wrapped them in blankets to protect them from further possible damage, met yesterday to inventory the damage and tally the repair costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JENNIFER CHOI | January 24, 2008
FROG FUN Waxy monkey frogs, fire-bellied toads and their exotic cousins leap into the National Geographic Museum tomorrow. The venue will host Frogs -- A Chorus of Colors through May 11. The exhibit lets audiences view various frog species -- including poison dart frogs, African bullfrogs, Chinese gliding frogs and horned frogs -- in environments that replicate their natural habitats, learn about their anatomy and history and their environmental roles....
TRAVEL
By Jake Fewster, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
Philadelphia Reopening of Rodin Museum After undergoing a three-year renovation, Philadelphia's Rodin Museum will once again be open to the public. The museum features some of the greatest works by the French sculptor, Auguste Rodin, including "The Burghers of Calais" and "The Gates of Hell" — a monumental piece inspired by Dante's "Inferno. " The museum reopens Friday, July 13. Admission is a suggested contribution of $5 per guest. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday.
HEALTH
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
When Johns Hopkins Hospital officially opens its new, $1.1 billion building Tuesday, sick children will find a cobalt cow with legs the color of grass and a butter-colored head floating above their heads, poised to jump over a fanciful "moon. " The new hospital won't just provide state-of-the-art health care. It will also provide state-of-the-art art. The 500 original paintings, sculptures and murals, created by more than 70 artists from around the U.S., are on display throughout both the children and adult towers in the new facility.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | August 1, 2007
With his massive head resting on one hand, Auguste Rodin's The Thinker is perhaps the most instantly recognizable sculpture in the world, a 2-ton bronze behemoth cast in the shape of a nude man lost in solitary contemplation. It's a work that has bemused viewers the world over since its first public appearance in 1904. Now his unforgettable image is the centerpiece of Rodin: Expression & Influence, a modestly scaled but richly rewarding exhibition that opens today at the Baltimore Museum of Art. The show presents nearly 30 works by the French master and such contemporaries as Edgar Degas, Charles Despiau, Pablo Picasso and Aristide Maillol.
NEWS
February 6, 1995
Thomas Hayward, 77, a leading tenor at the Metropolitan Opera during the 1940s and 1950s, died of kidney and heart problems Thursday at his home in Las Vegas. As a lyric tenor, he sang with the Met for 14 years and had leading roles in "La Traviata," "Rigoletto" and "Faust." He had more than 400 concert performances with major symphony orchestras in North America. He also starred in a long-running NBC radio show, "Serenade to America."Albert Elsen, 67, a Stanford University art professor and expert on sculptor Auguste Rodin, died Thursday of a heart attack in Stanford, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JENNIFER CHOI | January 24, 2008
FROG FUN Waxy monkey frogs, fire-bellied toads and their exotic cousins leap into the National Geographic Museum tomorrow. The venue will host Frogs -- A Chorus of Colors through May 11. The exhibit lets audiences view various frog species -- including poison dart frogs, African bullfrogs, Chinese gliding frogs and horned frogs -- in environments that replicate their natural habitats, learn about their anatomy and history and their environmental roles....
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 2007
Rebecca Bafford has been working for more than a year to bring a traveling exhibition of art by Auguste Rodin to Howard Community College, but when workers rolled the first bronze sculpture into the college's arts center last week, she said she stopped in her tracks at the sight of it. "I think it is going to hit a lot of people with the intensity that it did for me," said Bafford, director of the college's art gallery. "It is a powerful reminder of what sculpture can do." The exhibition of 35 of the famous French artist's bronze sculptures, which belong to the California-based Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, is the type of museum-quality show the college was envisioning when it built the Peter & Elizabeth Horowitz Visual and Performing Arts Center in 2006.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | June 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The whirlwind of euphoria that marked the landing of military helicopters here for last weekend's Desert Storm victory celebration had more of an impact than some people thought.A storm of flying footpath gravel created by hovering military helicopters damaged some of the 50 bronze sculptures in the Sculpture Gardens at Hirshhorn Museum on the Capitol Mall.Museum workers, who quickly cleaned off the sculptures and wrapped them in blankets to protect them from further possible damage, met yesterday to inventory the damage and tally the repair costs.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 24, 1990
''Camille Claudel,'' showing at the Charles, is the story of Claudel's very long descent into madness. The film, two and one-half hours long, should run no more than 90 minutes, but director Bruno Nuyten apparently wanted us to share in all this agony, which we do.Claudel, who lived from 1864 to 1943, was collaborator then mistress to Auguste Rodin, the French sculptor. He already had a family, but that didn't deter Claudel who, when Rodin refused to leave his wife and children, began her ride to hell.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 1, 2003
Alfred Stieglitz, the embattled genius who practically single-handedly dragged photography into the 20th century, was a tireless writer, publisher and gallery owner as well as a gifted photographer in his own right. Stieglitz wrote or edited hundreds of articles championing the artists he admired -- from photographers Edward Steichen and Paul Strand to painters Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse to sculptor Auguste Rodin. Much of his criticism appeared in Camera Work, the little magazine he established in 1903 to promote his avant-garde ideas and which he continued to publish until 1917.
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