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SPORTS
April 7, 2011
W here: Augusta National Golf Club, Augusta, Ga. TV: Thursday-Friday, 4-7 p.m. (ESPN); highlights 11:30-11:45 p.m. (CBS). Saturday, 3:30-7 p.m. (CBS). Sunday, 2-7 p.m. (CBS). Course facts: 7,435 yards, par 72. The 1933 Bobby Jones/Alistair Mackenzie design finally has stabilized since its expansion period of the last decade, allowing both players and club officials to understand the nuances of the layout. Format: 72 holes, stroke play. Field cut after 36 holes to top 44 and ties, plus all within 10 strokes of the lead.
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NEWS
April 6, 2012
The Masters golf tournament, held annually at the Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia, is on a collision course with reality. Here's the dilemma: The tradition-rich club is, and always has been, a men-only venue. One of their three main sponsors, IBM, has a female CEO, Virginia Rometty. This is the part where it gets a bit sticky. The four previous CEOs of IBM, all obviously males, held memberships at the club. To add a bit of fuel to the mix was Augusta National's Chairman Billy Payne's deflection of questions posed to him about the club's stodgy, antiquated rules of admission.
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NEWS
April 6, 2012
The Masters golf tournament, held annually at the Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia, is on a collision course with reality. Here's the dilemma: The tradition-rich club is, and always has been, a men-only venue. One of their three main sponsors, IBM, has a female CEO, Virginia Rometty. This is the part where it gets a bit sticky. The four previous CEOs of IBM, all obviously males, held memberships at the club. To add a bit of fuel to the mix was Augusta National's Chairman Billy Payne's deflection of questions posed to him about the club's stodgy, antiquated rules of admission.
SPORTS
April 7, 2011
W here: Augusta National Golf Club, Augusta, Ga. TV: Thursday-Friday, 4-7 p.m. (ESPN); highlights 11:30-11:45 p.m. (CBS). Saturday, 3:30-7 p.m. (CBS). Sunday, 2-7 p.m. (CBS). Course facts: 7,435 yards, par 72. The 1933 Bobby Jones/Alistair Mackenzie design finally has stabilized since its expansion period of the last decade, allowing both players and club officials to understand the nuances of the layout. Format: 72 holes, stroke play. Field cut after 36 holes to top 44 and ties, plus all within 10 strokes of the lead.
SPORTS
April 10, 2005
Leader board Golfer Total Through Chris DiMarco 13-under 9 holes Tiger Woods 9-under 9 holes Thomas Bjorn 8-under 9 holes Rod Pampling 4-under 12 holes Vijay Singh 4-under 10 holes Mark Hensby 4-under 9 holes Note: The incomplete third round is scheduled to resume at 8 a.m. today. Round 4 is expected to start at about 11 a.m.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | April 10, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - It was the longest of days at Augusta National. Play began at 8:30 a.m., and ended some 11 hours later as the sunlight finally gave out. Tiger Woods wished it could have gone on and on. He played 26 holes as the rain-delayed Masters went into catch-up mode on Day 3, and he completed those 26 holes in 11-under-par, rising from nowhere to second on the leader board, behind only Chris DiMarco. Woods still trails by four strokes, but if his Sunday is anything like his Saturday, he's going to win his fourth Masters.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | April 7, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Tiger Woods was taking questions in the Masters media room Tuesday afternoon when a reporter asked him to play word association and said, simply, "Vijay." So, what instantly came to Woods' mind when he heard the name of the world's top-ranked golfer, Vijay Singh? "Mm-hmm," Woods said. The interview moderator raised an eyebrow, looked at Woods and said, "Mm-hmm, that's your only response?" Stumbling to recover, Woods said, "He's good." Nervous laughter filled the room as the moderator said, "Well, that had potential."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Considering the way it looked around here yesterday morning, it's amazing that any golf was played in the opening round of the 69th Masters. More than an inch of rain fell, lightning struck and everyone waited. For 5 1/2 hours. While some seemed unfazed by the delay, many might have been hoping for a complete washout. Chris DiMarco, who has contended here two of the past four years, was at 4-under through 14 holes. Mark Hensby of Australia, one of only 24 players to finish, was at 3-under par 69. Englishman Luke Donald was also at 3-under, through 14. Play was called last night at 7:23 with 68 players still on the course.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - A year ago, Chris DiMarco went to bed after the third round of the Masters sharing the lead with Phil Mickelson going into Sunday at Augusta National. About the most memorable thing DiMarco did in the final round was to give Mickelson a great read on what turned out to be his winning putt. "I learned, I watched how it was done," DiMarco, who shot 4-over-par 76 and faded to a tie for sixth, recalled last night. "If anybody had sat back and had the best seat in the house, it was me. [Mickelson]
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Fred Funk wasn't even off the course during the final round of The Players Championship when the e-mails and phone messages started pouring in to his nearby home in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. "I had one friend call saying, `I know you're not finished yet, but keep up the good work,'" Funk recalled yesterday, as he practiced chip shots at Augusta National in preparation for today's opening round of the 69th Masters. Funk kept it up and, after three-putting away a two-shot lead, made a 5-foot par putt on the final hole to win by a stroke over England's Luke Donald on March 28. When Funk's seventh PGA Tour victory was secured, the messages kept coming.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - A year ago, Chris DiMarco went to bed after the third round of the Masters sharing the lead with Phil Mickelson going into Sunday at Augusta National. About the most memorable thing DiMarco did in the final round was to give Mickelson a great read on what turned out to be his winning putt. "I learned, I watched how it was done," DiMarco, who shot 4-over-par 76 and faded to a tie for sixth, recalled last night. "If anybody had sat back and had the best seat in the house, it was me. [Mickelson]
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | April 10, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - It was the longest of days at Augusta National. Play began at 8:30 a.m., and ended some 11 hours later as the sunlight finally gave out. Tiger Woods wished it could have gone on and on. He played 26 holes as the rain-delayed Masters went into catch-up mode on Day 3, and he completed those 26 holes in 11-under-par, rising from nowhere to second on the leader board, behind only Chris DiMarco. Woods still trails by four strokes, but if his Sunday is anything like his Saturday, he's going to win his fourth Masters.
SPORTS
April 10, 2005
Leader board Golfer Total Through Chris DiMarco 13-under 9 holes Tiger Woods 9-under 9 holes Thomas Bjorn 8-under 9 holes Rod Pampling 4-under 12 holes Vijay Singh 4-under 10 holes Mark Hensby 4-under 9 holes Note: The incomplete third round is scheduled to resume at 8 a.m. today. Round 4 is expected to start at about 11 a.m.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Considering the way it looked around here yesterday morning, it's amazing that any golf was played in the opening round of the 69th Masters. More than an inch of rain fell, lightning struck and everyone waited. For 5 1/2 hours. While some seemed unfazed by the delay, many might have been hoping for a complete washout. Chris DiMarco, who has contended here two of the past four years, was at 4-under through 14 holes. Mark Hensby of Australia, one of only 24 players to finish, was at 3-under par 69. Englishman Luke Donald was also at 3-under, through 14. Play was called last night at 7:23 with 68 players still on the course.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | April 7, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Tiger Woods was taking questions in the Masters media room Tuesday afternoon when a reporter asked him to play word association and said, simply, "Vijay." So, what instantly came to Woods' mind when he heard the name of the world's top-ranked golfer, Vijay Singh? "Mm-hmm," Woods said. The interview moderator raised an eyebrow, looked at Woods and said, "Mm-hmm, that's your only response?" Stumbling to recover, Woods said, "He's good." Nervous laughter filled the room as the moderator said, "Well, that had potential."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Fred Funk wasn't even off the course during the final round of The Players Championship when the e-mails and phone messages started pouring in to his nearby home in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. "I had one friend call saying, `I know you're not finished yet, but keep up the good work,'" Funk recalled yesterday, as he practiced chip shots at Augusta National in preparation for today's opening round of the 69th Masters. Funk kept it up and, after three-putting away a two-shot lead, made a 5-foot par putt on the final hole to win by a stroke over England's Luke Donald on March 28. When Funk's seventh PGA Tour victory was secured, the messages kept coming.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | April 6, 1994
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Standing in awe of Augusta National Golf Club and its intrinsic splendor, while waiting in anticipation of another Masters Championship, gives reason to pause and consider what this green and glorious venue may have looked like a half-century ago during the perilous days of World War II.Augusta National, as with the rest of America, underwent emergency change. It shut down. Totally. Well, almost.In 1942, only four months after the start of the war, the course was closed for the duration.
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