Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAugusta National Golf
IN THE NEWS

Augusta National Golf

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By John Steadman | April 6, 1994
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Standing in awe of Augusta National Golf Club and its intrinsic splendor, while waiting in anticipation of another Masters Championship, gives reason to pause and consider what this green and glorious venue may have looked like a half-century ago during the perilous days of World War II.Augusta National, as with the rest of America, underwent emergency change. It shut down. Totally. Well, almost.In 1942, only four months after the start of the war, the course was closed for the duration.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Reporter | April 8, 2007
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Will Ferrell was in the gallery at Augusta National Golf Club yesterday during the third round of the 71st Masters, hanging out with the entourage of family, friends and thousands of fans of four-time champion Tiger Woods. After Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby and the more recent Blades of Glory, Ferrell might be considering filming a few scenes here for the possible conclusion to what would be a trilogy of sports epics. Coming to a theater near you: Green Jacket Blues.
Advertisement
SPORTS
April 10, 2005
Leader board Golfer Total Through Chris DiMarco 13-under 9 holes Tiger Woods 9-under 9 holes Thomas Bjorn 8-under 9 holes Rod Pampling 4-under 12 holes Vijay Singh 4-under 10 holes Mark Hensby 4-under 9 holes Note: The incomplete third round is scheduled to resume at 8 a.m. today. Round 4 is expected to start at about 11 a.m.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 4, 2006
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- On a simple white board with Masters-green letters, just an easy stroll from the Augusta National Golf Club entrance, the names of champions and contenders began to appear. Tiger Woods and Mark O'Meara, the 1998 champion, were practicing with the Masters rookie Sean O'Hair. Ernie Els and Sergio Garcia were taking their swipes together. David Duval was playing alone. It was the first day of work at the 70th Masters, which begins Thursday, and the golfers were trying to psych themselves up for the 7,445-yard test.
SPORTS
November 19, 2005
"You know, as a NASCAR driver I'm a little afraid of that Dead Man's Corner." Darrell Waltrip Auto racing veteran, who was headed to Augusta National Golf Club
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Reporter | April 8, 2007
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Will Ferrell was in the gallery at Augusta National Golf Club yesterday during the third round of the 71st Masters, hanging out with the entourage of family, friends and thousands of fans of four-time champion Tiger Woods. After Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby and the more recent Blades of Glory, Ferrell might be considering filming a few scenes here for the possible conclusion to what would be a trilogy of sports epics. Coming to a theater near you: Green Jacket Blues.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 4, 2006
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- On a simple white board with Masters-green letters, just an easy stroll from the Augusta National Golf Club entrance, the names of champions and contenders began to appear. Tiger Woods and Mark O'Meara, the 1998 champion, were practicing with the Masters rookie Sean O'Hair. Ernie Els and Sergio Garcia were taking their swipes together. David Duval was playing alone. It was the first day of work at the 70th Masters, which begins Thursday, and the golfers were trying to psych themselves up for the 7,445-yard test.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1996
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- The cinematic references have become a wee bit more flattering to Colin Montgomerie.Europe's premier golfer over the past four years was asked yesterday if he felt that the Oscar success of "Braveheart," the tale of a Scottish hero of an earlier age, was an omen for him at the Masters. It's a dramatic change from last year, when he was likened to another movie character with an accent from across the pond: Mrs. Doubtfire.If Montgomerie used to resemble Robin Williams in drag, now his muscle tone is closer to Mel Gibson's.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | January 18, 1991
Sports are a grand and glorious choreography of fun and games. War, dirty and violent, is life and death. There can never be a correlation.Football, basketball, hockey and other frivolous professional athletic pursuits should be halted. America needs to dwell on the solemnity and seriousness of what its valiant young men and women are being asked to do during these terrifying moments in history.The supreme sacrifice will too often be the end result on the scoreboard. Profound consideration must be shown to the fresh faces, these fighters for freedom who are endeavoring to stamp out a despot who trampled a tiny nation.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | April 7, 1994
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Like the dogwoods and azaleas, Greg Norman comes back to Augusta National Golf Club each spring. Looking for perfection. Looking for fulfillment. Looking for that famous green jacket. Looking to win the Masters.But each year since 1981, Norman has left with only the memory of another empty Masters; of poor opening rounds, which have hampered him throughout his career here; of Larry Mize's 140-foot chip-in in sudden death seven years ago, which haunted him for a long time.When Norman tees off today in the 58th Masters, he will do so as the favorite.
SPORTS
November 19, 2005
"You know, as a NASCAR driver I'm a little afraid of that Dead Man's Corner." Darrell Waltrip Auto racing veteran, who was headed to Augusta National Golf Club
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | April 10, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - It was the longest of days at Augusta National. Play began at 8:30 a.m., and ended some 11 hours later as the sunlight finally gave out. Tiger Woods wished it could have gone on and on. He played 26 holes as the rain-delayed Masters went into catch-up mode on Day 3, and he completed those 26 holes in 11-under-par, rising from nowhere to second on the leader board, behind only Chris DiMarco. Woods still trails by four strokes, but if his Sunday is anything like his Saturday, he's going to win his fourth Masters.
SPORTS
April 10, 2005
Leader board Golfer Total Through Chris DiMarco 13-under 9 holes Tiger Woods 9-under 9 holes Thomas Bjorn 8-under 9 holes Rod Pampling 4-under 12 holes Vijay Singh 4-under 10 holes Mark Hensby 4-under 9 holes Note: The incomplete third round is scheduled to resume at 8 a.m. today. Round 4 is expected to start at about 11 a.m.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - A year ago, Chris DiMarco went to bed after the third round of the Masters sharing the lead with Phil Mickelson going into Sunday at Augusta National. About the most memorable thing DiMarco did in the final round was to give Mickelson a great read on what turned out to be his winning putt. "I learned, I watched how it was done," DiMarco, who shot 4-over-par 76 and faded to a tie for sixth, recalled last night. "If anybody had sat back and had the best seat in the house, it was me. [Mickelson]
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Considering the way it looked around here yesterday morning, it's amazing that any golf was played in the opening round of the 69th Masters. More than an inch of rain fell, lightning struck and everyone waited. For 5 1/2 hours. While some seemed unfazed by the delay, many might have been hoping for a complete washout. Chris DiMarco, who has contended here two of the past four years, was at 4-under through 14 holes. Mark Hensby of Australia, one of only 24 players to finish, was at 3-under par 69. Englishman Luke Donald was also at 3-under, through 14. Play was called last night at 7:23 with 68 players still on the course.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | April 7, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Tiger Woods was taking questions in the Masters media room Tuesday afternoon when a reporter asked him to play word association and said, simply, "Vijay." So, what instantly came to Woods' mind when he heard the name of the world's top-ranked golfer, Vijay Singh? "Mm-hmm," Woods said. The interview moderator raised an eyebrow, looked at Woods and said, "Mm-hmm, that's your only response?" Stumbling to recover, Woods said, "He's good." Nervous laughter filled the room as the moderator said, "Well, that had potential."
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2003
THE PROBLEM with letting women into your golf club, of course, is that invariably it leads to baby-changing tables in the locker rooms and blush wine with the pulled-pork barbecue and members yakking about window treatments instead of about stiffing a 4-iron from 200 yards. Hootie Johnson, the chairman of the all-male Augusta National Golf Club, understands all this. So when the Masters golf tournament begins today, Hootie and the other rich guys who run golf's most illustrious tournament will welcome fans of both genders - at least if they`ve coughed up $125 for a four-day pass.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | April 9, 1999
The television listings will say that CBS is carrying a golf tournament this weekend, but make no mistake: This year's Masters, just like every year's, looks more like a gymnastics meet. That's thanks to all the contortions and bends, verbal and otherwise, that CBS officials and announcers have to do to stay on the good side of the courtly Southern gentlemen who run the Augusta National golf course as if it were the '90s. The 1790s, that is. Consider, for instance, the vaults over reality that CBS anchor Jim Nantz and golf coordinating producer Lance Barrow did the other day during the annual pre-Masters conference call.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Fred Funk wasn't even off the course during the final round of The Players Championship when the e-mails and phone messages started pouring in to his nearby home in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. "I had one friend call saying, `I know you're not finished yet, but keep up the good work,'" Funk recalled yesterday, as he practiced chip shots at Augusta National in preparation for today's opening round of the 69th Masters. Funk kept it up and, after three-putting away a two-shot lead, made a 5-foot par putt on the final hole to win by a stroke over England's Luke Donald on March 28. When Funk's seventh PGA Tour victory was secured, the messages kept coming.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.