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By Lori Sears | February 27, 2003
John James Audubon's birds will be nesting at the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts in Hagerstown Saturday through April 27. Or more specifically, reproductions of 50 of his most historically important ornithological paintings will be on view at the museum. The exhibit, Audubon's Fifty Best, features facsimile editions of his original works, using the highest resolution digital imaging technology available. Many prints are from Audubon's original engravings from The Birds of America volumes.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
Nearly $2 million in federal grants have been awarded to protect and restore wetlands on the Eastern Shore, including a portion to enhance wildlife habitat on a 950-acre former bird sanctuary whose owner just donated the development rights to the state. The two Maryland projects announced Tuesday by Interior Secretary Ken Salazar were part of $20.5 million in grants handed out in 13 states. Point Pleasant Farm, a former National Audubon Society sanctuary at the mouth of the Choptank River, was selected to receive a $1 million grant.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 3, 1993
In America, the name of Audubon is probably as well known as those of Michelangelo, Rembrandt, van Gogh and Picasso -- maybe better known.Yet it's a safe bet that not a hundredth or even a thousandth of those who know the name have ever seen a single work from the artist's hand. For Audubon's magnificent life-size watercolor drawings of "The Birds of America" are not what we know. They were used, initially, as the basis of Robert Havell's 435 colored engravings, also life-size, which became the four volumes of "The Birds of America" (about 200 copies were produced)
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
The National Audubon Society has sold a 950-acre wildlife sanctuary it was given on the Eastern Shore to former Anne Arundel County executive Robert A. Pascal, who said Friday he plans to raise organic cattle and hay on part of it. Pascal and Audubon both declined to disclose the purchase price, though state assessment records valued the land and six homes there at $8.5 million. The waterfront estate near Bozman in Talbot County was once a hunting preserve for the DuPont family. It was donated to Audubon 13 years ago by Jean Ellen duPont Shehan to be a nature preserve and outdoor education center.
NEWS
March 17, 2002
Audubon Society of Central Maryland will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Mount Airy branch library, 705 Ridge Ave. Wayne Hildebrand, Maryland Calling Amphibian coordinator, will discuss Maryland's frogs and toads. The Central Maryland Chapter serves Carroll, Frederick and Howard counties, with membership concentrated in Columbia and Mount Airy. The chapter alternates meetings between Mount Airy and Columbia. Meetings are open to the public. Information: 410-833-5155.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | February 20, 2009
BOZMAN -This Eastern Shore estate, with its breathtaking waterfront, was supposed to be preserved forever, a natural gem that thousands of schoolchildren could visit to learn about the outdoors. That's what Jean Ellen duPont Shehan said she wanted when she donated her wealthy family's hunting preserve to the National Audubon Society 12 years ago. It is easy to see why she felt that way. Even on a frigid, wind-swept day, the land teems with wildlife. A reclusive wild turkey scuttles away into the brush as a car rolls down the lane.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | September 18, 2006
The birds have come home to roost. Come Wednesday, two distinctly Maryland birds - the Baltimore oriole and the raven - will await admirers from their unusual perch in the Maryland State Law Library in Annapolis. The ruby-throated hummingbird and the summer red bird sit there now. They are part of the library's rare collection of John James Audubon's 19th-century Birds of America prints, newly returned from desperately needed art conservation. The $300,000 restoration was part of an $854,000 project to tend to preservation of the library's rare collections.
NEWS
October 23, 2006
The Audubon Watershed Experience, which receives state funding, organizes opportunities for area high school students to learn more about the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The program also gives the students the chance to teach younger children about the environment of the watershed through fishing and bird watching.
NEWS
February 25, 2009
Let state preserve Shehan property The article "Economy puts future of sanctuary in doubt" (Feb. 20) doesn't precisely report that Audubon is honoring both the intent and the terms of Jean Ellen duPont Shehan's generous gift by seeking the ongoing protection of the property. We hope the state will be able to acquire and protect the property for public use. If the state is unable to do so, we will be forced to find a private conservation buyer but will still protect the property with an appropriate conservation easement or restrictive covenants.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | May 11, 1997
EARLY MAY in Maryland is a time of fulfillment and renewal. Late enough in the year to see the verdant rebirth of grass, budding leaves and flowering shrubs, the return of robins and other winged migrants and the gardens ablaze with newfound color. Still too early to worry much about mowing and trimming and weeding, and the enervating humid heat.But this mid-spring also brings disappointment, as we sweep the long neglected fall-winter detritus from the porch and eaves.Above in the corner of the overhang is the still vacant, baked mud shell of the phoebe's nest.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2010
The average golfer enjoys water about as much as the Wicked Witch of the West in "The Wizard of Oz . " Those teeing up at Eisenhower Golf Course, a tree-lined public layout in Crownsville, might have even worse nightmares than the norm. Thick, native grasses up to 3 feet high surround every creek and pond, reaching toward the sky as though part of a fiendish plot to snag wayward shots. "I tell the players we have great sales at the pro shop," says course superintendent Mike Papineau in joking reference to the fact that golf courses resell the balls they find in hazards.
NEWS
February 25, 2009
Let state preserve Shehan property The article "Economy puts future of sanctuary in doubt" (Feb. 20) doesn't precisely report that Audubon is honoring both the intent and the terms of Jean Ellen duPont Shehan's generous gift by seeking the ongoing protection of the property. We hope the state will be able to acquire and protect the property for public use. If the state is unable to do so, we will be forced to find a private conservation buyer but will still protect the property with an appropriate conservation easement or restrictive covenants.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | February 20, 2009
BOZMAN -This Eastern Shore estate, with its breathtaking waterfront, was supposed to be preserved forever, a natural gem that thousands of schoolchildren could visit to learn about the outdoors. That's what Jean Ellen duPont Shehan said she wanted when she donated her wealthy family's hunting preserve to the National Audubon Society 12 years ago. It is easy to see why she felt that way. Even on a frigid, wind-swept day, the land teems with wildlife. A reclusive wild turkey scuttles away into the brush as a car rolls down the lane.
NEWS
October 23, 2006
The Audubon Watershed Experience, which receives state funding, organizes opportunities for area high school students to learn more about the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The program also gives the students the chance to teach younger children about the environment of the watershed through fishing and bird watching.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | October 23, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- Conservator Anna Krain sprinkles what looks like grated Parmesan cheese on a 19th-century print of winter wrens and rock wrens. But these crumbs are pure white vinyl eraser. Under Krain's gentle massage, they pull the top layer of dirt from this historic artwork in the Maryland State Law Library's collection of original Birds of America prints by wildlife illustrator John James Audubon. Over the past two years, the prints have been leaving Annapolis for the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts, a nonprofit workshop housed in a former ice cream factory.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | September 18, 2006
The birds have come home to roost. Come Wednesday, two distinctly Maryland birds - the Baltimore oriole and the raven - will await admirers from their unusual perch in the Maryland State Law Library in Annapolis. The ruby-throated hummingbird and the summer red bird sit there now. They are part of the library's rare collection of John James Audubon's 19th-century Birds of America prints, newly returned from desperately needed art conservation. The $300,000 restoration was part of an $854,000 project to tend to preservation of the library's rare collections.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | April 29, 1992
When Peggy Reigle checked out of corporate America, she thought she was leaving days of faxing and phone calls in her office at the New York Daily News.She thought wrong. Instead, amid the osprey nests and duck ponds of her Eastern Shore farm, she found a battle of a different sort: Peggy Reigle took on those who saw fit to reclassify more than 20 acres of her property as wetlands -- after she had bought it.The villains, as she sees it, are environmentalists."I'm a devout conservationist, but I would never use the word environmentalist.
NEWS
April 19, 1994
The Audubon Society of Central Maryland will present the Conservation Award to Chandler S. Robbins for his lifelong service to the study and conservation of migratory birds during its next meeting at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in the Florence Bain Senior Center at 5470 Beaverkill Road in Columbia.Mr. Robbins is the senior ornithologist at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.He is the founder of the Breeding Bird Survey and introduced breeding bird atlases to North America.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,Special to the Sun | October 10, 2004
John James Audubon, by Richard Rhodes. Alfred A. Knopf. 528 pages. $30. After reading Richard Rhodes' Audubon biography -- the third published this year -- I can't wait for the Broadway musical. Can a movie be far behind? It's a story with everything. Illegitimate teenage son of a French naval officer is sent to the United States to escape conscription into Napoleon's army and start a business career. Flops because he is more interested in wildlife and drawing. Goes to the edge of the wilderness at the beginning of the 19th century, where he makes a living doing portraits, and teaching art, music and French to patrons, while planning a revolutionary picture book on birds that eventually will be regarded as an unparalleled work, elevating the science of ornithology into art. Audubon's story includes sex, violence and comic relief: A mysterious woman has him do a nude portrait of her in New Orleans.
FEATURES
September 9, 2003
Hope, Emily Dickinson wrote, is the thing with feathers. Surely that's the primary trait shared by the gaggle of Democrats who say they want to take on President Bush in next fall's election. Tonight at 8, these nine high-flying candidates will flock to Morgan State University to show off their plumage, flutter their wings and occasionally cry fowl. (You can watch all the preening on cable's Fox News.) But how can the average voter truly differentiate among this babbling brood? We asked amateur ornithologist and Sun cartoonist KAL to identify, describe and detail in picture each member of the species.
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