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NEWS
June 16, 2012
I'm glad MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakehas provided funding for additional auditor positions ("Rawlings-Blake calls for regular city audits," June 13). The new auditors' first assignment should be to determine why Baltimore needs 55 city agencies. After that, they should be tasked with identifying ways to consolidate some of these agencies. The Department of Audits currently conducts independent audits of each agency; however, in doing so, they are unlikely to detect overlaps among agencies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has appointed a three-member panel to distribute up to $3 million to the owners of historic properties whose tax bills in coming years will be higher than what government officials told them to expect. Retired Baltimore City Circuit Judge  John M.  Glynn, City Auditor Robert McCarty, and City Solicitor George Nilson will decide which owners will get the checks, which will cover portions of up to nine years of future tax bills. About 75 property owners submitted applications that could make them eligible to receive the checks, city officials said.
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NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2011
State auditors have questioned $88,000 in claims paid to health care providers by the Family Health Administration in the last two fiscal years. The auditors said in a report made public Tuesday that the FHA, which provides health care services to at-risk communities, did not adequately make sure claims were legitimate. For instance, from January 2008 to July 2009 the agency paid for several medical procedures that were considered questionable because records show accompanying care, such as anesthesia, was not provided.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
A new state audit says Maryland's public defender's office is failing to properly document whether its clients are poor enough to need its help. The periodic review by the state's Office of Legislative Audits, released Thursday, also found the office is struggling with cost overruns and heavy workloads for attorneys, and needs to do more to put resources where they are most needed. Those findings and questions about client screenings have been raised in previous audits. The state Office of the Public Defender provides legal representation to poor people charged with crimes.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
State tax officials should take steps to help ensure that Marylanders who receive the homestead property tax credit remain eligible for the popular discount, auditors said in a report released Wednesday. Auditors also said state officials should methodically review some past recipients to identify owners who have gotten large tax discounts improperly — and who should refund the government. "There are ways to be proactive about this and not depend on people providing tips," state Legislative Auditor Thomas J. Barnickel III said in an interview Wednesday.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
State auditors are examining how well Maryland's assessments agency has managed the homestead property tax credit, a popular tax break for homeowners that has come under increased scrutiny since The Baltimore Sun revealed that hundreds of city owners were improperly receiving multiple credits. Auditors have been at the Department of Assessments and Taxation for the past two weeks, said its director, Robert E. Young. The goal is to complete a review of the homestead credit program in time for next year's General Assembly session, which starts in January, according to chief auditor Bruce Myers.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | February 17, 1995
Washington -- William F. Gibson has moved again to muzzle Coopers & Lybrand auditors on the eve of tomorrow's vote that may end his 10-year reign as board chairman of the NAACP.Sources at NAACP headquarters in Baltimore tell me that Dr. Gibson is trying desperately to prevent the board from learning lTC the exact amounts of his credit-card transactions; about plane tickets for his female companion paid for by the NAACP, or about the $126,000 limousine bill that the NAACP ran up between November 1993 and January 1995.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Two of Baltimore's top elected officials objected Wednesday to the administration's plan for choosing outside auditors to monitor large agencies, such as police and public works. Officials with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration told the city's spending board that they are taking steps to ensure the performance and finances of 13 major agencies are audited once very four years, as required by a recent city charter amendment. But Comptroller Joan M. Pratt and City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young said the independence of the reviews are in question under the administration's plan.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
State officials placed at least 32 children in foster homes despite credible evidence that the care providers had abused or neglected children, according to a General Assembly audit released Friday. Auditors found that officials with the Social Services Administration also failed to follow up on 159 children born to parents who had had their parental rights terminated for abuse or neglect. The auditors blamed the computer system that the Maryland agency uses to monitor child services and said many of the deficiencies had not been corrected.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2011
Maryland Transportation Secretary Beverley K. Swaim-Staley told state lawmakers Tuesday that internal auditors knew about some irregularities in the awarding of contracts by the State Highway Administration but didn't raise an alarm. The transportation chief went before the General Assembly's Joint Committee on Audits to respond to two reports this year that identified ethical lapses and violations of contracting rules in one of the largest agencies of state government. Swaim-Staley said she is moving aggressively to change a culture at the SHA that put getting work done above abiding by the state's procurement laws.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
An employee at the Baltimore office of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs inappropriately stored thousands of documents - including some that contained Social Security data - according to testimony from an inspector general to be made public on Monday. About 8,000 documents, including claims folders, unprocessed mail and Social Security information of dead or incarcerated veterans were stored in an employee's office for "an extensive period of time," according to testimony from Linda A. Halliday, an assistant inspector general, that was reviewed by The Baltimore Sun. The incident is one of several examples included in a scathing assessment of the department that Halliday will offer in a hearing Monday before the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
You've likely heard about the secret audit of Baltimore's speed camera program, which found error rates much higher than city officials had acknowledged. Turns out that's only part of the story. Engineering firm URS Corp. also delivered to City Hall a second audit report that found additional errors at even more cameras. And it, too, was kept secret for nearly a year. The second report came to light when the city's law department turned over roughly 100,000 pages of documents to a City Council committee investigating the cameras.
HEALTH
By John Fritze and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Maryland's top health official told a congressional panel in Washington on Thursday that IT contractors were to blame for the state's troubled rollout of the Affordable Care Act and suggested that the state may reimburse the federal government if it can claw back money from those companies. Though Maryland Health Secretary Joshua M. Sharfstein has repeatedly testified in Annapolis about the launch of the glitch-prone website, the hearing by a subcommittee of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee was the first time he has publicly addressed questions from federal lawmakers about the exchange.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Two of Baltimore's top elected officials objected Wednesday to the administration's plan for choosing outside auditors to monitor large agencies, such as police and public works. Officials with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration told the city's spending board that they are taking steps to ensure the performance and finances of 13 major agencies are audited once very four years, as required by a recent city charter amendment. But Comptroller Joan M. Pratt and City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young said the independence of the reviews are in question under the administration's plan.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
Both Gov. Martin O'Malley and Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown say they welcome the federal review into Maryland's botched health insurance exchange that's coming at the request of Rep. Andy Harris. A spokesman for Mr. Brown's gubernatorial campaign said the feds' involvement will be helpful "so we can learn from these challenges," and Mr. O'Malley issued a statement saying the review was "welcome" but blaming vendors who "failed to deliver the product they promised. " If that's so, both of them could speed along the process of lesson-learning (or blame-shifting to the vendors, if that is in fact appropriate)
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
The head of the state Senate committee that is leading an inquiry into what went wrong with Maryland's health exchange is planning to turn the probe over to state auditors — who would not release a report until summer at the earliest. Sen. Thomas M. Middleton, who chairs the Finance Committee, said this week that the panel is unlikely to hold further hearings on the matter this legislative session. His "tentative" plan is to give the mountain of documents that his committee requested from health officials to legislative auditors, who already were scheduled to do a financial review of the exchange this summer.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1995
With uncertainty looming about USAir's ability to win crucial labor concessions, company auditors for the first time have raised questions about whether the airline can survive.After a two-week delay, USAir Group Inc. filed its year-end financial report yesterday with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in which the company's accountants concluded there was "substantial doubt" whether the airline could continue operating in its current form.Since 1988, the airline has lost more than $3 billion, including $684.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
The Maryland Tax Court has frequently failed to rule on residential property assessment cases as promptly as the law requires, according to a state audit made public Thursday. The court, which hears appeals in cases involving state and local taxes, must hear and decide residential property assessment cases within 90 days. But 41 percent of the cases heard between July 2010 and mid-February took longer - as much as a year past the 90-day point, the Office of Legislative Audits said.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Millions of dollars in scholarship money that the state could have provided to about 8,000 needy college students has sat untouched, according to an audit released Wednesday. Auditors from the Office of Legislative Audits found that the Maryland Higher Education Commission did not spend all of the money in its scholarship fund, with the number growing from $9.9 million in 2011 to $17.2 million this year. Auditors estimated that the $17 million could have paid for the scholarships of about 7,800 of the 16,400 students on a waiting list.
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