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By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
You've likely heard about the secret audit of Baltimore's speed camera program, which found error rates much higher than city officials had acknowledged. Turns out that's only part of the story. Engineering firm URS Corp. also delivered to City Hall a second audit report that found additional errors at even more cameras. And it, too, was kept secret for nearly a year. The second report came to light when the city's law department turned over roughly 100,000 pages of documents to a City Council committee investigating the cameras.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
You've likely heard about the secret audit of Baltimore's speed camera program, which found error rates much higher than city officials had acknowledged. Turns out that's only part of the story. Engineering firm URS Corp. also delivered to City Hall a second audit report that found additional errors at even more cameras. And it, too, was kept secret for nearly a year. The second report came to light when the city's law department turned over roughly 100,000 pages of documents to a City Council committee investigating the cameras.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Meredith Schlow and Larry Carson and Meredith Schlow,Staff Writers | March 8, 1992
As Baltimore County Council members, their auditor and school officials prepare for the battle of the school budget, they can't even agree on how many people actually work for the Department of Education.An auditor's report says there were 10,201 employees on the school payroll in 1991. School Superintendent Robert Y. Dubel insists there were only 9,563.Those 638 humans, whoever and wherever they may be, will be critical as the school administration defends itself against an audit report that says the department has too many administrators.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
A legislative audit released Wednesday found that Towson University was slow to act when students repeatedly wrote bad tuition checks and that a $4.3 million agreement with the Maryland Department of Transportation circumvented Maryland procurement rules. The audit states that 78 students submitted two or more bad tuition checks worth $650,000 over two or more semesters. If the university had placed the proper holds on their accounts, the repeat offenses couldn't have occurred. The school promised to take "timely and appropriate action against students who are in arrears.
NEWS
By T. Christian Miller and T. Christian Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 31, 2005
WASHINGTON - The U.S.-led provisional government in charge of Iraq until last summer was unable to properly account for nearly $9 billion in Iraqi funds it was charged with safeguarding, according to a scathing new audit report. The Coalition Provisional Authority may have paid salaries for thousands of nonexistent "ghost employees" in Iraqi ministries, issued unauthorized multimillion-dollar contracts and provided little oversight of spending in possibly corrupt ministries, according to the report by Stuart W. Bowen Jr., the special inspector general for Iraq reconstruction.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | March 26, 2008
A House of Delegates panel decided yesterday to strip $3 million in planning money for Morgan State University's business school from next year's budget and to restrict another $3 million in building projects until the school overhauls its procurement processes, which are under criminal investigation by the state attorney general's office. Yesterday's action by the House Appropriations Committee's education subcommittee was the strongest response yet by the legislature to an audit report that found millions in questionable contracts at the Northeast Baltimore school.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2005
The head of the Prince George's County schools resigned yesterday, just days before school board members were to receive an audit report about a $1 million purchase from an education software company that employed his girlfriend. The resignation of CEO Andre J. Hornsby came without warning amid a controversy that has shadowed the county system for most of this school year and sparked an FBI investigation. For months, Hornsby had vowed to persevere amid questions about his dealings with education vendors, while board members defended him or said they needed more information before considering action.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | August 22, 1991
Eleven private bus firms that provided school bus transportation for handicapped students during the 1989-1990 school year overbilled the city by a total of $227,144, according to a city audit report.The report says that the bus companies took advantage of oversights by the city Department of Education's Transportation Services Division to routinely bill the city for mileage not covered by their buses and time not spent on their routes."Since the inception of this contract, transportation services has not performed adequate reconciliations of [routes on file]
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Evening Sun Staff | August 27, 1991
The city auditor has found the now-defunct Park Heights Community Corp. misused more than $60,000 in federal money by paying cash advances to employees, by claiming bogus office expenses and by paying for an out-of-town trip and auto repairs.An audit report released yesterday by city auditor Allan L. Reynolds notes a continuing history of financial problems at the northwest Baltimore organization, dating back six years.In January, the city's Department of Housing and Community Development closed down the community corporation, following allegations of financial irregularities and infighting.
NEWS
By T. Christian Miller and T. Christian Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 5, 2005
WASHINGTON - The U.S. government has opened a criminal inquiry into suspected embezzling by officials who failed to account for nearly $100 million they disbursed for Iraqi reconstruction projects, federal investigators said yesterday. Auditors have been unable to fully document how the money was doled out to Iraqi workers by a small group of officials working from a U.S. outpost in Hillah, according to an audit report released yesterday by Stuart W. Bowen Jr., the special inspector general for Iraq reconstruction.
NEWS
October 8, 2012
Because Baltimore City has long struggled to correct the problems of its chronically underperforming school system, Maryland has for decades funded education in the city at a higher level than other jurisdictions. That is why a preliminary audit report detailing evidence of waste, fraud and abuse in the system represents a potentially devastating indictment of the city's school reform effort. If allegations of mismanagement, lax oversight and incompetence lead lawmakers in Annapolis to question the city's use of the public funds it receives, support for school reform here could dry up overnight.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2011
A suspicious pattern of bidding on state grants for installing less-polluting septic systems - part of a wide-ranging critique of the Maryland Department of the Environment - has prompted legislative auditors to call for a criminal investigation. In a report released Thursday, auditors found a series of fiscal, management and regulatory problems at the agency, including potential violations of state law for hiring a retiring employee as a consultant. The audit also faulted the department's handling of a computer system upgrade and oversight of construction sites, hazardous-materials facilities and rental housing containing lead paint.
NEWS
October 31, 2011
I read with anticipation Paul Richter's article "Lost Iraqi Billions Found" (Oct. 28) with the assurance these funds would be accounted for and shown to be spent for purposes intended. Unfortunately, Mr. Richter seems to list the billions not found. We read about $100 bills shipped in shrink wrapped bundles (was this to insure, using cash, its spending would not be tracked, as in drug laundered cash?). Then we read that the "audit" found that "most" had been turned over to Iraqi authorities.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2011
A three-page preliminary audit report on Howard County's Domestic Violence Center gave the nonprofit a clean bill of fiscal health but criticized the organization's former board for its efforts at a background check before hiring the former director. "We have not found any evidence to indicate any irregularities," County Auditor Haskell Arnold said, though the agency will need to carefully monitor its funds to get through the year. Thanks to a $275,000 surplus, the agency is in the black, Arnold said.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | September 10, 2008
State police officials tried yesterday to reassure critics in the General Assembly that Maryland's emergency medical transport system was in capable hands despite a recent audit detailing numerous maintenance and management deficiencies at the police-run helicopter fleet. "We would urge members of the committee not to let our administrative shortcomings overshadow decades of accomplishment," Maj. Andrew J. McAndrew, commander of the police's Aviation Command, told the committee that commissioned the audit report published last month.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | March 26, 2008
A House of Delegates panel decided yesterday to strip $3 million in planning money for Morgan State University's business school from next year's budget and to restrict another $3 million in building projects until the school overhauls its procurement processes, which are under criminal investigation by the state attorney general's office. Yesterday's action by the House Appropriations Committee's education subcommittee was the strongest response yet by the legislature to an audit report that found millions in questionable contracts at the Northeast Baltimore school.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2004
The state agency that oversees the Maryland National Guard and statewide emergency management services paid a business affiliated with two of its employees for building maintenance and repair work - an arrangement that might have violated state ethics laws, according to an audit report made public yesterday. The Military Department did not seek competitive bids, and there was no written contract for the work, auditors said. The company was paid $34,850 from April 2002 through October of last year, auditors said.
NEWS
By Newsday | May 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Interior Department continues to make poor progress in locating and cleaning up hazardous wastes on hTC the 440 million acres of public lands over which it has stewardship, the department's inspector general has concluded.In a recently completed report, the auditor said Interior agencies have been "inordinately slow in cleaning up contaminated sites," such as landfills and abandoned mines, and have made unsatisfactory progress in trying to find and evaluate sites that .. could potentially endanger human health or natural resources.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | April 27, 2006
The spouse of a Department of General Services official who oversees the sale of surplus state property was allowed to purchase a used car directly from a Maryland agency at a price below what it likely would have sold for at auction, according to an audit released yesterday. Legislative auditors said the June sale "appears to have violated state ethics law and a prior ethics opinion" and referred the matter to the State Ethics Commission for review. The transaction -- which came to auditors' attention through a tip to a fraud hot line -- prompted General Services Secretary Boyd K. Rutherford to order policy changes in January.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2005
The head of the Prince George's County schools resigned yesterday, just days before school board members were to receive an audit report about a $1 million purchase from an education software company that employed his girlfriend. The resignation of CEO Andre J. Hornsby came without warning amid a controversy that has shadowed the county system for most of this school year and sparked an FBI investigation. For months, Hornsby had vowed to persevere amid questions about his dealings with education vendors, while board members defended him or said they needed more information before considering action.
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