Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAudience
IN THE NEWS

Audience

ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
There's something about "Les Miserables" that keeps me coming back. It's not that "Les Miz," running through Sunday at the Hippodrome Theatre , is my favorite musical. Far from it. It's all too easy to point out the technical flaws in Claude-Michel Schonberg's melodies (bombastic) and Herbert Kretzmer's lyrics (unsurprising). The critics have been making these arguments for the past 27 years, and for the past 27 years, audiences have been ignoring the critics. Producer Cameron Mackintosh's much-hyped new staging incorporates brighter costumes and screen projections to simulate such effects as Paris' underground sewers.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lexie Mountain and Midnight Sun contributor | April 10, 2013
I have to admit that even though "Second Hand News" is a great way to kick off a night of what was clearly going to be hit after hit of A+, No. 1, solid-gold Fleetwood Mac tunes, hearing Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks sing the first few measures put a little stone in my throat. Lindsey sounded ragged and rough: Did he give too much to Madison Square Garden the night before? Perhaps over-carousing? Does Lindsey deign to carouse? And Stevie, oh Stevie, the top range of her uniquely fluid yet meaty voice clipped.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair told a Baltimore audience Tuesday night that the world's challenges have never been greater, nor come with such speed, and he advocated intervention in struggling countries by powers such as Great Britain and the United States. "I don't think there's been a more difficult time to be a political leader than now," Blair, who left office in 2007, told an audience of 2,800 at Loyola University Maryland. He described challenges posed by globalization and ever-evolving technology and said that "often the best short-term politics is in collision with the best long-term policy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2013
There's a meme going around the Internet that compares “Game of Thrones” with “The Walking Dead.” The zombie show, the meme says, makes you hate its characters before killing them. “Thrones,” however, makes you like them. And that is, I think, objectively true. Even this show's vilest characters (the Lannisters, for instance) all have redeeming qualities. After spending enough time with them, you being to surprise yourself by gravitating toward characters you once reviled.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Here's an all-too common scenario at a bar: A random topic - be it essential new-wave albums or Martin Scorsese's best films - comes up and an expert suddenly emerges. The know-it-all rapidly cites a dizzying array of research and anecdotes, all in the name of appearing smarter than everyone else. The person also usually hopes no one double-checks the claims. "You always have somebody who knows way too much about something, but then they hope you're not going to look [facts] up," said Patrick Storck, a 37-year-old living in Belair-Edison.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
A few years ago, the History Channel was best known to some as a punch line on HBO's “The Sopranos.” Remember mobster Tony Soprano sitting alone late at night in his New Jersey McMansion eating ice cream and watching World War II documentaries about Adolph Hitler and Winston Churchill? These days, no one is laughing at the History Channel - not with audiences like the 13.1 million viewers who tuned in last Sunday for the first two hours of “The Bible,” a 10-hour miniseries that runs through Easter Sunday.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
Sunday's Super Bowl was the most viewed show in U.S. television history, according to Nielsen figures provided by CBS. A total audience of 164.1 million saw the Ravens victory over the San Francisco 49ers. The average audience for Sunday's game was 108.4 million viewers, which was the third largest average audience behind the last two Super Bowls. Total viewership is generally considered the benchmark figure. Here's the CBS release: The 2012 NFL season concluded with another television milestone as Super Bowl XLVII on CBS reached a total audience of 164.1 million viewers (6:32-8:41 and 9:11-10:47 PM, ET)
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
The Ravens Super Bowl victory over the San Francisco 49ers was the highest rated telecast in Nielsen meter history, according to preliminary ratings from CBS. With almost one out of every two TV homes in the nation tuned to the game, it topped the Green Bay vs. Pittsburgh Super Bowl 2011 game.  The rating excludes the period from 8:45 to 9:15 p.m. when play was stopped because of a blackout in stadium lights. Here's the release from CBS: CBS Sports' coverage of Super Bowl XLVII featuring the BALTIMORE RAVENS, 34-31 win over the SAN FRANCISCO 49ers on Sunday, Feb. 3  (6:30-8:45 PM and 9:15-10:45 PM, ET)
SPORTS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2013
UPDATE (1 a.m.) at end of post with review of NFL Network's excellent post-game show and comment on Flacco profanity after game. It was a fabulous day and night for TV football, with the Ravens winning the Super Bowl , 34-31. But little thanks for that goes to CBS, the network that had broadcast rights to the game. The network's pregame show was overproduced and under-imagined, with no unifying vision. One segment that found Boomer Esiason and Shannon Sharpe walking the streets of New Orleans handing out Pizza Hut pizzas to people willing to yell "hut, hut, hut," set a new low in debasing broadcasters and turning what is already an over-commercialized production into a nonstop advertisement.
NEWS
By Michael Hill | January 24, 2013
As a longtime fan of bicycle racing - I was on the finish line in Paris in 1986 when Greg LeMond became the first American to win the Tour de France - I followed Lance Armstrong's career with intense excitement as he took cycling from the wings to center stage in his country's sport consciousness. That said, it became clear that while his story of cancer survival was compelling and inspiring, Mr. Armstrong was not a pleasant person. He was selfish and self-centered. But so are many athletes.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.