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NEWS
By Jessica Goldstein and Jessica Goldstein,special to the sun | December 6, 2006
Jury duty. Two words that resound painfully in the ears of anyone who has ever had to endure the agony that is the American justice system. However, performers at Long Reach High School showed last week that even jury duty can be fun with their recent production of The Night of January 16th. The Night of January 16th, written by Ayn Rand, is a courtroom drama set in the 1930s addressing the death of wealthy financier Bjorn Faulkner. Accused of his murder is Karen Andre, his mistress and secretary of 10 years.
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FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2001
John Stamos sheepishly took the stage during Michael Jackson's nearly 12-hour "United We Stand" benefit concert. It was 10:30 p.m. - about two hours before the concert actually would end - and Stamos, the host of the event, apologetically explained to the already impatient audience that he was going to have to cut in on the program and record his closing speech for the TV cameras, because the show was running almost three hours late. An audience of about 46,000 had gone to RFK Stadium for one of the most star-studded events ever held in the area.
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | November 2, 1990
People are seldom at their best right after a murder, so I suppose it's only natural that no one believed I was a journalist.After a while, even I wasn't too sure, but fortunately they managed to find the killer before I confessed.The scene of the crime was the upstairs banquet room at the Middleton Tavern in Annapolis. There, a group of very talented improvisational actors known as the "Murder Upon Request Theatrical Group" has been knocking off people on a monthly basis for nearly two years.
TOPIC
By Tim Rutten and Tim Rutten,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2004
Presidential elections always challenge the press: The pace of events and competitive pressure invariably war with the media's duties to provide balance and perspective. Readers, viewers and listeners inevitably become more critical news consumers as their personal preferences solidify. This year, the polls instruct us, the country is likely to approach November so exquisitely divided that serious analysts actually wonder whether Michael Moore's anti-administration agitprop might tip the electoral scales.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1994
Move over, Marky Mark. Make way for Bill Clinton.Presidential undergarments entered public discourse yesterday during an MTV forum with 200 young people.And the credit -- or blame -- goes to Laetitia Thompson, 17, of Potomac. After listening to questions about gun control, drug prevention and Bosnia, she stood up and spoke her mind."Mr. President," she asked, "the world's dying to know: Is it boxers or briefs?"Stunned, Mr. Clinton paused and smiled. "Usually briefs," he replied, adding I "can't believe she did that."
NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 28, 2000
LES PETITS Chanteurs d'Aix-en-Provence (The Little Singers from Aix-en-Provence) delivered a spellbinding performance Sunday at St. Michael's Roman Catholic Church in Mount Airy. Nearly 300 people were treated to an evening of powerful voices and melodic harmonies of these very talented French boys and young men. The choir is made up of about 40 French boys and young men ages 7 to 20 from the city of Aix-en-Provence, a vacation paradise in southeastern France and the birthplace of painter Paul Cezanne in 1839.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | May 20, 2009
When visitors come, you want to show off the good stuff. Crabs on the Fells Point waterfront. Sailing the Inner Harbor. Walks around Fort McHenry. The dolphin show at the aquarium. An afternoon Orioles game. Recently, I had guests who wanted to see the other Baltimore, the one with the bodies and the bloodshed, the one with the boarded rowhouses and empty neighborhoods, the one TV news and TV entertainment have blurred into one macabre pageant of urban ills, dysfunction and misfortune.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 13, 2006
The stunning Lena Olin once said she found men most attractive when they didn't think they were attractive. She was speaking of Oliver Platt in Casanova, but she might have been talking about Paul Giamatti. He earned a cult following by bringing gusto to roles such as the officious, tyrannical radio programmer called Pig Vomit in Private Parts. He won widespread acclaim as the cantankerous cartoonist Harvey Pekar in American Splendor. But he found a whole new following as the depressed, divorced novelist and wine expert in Sideways who stumbles into love with that knockout Virginia Madsen.
NEWS
By Michael R. Driscoll and Michael R. Driscoll,Staff writer | January 2, 1991
Overall, the effort was none too shabby for a show that took a year to plan and closed on its opening night.In fact, the debut of First Night Annapolis, a safe, family-oriented New Year's Eve celebration of culture and the lively arts, was a lot of fun. It was a very nice evening, spent with thousands of friends and neighbors who just wanted to have a good time.Everyone and everything seemed to cooperate to make the evening work. The night was brisk and clear, and people who missed one event just shrugged and went off to find another.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
HBO's "Game Change," the docudrama about the John McCain and Sarah Palin presidential campaign in 2008, was a big ratings winner for HBO in its Saturday premiere drawing 2.1 million viewers. That was the largest debut audience for an HBO movie since Something the Lord Made" in 2004, according to the Hollywood Reporter. Read that here . That film about a pioneering medical worker at Johns Hopkins was also filmed in Maryland, by the way. It drew an audience of 2.6 million.
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