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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1994
Move over, Marky Mark. Make way for Bill Clinton.Presidential undergarments entered public discourse yesterday during an MTV forum with 200 young people.And the credit -- or blame -- goes to Laetitia Thompson, 17, of Potomac. After listening to questions about gun control, drug prevention and Bosnia, she stood up and spoke her mind."Mr. President," she asked, "the world's dying to know: Is it boxers or briefs?"Stunned, Mr. Clinton paused and smiled. "Usually briefs," he replied, adding I "can't believe she did that."
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FEATURES
By Jeremy Gerard and Jeremy Gerard,N.Y. Times News Service | December 4, 1990
NEW YORK -- NBC won an increasingly tight contest in November between the three major broadcast networks for leadership in prime time. But it led ABC and CBS by just one-tenth of a ratings point, underscoring the inability of all three networks to stem audience attrition and develop new hit programs this season.Total network viewership during the sweeps in November, one of four months when ratings are used to determine local advertising rates, was down 3 percent, to 63 percent from 66 percent last year, according to statistics gathered by the A.C. Nielsen Co. and distributed recently by ABC, CBS, and NBC. For the season that began on Sept.
FEATURES
By J.L. Conklin and J.L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | February 21, 1995
The images that New York choreographer/performer Jawole Willa Jo Zollar imprints on her seven-member all-woman dance company, Urban Bush Women, are those of womanly strength and boundless energy. She stratifies her dances with layers of African traditions and everyday experiences as an African-American female.It was a coup for the Dance on the Edge series to bring the critically acclaimed Urban Bush Women to Baltimore. It was a shame such a sparse audience saw them at Morgan State University's Murphy Theater over the weekend.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 13, 1996
Fewer people are watching television news and more are questioning its credibility, says a nationwide survey that will be released today.While the television news industry -- from CNN to prime-time network newsmagazines to local newscasts -- showed decline as a whole, the biggest losers in audience and credibility are the nightly newscasts of ABC, CBS and NBC. Although often described as a national ritual, viewing the 6 p.m. newscasts has declined among...
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | March 3, 1993
"Yo momma's so ugly, when she cries the tears roll down the back of her head because they too scared to go down the front," one woman shouted to her girlfriend."Well, yo family's so poor, when I went over to your house and stepped on a cigarette, your momma yelled 'who turned off the heat,' " said another.And the laughter of about 50 people resounded like a gospel choir in Western Maryland College's Baker Memorial Chapel Sunday night during the Black Student Union Drama Fest 1993.The intimate group was as diverse as the acts were different.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | September 23, 1993
What: "Lawd Ha' Mercy!!"Where: Lyric Opera House, 140 W. Mount ROyal Ave.When: Tonight through Sunday at 8 p.m., matinees Saturdays and Sunday at 3 p.m.Tickets: $11.50-$25.50Call: (410) 481-7328"Lawd Ha' Mercy!!" is the latest in a wave of gospel musicals achieving popularity across the country for reasons that seem to have more to do with rafter-raising spirituals and overt religious messages than polished stagecraft.Like most of its predecessors, "Lawd" -- running through Sunday at the Lyric Opera House -- tells the story of a character who forsakes her church upbringing for wicked worldly pleasures, then finds her way back to God in the end.But in this show -- written, directed and produced by Morgan State alum David E. Talbert -- something different happens immediately following the piously-ever-after ending.
FEATURES
By STEPHEN WIGLER and STEPHEN WIGLER,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 6, 1996
One hopes that it is only the relative unfamiliarity of the Gordon Center for Performing Arts that resulted in an audience of only about 50 listeners for the violin-and-piano recital by the brother-and-sister team of Corey and Katja Cerovsek.The 550-seat Gordon Center, which is located in Owings Mills, is not the easiest place to find. But it is most unfortunate if music lovers continue to miss hearing chamber-music offerings so attractive in so acoustically lively a space as the Gordon Center.
FEATURES
By Kenneth Meltzer and Kenneth Meltzer,Special to The Sun | April 20, 1994
Carlo Bergonzi, the greatest Verdi tenor of the postwar generation, brought his illustrious North American career to a graceful and emotional conclusion Sunday night at New York's Carnegie Hall with his farewell recital. A capacity audience was in attendance to pay tribute to an artist who has been a paragon of Italian style, musicianship and passion for more than 40 years.Like all great artists who have enjoyed long, successful careers, Mr. Bergonzi has always been the most acute judge of his vocal strengths and limitations.
NEWS
By Jessica Goldstein and Jessica Goldstein,special to the sun | December 6, 2006
Jury duty. Two words that resound painfully in the ears of anyone who has ever had to endure the agony that is the American justice system. However, performers at Long Reach High School showed last week that even jury duty can be fun with their recent production of The Night of January 16th. The Night of January 16th, written by Ayn Rand, is a courtroom drama set in the 1930s addressing the death of wealthy financier Bjorn Faulkner. Accused of his murder is Karen Andre, his mistress and secretary of 10 years.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2001
John Stamos sheepishly took the stage during Michael Jackson's nearly 12-hour "United We Stand" benefit concert. It was 10:30 p.m. - about two hours before the concert actually would end - and Stamos, the host of the event, apologetically explained to the already impatient audience that he was going to have to cut in on the program and record his closing speech for the TV cameras, because the show was running almost three hours late. An audience of about 46,000 had gone to RFK Stadium for one of the most star-studded events ever held in the area.
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