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By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1997
Mini-jazz festivals pop up in Chesapeake Bay towns almost yearly now. And jazz often dominates the repertoire of new bands. County schools have begun to teach jazz.Jazz is making a comeback.But six years ago, when the soothing sound of saxophones was nothing more than a quiet grumbling in the local music scene, a group of classical music lovers had an idea."We knew a jazz festival would please the public," said Mary Melvin, who sits on the board of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra. "We wanted to attract a diverse audience."
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By David Zurawik | May 8, 2004
An audience of 51.1 million tuned in last night to the finale of NBC's Friends, making it the second most watched show of the year behind the Super Bowl, which was seen on CBS by about 90 million viewers. That's a big audience for the episode that ended with Ross and Rachel in each others' arms, but it set no records. The finale of M*A*S*H on CBS was seen by 105 million viewers in 1983 - the biggest audience for a final episode in network history. Cheers and Seinfeld, two far more groundbreaking sitcoms, also had larger audiences for their finales.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1996
You stand in line outside for as long as an hour. You have to wait almost as long for the big event to start. And depending on how many scene and costume changes are required, what takes a half-hour to watch on television may take two, three or four times that to sit through in person.And they expect you to find it all laugh-out-loud funny?That's pretty much how it works in the world of taped-before-a-studio-audience television. The fact that it works is testimony to the quality of the writing and acting or the willingness of studio audiences to do what they're told.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | April 12, 2005
The early-morning audience for the funeral of Pope John Paul II Friday was three times as large as that of regularly scheduled programming on the all-news cable channels, according to preliminary figures from Nielsen Media Research. But the overall size of the audience for the much-talked-about event won't be known for at least another day, according to Nielsen and network spokesmen. From 4 a.m. to 8 a.m. Friday, Fox News Channel, CNN and MSNBC were collectively seen by an average of more than 2 million viewers each hour.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | October 23, 1992
Garth Brooks is not the likeliest-looking pop idol.At a time when most male country stars are lean, tan and hunky, Brooks is pale, round-faced and pudgy, looking more like the Pillsbury Doughboy than a cowboy pin-up.But you wouldn't know it by the way his audience reacts.Last night at the Capital Centre, Brooks was on the receiving end of audience adulation all night.It wasn't just the usual screams and cheers, either; he spent as much time shaking hands, accepting presents and returning waves as he did singing and playing.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 16, 1992
CBS coverage of the Olympics was a hit with Baltimore area viewers. But WBAL-TV (Channel 11), the local CBS affiliate, wasn't able to do much with the huge prime-time audience the network delivered.That's the picture of TV viewing patterns in Baltimore during the important February "sweeps" ratings period, which emerges with the release of advance audience measurements from A. C. Nielsen yesterday.On average, TV sets in about 184,000 area homes were tuned to Channel 11 during prime time (from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.)
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Jensen and Elizabeth Jensen,New York Daily News | March 15, 1992
Maybe viewers just want to see whether Democratic candidate Jerry Brown can get his toll-free campaign contribution number past the ever-vigilant anchors.Despite a less animated campaign than in 1988, the networks' Super Tuesday election-results audience was the same this year as four years ago, good news for the networks in a time when ratings seem always to go lower year-to-year.It was still a small viewership, overall, however. CBS' 9 p.m. election special Tuesday averaged a 6.0 rating (percentage of the nation's 92.1 million TV households)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 16, 1991
Los Angeles---Americans are tuning to news programs in near-record numbers for information on the Gulf crisis. And the audience is growing.That's the early word from Nielsen ratings for late last week and early this week. The figures show that:*Since Friday, CNN's audience has been more than twice as large as normal on a full 24-hour cycle. Furthermore, peak viewing has topped some of the record audiences garnered by CNN in the aftermath of Iraq's invasion of Kuwait in August.The all-news cable channel achieved one of its largest audiences ever Saturday afternoon during President Bush's press conference following the vote in Congress backing use of force.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 10, 1993
Every now and then, we hear of singers who can move a audience to tears or bring a crowd to its feet. But what of a singer whose performance is so commanding that it actually induces a state of ecstasy among listeners -- even those who can't understand a word he sings?Sounds incredible, doesn't it? Yet that's typical of the kind of response Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan engenders. In fact, the 45-year-old Pakistani has become a legend among world-music enthusiasts, inciting such fervor among listeners around the globe.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Sun | June 6, 1994
Although Itzhak Perlman routinely sells out the most prestigious concert halls in the world, he always still finds time for worthy causes.In that spirit, he's giving a violin recital on Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at Beth Tfiloh Congregation in Pikesville as a benefit for the Beth Tfiloh Community School Scholarship Fund.Accompanied by pianist Samuel Sanders, Mr. Perlman says he'll play a program that includes sonatas by Brahms and Saint-Saens, as well as "some transcriptions by Jascha Heifetz in a sort of homage to Heifetz.
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