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Audience

ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 19, 1998
For some bands, a successful single is not always the blessing it seems. Audiences come out not because they like the band, but because they like that one particular record. After a while, the band begins to resent The Hit and secretly longs for the day they won't have to play it.Fortunately, that hasn't happened to Third Eye Blind.Even though the group's first single, the raucously infectious "Semi-Charmed Life," was a fixture on pop radio all fall, the group never got sick of playing it. Quite the opposite, says singer Stephan Jenkins.
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NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1997
Mini-jazz festivals pop up in Chesapeake Bay towns almost yearly now. And jazz often dominates the repertoire of new bands. County schools have begun to teach jazz.Jazz is making a comeback.But six years ago, when the soothing sound of saxophones was nothing more than a quiet grumbling in the local music scene, a group of classical music lovers had an idea."We knew a jazz festival would please the public," said Mary Melvin, who sits on the board of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra. "We wanted to attract a diverse audience."
FEATURES
By Scott Duncan and Scott Duncan,Evening Sun Staff | September 17, 1990
LIFESONGS 1990" was an affirmation of life, a re-dedication to the fight against AIDS and a celebration of the victory of style over adversity.And really, who has more style on this planet than George Burns and Eartha Kitt?Both charmed a sold-out audience at Meyerhoff Hall last night, which was decked out for the third-annual "Lifesongs" benefit for the Health Education Resource Organization, or HERO.Burns, 94, puffed on a cigar, rasped through his standard tunes, and delivered a stand-up (and part sit-down)
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | November 27, 1994
If you were writing in Denise Koch's baby book, on the page marked "Mom, Six Months' Pregnant (with twins!)," the entry would read:Dear Meg and Wynn,Your Mom is walking gingerly these days, tiptoeing around the house in shimmery gold ballet slippers like some plump fairy godmother.She's gained 19 pounds -- from eating muffins, hamburgers and ice cream mostly -- and her round form now pokes out beneath her purple blouse.But it's her face -- that angular, elegantly made-up anchorwoman face -- that shows how she feels about your arrival.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | May 8, 2004
An audience of 51.1 million tuned in last night to the finale of NBC's Friends, making it the second most watched show of the year behind the Super Bowl, which was seen on CBS by about 90 million viewers. That's a big audience for the episode that ended with Ross and Rachel in each others' arms, but it set no records. The finale of M*A*S*H on CBS was seen by 105 million viewers in 1983 - the biggest audience for a final episode in network history. Cheers and Seinfeld, two far more groundbreaking sitcoms, also had larger audiences for their finales.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | April 12, 2005
The early-morning audience for the funeral of Pope John Paul II Friday was three times as large as that of regularly scheduled programming on the all-news cable channels, according to preliminary figures from Nielsen Media Research. But the overall size of the audience for the much-talked-about event won't be known for at least another day, according to Nielsen and network spokesmen. From 4 a.m. to 8 a.m. Friday, Fox News Channel, CNN and MSNBC were collectively seen by an average of more than 2 million viewers each hour.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 16, 1992
CBS coverage of the Olympics was a hit with Baltimore area viewers. But WBAL-TV (Channel 11), the local CBS affiliate, wasn't able to do much with the huge prime-time audience the network delivered.That's the picture of TV viewing patterns in Baltimore during the important February "sweeps" ratings period, which emerges with the release of advance audience measurements from A. C. Nielsen yesterday.On average, TV sets in about 184,000 area homes were tuned to Channel 11 during prime time (from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.)
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Jensen and Elizabeth Jensen,New York Daily News | March 15, 1992
Maybe viewers just want to see whether Democratic candidate Jerry Brown can get his toll-free campaign contribution number past the ever-vigilant anchors.Despite a less animated campaign than in 1988, the networks' Super Tuesday election-results audience was the same this year as four years ago, good news for the networks in a time when ratings seem always to go lower year-to-year.It was still a small viewership, overall, however. CBS' 9 p.m. election special Tuesday averaged a 6.0 rating (percentage of the nation's 92.1 million TV households)
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | October 23, 1992
Garth Brooks is not the likeliest-looking pop idol.At a time when most male country stars are lean, tan and hunky, Brooks is pale, round-faced and pudgy, looking more like the Pillsbury Doughboy than a cowboy pin-up.But you wouldn't know it by the way his audience reacts.Last night at the Capital Centre, Brooks was on the receiving end of audience adulation all night.It wasn't just the usual screams and cheers, either; he spent as much time shaking hands, accepting presents and returning waves as he did singing and playing.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 16, 1991
Los Angeles---Americans are tuning to news programs in near-record numbers for information on the Gulf crisis. And the audience is growing.That's the early word from Nielsen ratings for late last week and early this week. The figures show that:*Since Friday, CNN's audience has been more than twice as large as normal on a full 24-hour cycle. Furthermore, peak viewing has topped some of the record audiences garnered by CNN in the aftermath of Iraq's invasion of Kuwait in August.The all-news cable channel achieved one of its largest audiences ever Saturday afternoon during President Bush's press conference following the vote in Congress backing use of force.
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