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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
"VEEP," the widely-praised Maryland-made comedy starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus, got off to a solid start Sunday night with an audience of 1.7 million viewers for two showings. The 10 p.m. showing opposite AMC's  "Mad Men"  drew 1.4 million viewers. "VEEP"  drew 300,000 more viewers than the finale of "Eastbound and Down,"  which aired the previous week in that timeslot for HBO. "Girls,"  another critically-acclaimed HBO comedy, opened the week before with 810,000 viewers in its 10:30 p.m.Sunday timeslot and 1.1 million for two showings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2011
The numbers are preliminary overnights, but based on the 6.0 rating for last night's prime-time game between the Ravens and 49ers, the NFL Network is declaring it the largest Thursday night audience in the channel's history. A tweet from network spokesman Dan Masonson this morning also said the audience for last night's 16 to 6 Ravens vistory was up 43 percent from that of last Thanksgiving. This is the network's sixth season of prime-time Thursday night games. Since it is a holiday weekend, it could be a while before we get more definitive ratings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
Baltimore TV viewers tuned in big time Sunday for the last home game of Ray Lewis. The average audience of all viewers (age 2 and older) was 877,700. Viewership peaked at 4 p.m. with 974,100 viewers watching on WJZ-TV, Baltimore's CBS-owned station. That was the largest audience in the Baltimore market for any show on any channel since last year's Super Bowl on NBC, according to WJZ and Nielsen. That would cover some pretty big events like the Olympics. The total number of people 2+ in the market is 2,707,000, which means one out of every three people living in this market was watching the Ravens victory over the Indianapolis Colts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | david.zurawik@baltsun.com and Sun TV Critic | April 2, 2010
Carol Burnett wants to make one thing perfectly clear about her appearance Saturday night at the Lyric Opera House in Baltimore. "I want everybody to know that the show is about questions and answers," she said in a telephone interview last week. "I want to stress that I'm not getting up there and doing sketches or songs or anything like that. I just come out and show a few clips of some of the favorite old questions and answers on our show, and then we just bump up the lights, and for 90 minutes, we wing it."
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | October 8, 2008
The format of the second presidential debate was described as that of a town hall meeting, but it was pure TV from the "citizens" seated on risers on a brightly lit stage, to the candidates moving about a stage like performers. In TV terms, body language and modes of address were never more important. John McCain lived up to his reputation for excelling in town hall meetings, quickly establishing a soft-spoken intimate relationship with the audience even as he attacked his opponent - two things experts say you are not supposed to be able to do simultaneously.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
An average audience of 4 million watched the Orioles beat the Detroit Tigers 12-3 on cable channel TBS Thursday night. That was up by 54 percent over the audience for a comparable league division series last year. The audience peaked at 5.4 million from 8:15 to 8:30 p.m., according to Nielsen figures supplied by TBS. About 17 percent of homes in Baltimore's cable TV universe were tuned to the game compared with 16 percent in Detroit. #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
The Yankees-O's game on ESPN Sunday night was watched in 1.5 percent of American homes, and 8.3 percent of households in the Baltimore market, according to overnight ratings provided by the sports cable channel. By comparison, the Ravens-Lions game last December on ESPN drew an audience almost five times as large and was seen in 40.2 percent of Baltimore homes. Maybe it's unfair to compare baseball and football given the number of games in a season, but I think ESPN's Sunday Night Baseball has become almost unwatchable -- or, at least, unlistenable with Dan Shulman and John Kruk in the booth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 22, 1991
Sonic YouthWhen: Wednesday, Feb. 27, 8 p.m.Where: Capital CentreTickets: $22.50Call: 481-6000 for tickets, 792-7490 for informationIn theory, at least, Sonic Youth has quite a lot in common with Neil Young. Both are beloved by rock critics. Both operate on the fringes of mainstream rock. And both like to crank their guitar amps as high as they'll go.But one thing these two bands don't have in common is an audience. Which is why, as the Youth open for Young in arena after arena, the group keeps getting the same reaction.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin | October 21, 1991
In a review Monday of the Ballet Theatre of Annapolis, dancer Ethel Leslie was misidentified.The Sun regrets the errors.The Ballet Theatre of Annapolis and the Annapolis Chorale joined their considerable talents last weekend to uplift their audience at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis. At the close of "The Eleventh Commandment," the ballet by artistic director Edward Stewart, the audience stood and applauded both the dancing and the music.Although "The Eleventh Commandment" was the dance that brought the audience to its feet, the strongest of the four diverse works shown by the company belonged to New York City choreographer Jennifer Muller, who set her contemporary dance, arm in arm in arm . . ."
FEATURES
By Claudia Puig and Claudia Puig,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 27, 1996
With the Atlanta Olympics taking up residence in U.S. living rooms for 17 days in midsummer, will Americans still venture out to their local multiplexes?Film distributors are wrestling with that question as they set release schedules for what already promises to be the most crowded movie summer ever. For some, the solution is to counterprogram, or release films that target those less likely to be hooked on the Summer Games; others plan to avoid the July 19-Aug. 4 period altogether.Hollywood's summer, which began May 10 and continues through Labor Day weekend, is scheduled to see the release of 53 major-studio films.
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