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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
For at least a generation of pop-culture consumers, the soundtrack of their lives has included themes from the likes of Mega Man and Super Mario. As they've grown up, the music of video games has branched out - to solo piano, to rock concerts and to symphonic performances. Among the developments is the University of Maryland's Gamer Symphony Orchestra, whose 100-plus members will take to the stage at College Park's Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center on Saturday, May 4. "The quality of video-game music has grown exponentially over the years," says Joel Guttman, president-elect of the group, which specializes in arranging and performing pieces taken from the background music on video games such as Halo, Sonic the Hedgehog and Final Fantasy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
For at least a generation of pop-culture consumers, the soundtrack of their lives has included themes from the likes of Mega Man and Super Mario. As they've grown up, the music of video games has branched out - to solo piano, to rock concerts and to symphonic performances. Among the developments is the University of Maryland's Gamer Symphony Orchestra, whose 100-plus members will take to the stage at College Park's Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center on Saturday, May 4. "The quality of video-game music has grown exponentially over the years," says Joel Guttman, president-elect of the group, which specializes in arranging and performing pieces taken from the background music on video games such as Halo, Sonic the Hedgehog and Final Fantasy.
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NEWS
By Edwin Chen and Edwin Chen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 2004
DETROIT - Laying claim to "a solid record of accomplishment" on civil rights, President Bush told the National Urban League yesterday that he had reached out to blacks and suggested that Democrats take their support for granted. "There is an alternative this year," Bush said. "Take a look at my agenda." But it is precisely his record that many black leaders found wanting. "He's closed his door on black voters [while embracing] ideologically divisive, polarizing policies," said the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, who occupied a front-and-center seat for Bush's speech.
NEWS
By Edwin Chen and Edwin Chen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 2004
DETROIT - Laying claim to "a solid record of accomplishment" on civil rights, President Bush told the National Urban League yesterday that he had reached out to blacks and suggested that Democrats take their support for granted. "There is an alternative this year," Bush said. "Take a look at my agenda." But it is precisely his record that many black leaders found wanting. "He's closed his door on black voters [while embracing] ideologically divisive, polarizing policies," said the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, who occupied a front-and-center seat for Bush's speech.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff | February 4, 2001
The scene: A sitcom family gathers in a semicircle around a telephone, as the youngest child of the family worries that his calls to a pornographic chat line will become known to his father. Action: The mother cries out in horror as she listens to the voice on the other end of the phone. The boy, in an aside, says: "Mom was a teeeeny bit upset." The sound: sustained waves of laughter. The laughter, as rehearsed as the action, is some of the longest-running material on TV and is usually the product of a machine.
FEATURES
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 26, 1997
To accept ourselves as we are or to re-create ourselves in some other image? It's a difficult question, with strong arguments on either side. To see what the experts have to say about it, we attended two recent programs in the Baltimore area. The following information was gleaned from "I Am A Beautiful Person," part of the Wellness Series lectures sponsored by Sheppard Pratt, and "What's New in Cosmetic Surgery: Find Out What It Can Do For You," part of the spring seminar schedule at the Women's Mid-Life Center at Sinai WellBridge Fitness Center.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Staff writer | July 10, 1991
The Columbia Festival of the Arts' 11-day run played to large crowdsand overwhelming audience response, festival organizers said."Generally, it was as successful as last year," said Lynne Nemeth, managing director of the festival. "The audiences were as enthusiastic, ifnot more so."Although the statistics haven't been tabulated, organizers estimate that the festival brought in around $100,000. More than 30,000 people attended, with one-third coming from the Baltimore and Washingtonareas.Organizers have been working since December on arrangements for next summer's festival.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | June 10, 1991
The key to the Kronos Quartet's appearance at Shriver Hall on Saturday came in the final encore and the audience's response to it. The quartet played its own transcription of Jimi Hendrix's "Purple Haze" and the young audience went berserk with joy.The concert celebrated the 25th anniversary of the chamber music series at Shriver Hall, once a bastion of Germanic seriousness in this city. The Kronos concert -- which used amplification, a set that suggested a TV talk show late in the 21st century and sophisticated lighting -- was an index to how much "serious" music has changed since the Shriver Series was inaugurated.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 13, 1991
Some pop stars get trapped in their past and close out their careers endlessly replaying old favorites. Others get trapped by their past, struggling in vain to concoct new material that's as interesting or inventive as their back catalog.Paul Simon, though, has avoided both problems. Not only does his recent work, inspired by the music of Africa and Brazil, rank among his best, but -- as his performance at the Baltimore Arena last night demonstrated -- he even manages to make his oldest hits seem fresh and exciting.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 25, 1991
Remember when Joan Rivers got big laughs at the 1984 Republican Convention by putting down those who didn't rate an invitation to Nancy Reagan's luncheon?If you like that kind of humor -- the kind that celebrates being on the inside and mocks the less fortunate -- you'll probably like "Good & Evil," which premieres at 10:30 tonight on WJZ-TV (Channel 13).You also may be reminded of "Soap," the ABC sitcom in the late 1970s that spoofed soap operas. There's a good reason for that: Both shows were created by Susan Harris.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff | February 4, 2001
The scene: A sitcom family gathers in a semicircle around a telephone, as the youngest child of the family worries that his calls to a pornographic chat line will become known to his father. Action: The mother cries out in horror as she listens to the voice on the other end of the phone. The boy, in an aside, says: "Mom was a teeeeny bit upset." The sound: sustained waves of laughter. The laughter, as rehearsed as the action, is some of the longest-running material on TV and is usually the product of a machine.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | March 3, 1995
Con amore. With love, the Italians say. Performances that are delivered truly con amore are incredibly uplifting and, alas, all too rare.The concert at Maryland Hall last Saturday featuring the extraordinary Ethel Ennis, Maryland's first lady of song, J. Ernest Green's Annapolis Chorale and pianist Stef Scaggiari was one of those uplifting occasions.Everything about the concert -- the singing, the playing, the musical arrangements, the audience response -- was full of love.Each note that comes out of Ethel Ennis is sensitive and joyous, its tonal luster intact.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | January 17, 2002
Honor the life of one of our country's greatest dreamers - Martin Luther King Jr. - this weekend and on Monday at two area events. While the late civil-rights leader's birthday was actually Jan. 15, the national holiday is this Monday, Jan. 21. In celebration of King's vision and enduring legacy, the American Visionary Art Museum will hold events all day Monday, and Port Discovery will hold events all day Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Visitors to the American Visionary Art Museum can take guided tours of the exhibit The Art of War & Peace: Toward an End to Hatred and watch films about King.
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