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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
For at least a generation of pop-culture consumers, the soundtrack of their lives has included themes from the likes of Mega Man and Super Mario. As they've grown up, the music of video games has branched out - to solo piano, to rock concerts and to symphonic performances. Among the developments is the University of Maryland's Gamer Symphony Orchestra, whose 100-plus members will take to the stage at College Park's Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center on Saturday, May 4. "The quality of video-game music has grown exponentially over the years," says Joel Guttman, president-elect of the group, which specializes in arranging and performing pieces taken from the background music on video games such as Halo, Sonic the Hedgehog and Final Fantasy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
For at least a generation of pop-culture consumers, the soundtrack of their lives has included themes from the likes of Mega Man and Super Mario. As they've grown up, the music of video games has branched out - to solo piano, to rock concerts and to symphonic performances. Among the developments is the University of Maryland's Gamer Symphony Orchestra, whose 100-plus members will take to the stage at College Park's Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center on Saturday, May 4. "The quality of video-game music has grown exponentially over the years," says Joel Guttman, president-elect of the group, which specializes in arranging and performing pieces taken from the background music on video games such as Halo, Sonic the Hedgehog and Final Fantasy.
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NEWS
By Edwin Chen and Edwin Chen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 2004
DETROIT - Laying claim to "a solid record of accomplishment" on civil rights, President Bush told the National Urban League yesterday that he had reached out to blacks and suggested that Democrats take their support for granted. "There is an alternative this year," Bush said. "Take a look at my agenda." But it is precisely his record that many black leaders found wanting. "He's closed his door on black voters [while embracing] ideologically divisive, polarizing policies," said the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, who occupied a front-and-center seat for Bush's speech.
NEWS
By Edwin Chen and Edwin Chen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 2004
DETROIT - Laying claim to "a solid record of accomplishment" on civil rights, President Bush told the National Urban League yesterday that he had reached out to blacks and suggested that Democrats take their support for granted. "There is an alternative this year," Bush said. "Take a look at my agenda." But it is precisely his record that many black leaders found wanting. "He's closed his door on black voters [while embracing] ideologically divisive, polarizing policies," said the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, who occupied a front-and-center seat for Bush's speech.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff | February 4, 2001
The scene: A sitcom family gathers in a semicircle around a telephone, as the youngest child of the family worries that his calls to a pornographic chat line will become known to his father. Action: The mother cries out in horror as she listens to the voice on the other end of the phone. The boy, in an aside, says: "Mom was a teeeeny bit upset." The sound: sustained waves of laughter. The laughter, as rehearsed as the action, is some of the longest-running material on TV and is usually the product of a machine.
FEATURES
By Brian McTavish and Brian McTavish,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 3, 2003
Love it or loathe it - or just go with it - the television laugh track remains a staple after five decades of viewer-assisted frivolity. For that triumph or disgrace, one person can be thanked or blamed. Charlie Douglass, who died in April at age 93, was a technical director of TV shows in the 1950s. He noticed that studio audiences didn't laugh as much when jokes were repeated after the first take. So the mechanical and electrical engineer, who helped develop a shipboard radar for the Navy in World War II, created a "laff box" that would supply recorded audience reaction.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | September 21, 1992
Finally, after nearly five months of very loud debate in the media, Murphy Brown is going to respond to Dan Quayle tonight, with probably 35 million viewers watching.The sad thing is that, despite all the TV talk and newspaper analysis, we aren't much smarter about TV and politics, TV and role models, TV and the American family, than we were when all of this started in May. It's mainly been a shouting match of sound bites and fury signifying only how thoroughly we have become a TV culture.
NEWS
Ron Smith | August 18, 2011
A moment ago, I Googled "Ron Paul ignored by media" and came up with 9,222 links. That's a lot of stories about someone being ignored. Here's what happened. In last weekend's Iowa Straw Poll of GOP presidential candidates, the Texas congressman had an exceptionally strong showing, finishing a mere 152 votes behind the winner, Minnesota Rep.Michele Bachmann. Mrs. Bachmann — or the "Queen of Rage," as Newsweek magazine dubbed her — followed her Saturday triumph with Sunday talk show interviews on ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox News Channel and CNN. Ron Paul appeared on none.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
Felicia "Snoop" Pearson has spent much of the past two decades drawn to the gritty glamour of life on the streets, and nearly as much time and energy struggling to break free. Critics will see the arrest of the 30-year-old Baltimore actress on Thursday on drug charges as evidence that she's a career criminal — an image that only was heightened by her portrayal of a cold-blooded assassin on HBO's "The Wire. " But Pearson's friends, and there are many, are profoundly saddened by her latest run-in with police.
FEATURES
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 26, 1997
To accept ourselves as we are or to re-create ourselves in some other image? It's a difficult question, with strong arguments on either side. To see what the experts have to say about it, we attended two recent programs in the Baltimore area. The following information was gleaned from "I Am A Beautiful Person," part of the Wellness Series lectures sponsored by Sheppard Pratt, and "What's New in Cosmetic Surgery: Find Out What It Can Do For You," part of the spring seminar schedule at the Women's Mid-Life Center at Sinai WellBridge Fitness Center.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff | February 4, 2001
The scene: A sitcom family gathers in a semicircle around a telephone, as the youngest child of the family worries that his calls to a pornographic chat line will become known to his father. Action: The mother cries out in horror as she listens to the voice on the other end of the phone. The boy, in an aside, says: "Mom was a teeeeny bit upset." The sound: sustained waves of laughter. The laughter, as rehearsed as the action, is some of the longest-running material on TV and is usually the product of a machine.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Staff writer | July 10, 1991
The Columbia Festival of the Arts' 11-day run played to large crowdsand overwhelming audience response, festival organizers said."Generally, it was as successful as last year," said Lynne Nemeth, managing director of the festival. "The audiences were as enthusiastic, ifnot more so."Although the statistics haven't been tabulated, organizers estimate that the festival brought in around $100,000. More than 30,000 people attended, with one-third coming from the Baltimore and Washingtonareas.Organizers have been working since December on arrangements for next summer's festival.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | June 10, 1991
The key to the Kronos Quartet's appearance at Shriver Hall on Saturday came in the final encore and the audience's response to it. The quartet played its own transcription of Jimi Hendrix's "Purple Haze" and the young audience went berserk with joy.The concert celebrated the 25th anniversary of the chamber music series at Shriver Hall, once a bastion of Germanic seriousness in this city. The Kronos concert -- which used amplification, a set that suggested a TV talk show late in the 21st century and sophisticated lighting -- was an index to how much "serious" music has changed since the Shriver Series was inaugurated.
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