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By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 1998
ALEXANDRA FRICOVA, a 25-year-old native of the Czech Republic who is spending 12 months as an au pair with the family of Boro and Nancy Djordjevic of Severna Park, is learning a new set of holiday traditions."
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NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | March 30, 2009
As the economy gets grimmer, more families are likely looking into hiring a live-in au pair visiting from another country to cover child care in exchange for room and board and a stipend. I asked Christine Connally, a Maryland-based community counselor for Au Pair in America, to give interested parents some things to think about. Here are her questions and answers: * How many hours a week do I need child care? "An au pair can work up to 45 hours per week and a maximum of 10 hours per day. While this stipulation is set by federal regulations governing the au pair program, it is a ground rule that's also just common sense, as you want your au pair focused and alert during her work hours."
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FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | November 16, 1997
IT WILL NEVER be over for Matthew Eappen's mother and father. And it is not quite over for Louise Woodward. But it is over for the rest of us, and that may be the only good to come from Judge Hiller Zobel's decision in the celebrated au pair trial.Deborah and Sunil Eappen will mourn their 8-month-old son for the rest of their lives. The teen-ager with the milkmaid's looks and the stone-cutter's heart must stay in Massachusetts until the prosecution exhausts its appeals.But because Judge Zobel reduced the verdict against Louise Woodward and freed her after time served, working mothers and child-care workers are likewise released from the ordeal of watching their worst fears played out as a Court TV soap opera.
NEWS
By Christina Hernandez and Christina Hernandez,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
Katarzyna "Kate" Gil, Sitting at the kitchen table of her Abingdon home of the past 14 months, Katarzyna "Kate" Gil bounces 3-year-old Caren Grez on her lap and reflects on her experience as an au pair. "It's not like a regular job at the office," she said. "You start feeling something. Day after day, you feel more in common. I really love them like my own kids." The 25-year-old from Poland spends her days looking after Caren and her 5-year-old brother, Evan, when he returns from school.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | March 30, 2009
As the economy gets grimmer, more families are likely looking into hiring a live-in au pair visiting from another country to cover child care in exchange for room and board and a stipend. I asked Christine Connally, a Maryland-based community counselor for Au Pair in America, to give interested parents some things to think about. Here are her questions and answers: * How many hours a week do I need child care? "An au pair can work up to 45 hours per week and a maximum of 10 hours per day. While this stipulation is set by federal regulations governing the au pair program, it is a ground rule that's also just common sense, as you want your au pair focused and alert during her work hours."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 11, 1997
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- After 279 days in a U.S. prison, English au pair Louise Woodward walked free yesterday.In an astonishing turnabout in a trial that has been followed by millions on both sides of the Atlantic, Woodward was released by a state Superior Court judge who reduced her murder conviction to involuntary manslaughter and sentenced her only to the time she had already served."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1999
An Anne Arundel County circuit jury convicted a stableman yesterday of trying to rape his employer's au pair, a Croatian teen-ager who had been in the United States only a few days.Robert Brown, 42, of Lineboro could receive a maximum term of life in prison when Judge Eugene M. Lerner sentences him Jan. 26. Brown was convicted of attempted rape and five related charges stemming from the assault on the 18-year-old at a Gambrills horse farm Nov. 22, 1998."I am very satisfied with the verdict," said M. Virginia Miles, the assistant state's attorney who prosecuted Brown.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 1, 1997
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- It has been an entertaining drama followed by millions, the show known as "The Nanny Murder Trial." But yesterday, as a 19-year-old British au pair was sentenced to life in prison for a murder she steadfastly disavows, and a pair of bereaved parents described their life of daily pain, there was a sense that the final reality of the case was: Everybody loses.A feeling of shock and pity permeated reactions around the country, as parents who face their own child care problems and young baby-sitters alike discussed the jury's guilty verdict Thursday night -- a verdict that defense lawyers said yesterday they would challenge immediately.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2000
A stableman was sentenced yesterday to 35 years in prison for the attempted rape of his employer's Croatian au pair -- a teen-ager who had been in the United States just a few days. Robert Brown, 42, who is nearly illiterate, said nothing in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court as Judge Eugene M. Lerner gave him a sentence that topped the state guidelines of 12 to 20 years. "Here is someone who came looking for a better life in this country and became a victim of crime," Lerner said. The victim was not in the courtroom, and, according to prosecutors, is so ashamed of the assault that she has not told her parents what happened at the Gambrills horse farm Nov. 22, 1998.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 11, 1997
LONDON -- Louise Woodward's home village of Elton erupted with cheers, tears and even fireworks last night after Judge Hiller B. Zobel of Massachusetts announced her freedom."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2000
A stableman was sentenced yesterday to 35 years in prison for the attempted rape of his employer's Croatian au pair -- a teen-ager who had been in the United States just a few days. Robert Brown, 42, who is nearly illiterate, said nothing in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court as Judge Eugene M. Lerner gave him a sentence that topped the state guidelines of 12 to 20 years. "Here is someone who came looking for a better life in this country and became a victim of crime," Lerner said. The victim was not in the courtroom, and, according to prosecutors, is so ashamed of the assault that she has not told her parents what happened at the Gambrills horse farm Nov. 22, 1998.
NEWS
By Diane B. Mikulis and Diane B. Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 30, 1999
QUICHE LORRAINE, Swedish meatballs, pierogies (dumplings), guacamole, Kasspatzle, French pickled vegetables and apple strudel were spread out on the buffet table.But the party was not in Europe or Central America. It was in Glenelg.Thirty au pairs living and working in Central Maryland gathered two weeks ago for a multicultural holiday pot-luck dinner. The young people came to the United States for a year to live with American families and care for their children.Shelly Altman, a coordinator for Au Pair USA, was the party's hostess.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1999
An Anne Arundel County circuit jury convicted a stableman yesterday of trying to rape his employer's au pair, a Croatian teen-ager who had been in the United States only a few days.Robert Brown, 42, of Lineboro could receive a maximum term of life in prison when Judge Eugene M. Lerner sentences him Jan. 26. Brown was convicted of attempted rape and five related charges stemming from the assault on the 18-year-old at a Gambrills horse farm Nov. 22, 1998."I am very satisfied with the verdict," said M. Virginia Miles, the assistant state's attorney who prosecuted Brown.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 1998
ALEXANDRA FRICOVA, a 25-year-old native of the Czech Republic who is spending 12 months as an au pair with the family of Boro and Nancy Djordjevic of Severna Park, is learning a new set of holiday traditions."
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | November 16, 1997
IT WILL NEVER be over for Matthew Eappen's mother and father. And it is not quite over for Louise Woodward. But it is over for the rest of us, and that may be the only good to come from Judge Hiller Zobel's decision in the celebrated au pair trial.Deborah and Sunil Eappen will mourn their 8-month-old son for the rest of their lives. The teen-ager with the milkmaid's looks and the stone-cutter's heart must stay in Massachusetts until the prosecution exhausts its appeals.But because Judge Zobel reduced the verdict against Louise Woodward and freed her after time served, working mothers and child-care workers are likewise released from the ordeal of watching their worst fears played out as a Court TV soap opera.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | November 12, 1997
BOSTON -- Deep down in the decision that Judge Hiller Zobel set before a hungry international audience was a paragraph of self-defense. ''Massachusetts,'' he wrote, ''never has and does not now view Justice as a handmaiden to Tyche, the Goddess of Good Fortune. . . . A court . . . is not a casino.''Maybe not. Maybe the verdicts in this case of the au pair and the dead baby were not as chancy as the Massachusetts lottery. But on Monday 279 became Louise Woodward's lucky number.279 daysIn a reversal that turned a jury's murder conviction into a judge's manslaughter conviction, the British au pair's sentence was reduced from life to time served.
NEWS
November 11, 1997
IT IS rare for a judge to change a jury's verdict. But few people were even angry yesterday when Massachusetts Superior Court Judge Hiller Zobel reduced the second-degree murder conviction of a British au pair for the death of an infant in her care. The new verdict of involuntary manslaughter allowed the judge to reduce Louise Woodward's sentence to the 279 days she has already served in jail rather than a mandatory 15 years before being eligible for parole,Now the 19-year-old can go home to her village in Cheshire, where people were determined to see their daughter vindicated and rescued from an American justice system that has seemed to many Britons rigid and unjust.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 3, 1997
A tip for next time: Mr. Jiang fares better inside the White House than outside.The big argy in England is whether a Massachusetts trial was about the au pair from hell, the parents from hell or the justice system from hell.When there are virtual reality games in Lower Camden Yards, you will know what they mean by ''Charm City.''Sorry. Davey Johnson cannot fire Peter Angelos.Pub Date: 11/03/97
NEWS
November 11, 1997
IT IS rare for a judge to change a jury's verdict. But few people were even angry yesterday when Massachusetts Superior Court Judge Hiller Zobel reduced the second-degree murder conviction of a British au pair for the death of an infant in her care. The new verdict of involuntary manslaughter allowed the judge to reduce Louise Woodward's sentence to the 279 days she has already served in jail rather than a mandatory 15 years before being eligible for parole,Now the 19-year-old can go home to her village in Cheshire, where people were determined to see their daughter vindicated and rescued from an American justice system that has seemed to many Britons rigid and unjust.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 11, 1997
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- After 279 days in a U.S. prison, English au pair Louise Woodward walked free yesterday.In an astonishing turnabout in a trial that has been followed by millions on both sides of the Atlantic, Woodward was released by a state Superior Court judge who reduced her murder conviction to involuntary manslaughter and sentenced her only to the time she had already served."
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