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By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | February 3, 1991
When ABC newswoman Diane Sawyer wanted to know about the U.S. Army'sM-1 tanks, she went to see William F. Atwater at the U.S. Ordnance Museum at Aberdeen Proving Ground.Atwater's job as curator of the museum has turned him into a walking reference book of military history since war erupted in the Persian Gulf. But that doesn't surprise him."We're sort of the official repository of military history," he said.Atwater estimates that the museum is getting about 40 telephone calls a week for information on military tactics, equipment and practices --everything from dog tags to mine fields.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Atwater's will open a restaurant at the Science + Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, an 88-acre mixed-use science campus under development in Baltimore's Middle East neighborhood.  Atwater's will take over the space in the Rangos Building that had been Cuban Revolution, which closed late last year. Opened in February 2013, Cuban Revolution was the first new restaurant to open in the emerging district, which is being developed by the Forest City-New East Baltimore Partnership.   The new restaurant will have its formal opening in early October but will be open for business sometime in mid-September, according to a spokesman for the Forest City Enterprises, Inc. This will be the sixth location for Ned Atwater's Catonsville-based group of cafes and markets.
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FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 1998
"That's the hard part right now," says Darin Atwater, composer and pianist. "I find myself in a place where I'm composing a lot differently."Atwater, 27, who is featured as composer and piano soloist on the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's annual "Live, Gifted and Black" free concert wrote the piano concerto he'll be playing as a throwback to the romantic era.It's based on the spirituals "I Want Jesus to Walk Wid Me" and "Steal Away," and the piano part sounds as though Rachmaninoff were improvising over these familiar songs.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Josephine Atwater, a retired state Department of Human Resources employee who was a founding member of the Renaissance Institute at Notre Dame of Maryland University, died of cancer Thursday at her Halethorpe home. She was 89. Born Josephine Louise McNulty in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Thomas Aloysius McNulty, an Army Corps of Engineers employee, and Catherine Louise Gempp McNulty, who worked at American Can Co. Raised on Poplar Grove Street, she was a 1942 graduate of the Institute of Notre Dame and earned a bachelor of arts degree at Notre Dame of Maryland University after attending Mount St. Agnes Junior College.
NEWS
By Lars-Erik Nelson and Lars-Erik Nelson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 1997
"Bad Boy: The Life and Politics of Lee Atwater," by John Brady. Addison-Wesley, 320 pages. $23.Lee Atwater is remembered these days as a ruthless, cynical Republican political operative who invented much of what is bad in American politics: negative campaigning, the hunt for trivial but divisive "wedge issues," like flag-burning, and racist tactics, like the notorious Willie Horton commercial of 1988. He was a man who believed in nothing - neither religion nor the conservative political ideology he served.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 11, 2004
If you bring sincerity and integrity to your work," Darin Atwater says, "people will feel it." The 34-year-old composer, conductor, pianist and arranger proves that point every time he expresses himself through music. This is especially true when the vehicle for that expression is the Soulful Symphony, the orchestra of African-American musicians he founded in 2000. On Saturday, the ensemble will give a concert at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, launching the first full season there as part of a new partnership with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In paying tribute to former Republican National Committee Chairman Lee Atwater yesterday, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said he could picture the rough-and-tumble political operative who died last Friday at age 40, "halo askew, strumming a guitar instead of a harp . . . getting things ready for the big convention in the sky."And, in fact, yesterday's memorial service at the National Cathedral resembled a political convention itself, as President and Mrs. Bush joined about 2,000 government officials, former colleagues -- some wearing their RNC pins -- and even one-time political foes to mourn Mr. Atwater, who had been battling a brain tumor for a year.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | December 8, 1993
Let's say you're Christmas shopping at Towson Marketplace. You've found a spiffy warm-up suit for junior when you notice something strange going on in the former showroom of Shavitz Furniture.You walk in and someone asks you to select a button from a display bearing such slogans as: "US Troops Out of the Middle East" and "Boycott Excessive Packaging"; someone else hands you a slip of paper and asks you to write down an issue and put the paper in a top hat.And oh yes, a third person asks you for $7 and hands you a program for Mother Lode Productions' original theater piece, "Abbie/Other Works of Art/Lee," written by Joe Brady and Karen Bradley and subtitled "An interactive journey through an art gallery with the mythic figures of the American left and right: Abbie Hoffman and Lee Atwater."
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 7, 1990
WASHINGTON -- He'd do just about anything to win. Play so rough and fight so mean he'd be called "the Machiavelli of American politics," a "born schemer," the "master of negative campaigning" -- and that by his friends.His foes would call him "pathological," say he made national politics look like "the coastline of Valdez, Alaska."Now the brazen, young, wide-eyed warrior is in the race of his life.It is the race for his life.Ever since he collapsed while speaking at a fund-raiser in Washington on Monday, March 5 -- a malignant, non-operable, egg-sized tumor was subsequently discovered in the right side of his brain -- it has been a nightmarish roller-coaster ride for Lee Atwater, the high-profile, 39-year-old chairman of the Republican National Committee.
NEWS
By and Paul West and and Paul West,Washington bureau of The Sun | March 30, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Lee Atwater, the brazen, hardball political fighter who managed President Bush's 1988 campaign and went on to chair the Republican National Committee, died early yesterday morning after a yearlong battle with an inoperable brain tumor.The 40-year-old South Carolinian died at George Washington University Hospital at 6:24 a.m., just over a year after he collapsed while delivering a speech in Washington and was diagnosed with an aggressive, cancerous tumor.President Bush, in a statement released yesterday, said he and Barbara Bush "lost a great friend in Lee Atwater.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
You might know Atwater's best for its breads and soups, but it was its preserves that won a national food award. Atwater's pear and star anise and its plum and vanilla bean preserves were announced as winners at the third annual Good Food Awards ceremony, held last Friday at San Francisco's Ferry Building. The preserves, which are only available, for now, at Atwater's Catonsville location , were among 114 winners from 30 states but the only one from Maryland. The Good Food Awards were created through a collaboration of food producers, farmers, food journalists and independent grocers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2012
After a hiatus of more than a year, Soulful Symphony re-emerged last month to perform for a packed house at the Hippodrome Theatre, inaugurating a concert series that continues there Friday night. Thanks to support from the recently launched Hippodrome Arts Fund, the ensemble of predominantly African-American and Latino musicians became the first resident ensemble at the Hippodrome , the flagship of the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center. "It's a new chapter, a new home — but the same soul," said Darin Atwater, the composer, pianist and conductor who founded Soulful Symphony in 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
The Hippodrome Theatre is largely defined by marquee Broadway shows, from "The Lion King" to "South Pacific. " But starting Monday, the theater aims to be a hub for local arts groups, becoming much more than just a stopping-off spot for touring artists and productions. With the Hippodrome Art Fund, the theater envisions being able to offer a bigger stage and financial support for nonprofit dance companies, music ensembles and more. Broadway Across America, the leaseholder of the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center, which houses the Hippodrome , has contributed $300,000 to launch the effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
A decade ago, something called the Soulful Symphony appeared in Baltimore. With its roster of predominantly African-American players and its emphasis on the vibrant music of founding director Darin Atwater, the ensemble made quite a statement. Its high-energy performances soon earned a sizable fan base and, in 2004, a valuable partner in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. Soulful Symphony hasn't performed for more than a year, but will be back in the spotlight Saturday for a 10th anniversary concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 10, 2010
One recent morning in Catonsville, Ned Atwater was wielding his bench knife, cutting lumps of dough and shaping them into the two types of bread, Irish brown and Irish soda, that he will offer to Baltimore-area bread eaters on St. Patrick's Day. Like many things Irish, there is a lively debate about what goes in their breads. For example, one traditional version of an Irish brown bread calls for oatmeal. For some, this bread offers a hearty taste of the old country. For others, like Atwater, the loaf can be leaden.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker and Kathleen Parker,kparker@kparker.com | January 9, 2009
When it comes to the six Republicans competing for lead dog of the GOP leadership, all are on point: They love Ronald Reagan, are pro-life, advocate small government and promise more diversity and fewer taxes. They are also, with one exception, locked and loaded - armed in Second Amendment solidarity. During a 90-minute debate this week at the National Press Club, only Michael S. Steele, the former Maryland lieutenant governor, confessed to owning no guns. Say what? In a race where Mr. Steele's conservative bona fides are already held in suspicion, did his admission unseal any deal?
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 12, 2003
The rebirth of Belvedere Square was carefully planned and long anticipated. It's great to be able to stop at the refurbished market in North Baltimore for produce, smoked fish or sushi. One of the engines that seems to be powering the market's new life is Atwater's bakery, where all kinds of crusty loaves, scones and pastries can be found. Atwater's also has a nice carryout, which operates from a kitchen where customers seated around a horseshoe-shaped counter can watch the action. On a radiant Saturday afternoon, Belvedere Square Market was bustling.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | September 10, 2008
Late this summer, one of the top food books on Amazon.com dangled an enticing promise: Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day. The book's popularity is testament to how people love fresh bread but loathe the idea of losing a day to bake it. Bread intimidates. The time commitment is a huge part of that, but people also fear the mess or think they'll need an expensive mixer or an advanced yeast degree. And yet, they're drawn to it because, ironically, home-baked bread represents, like almost nothing else, the essence of simple living.
NEWS
August 8, 2007
Gwyn Williams, a Web site developer and manager, died of lung disease Saturday at her Rock Hall home. The former Homeland resident was 64. Born Gwyn Atwater in Baltimore, she was a 1961 Bryn Mawr School graduate who attended Washington College and the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. After living in Westchester County, N.Y., for many years, she moved to Rock Hall in 1991. She worked at Chesapeake Bay Internet Associates as a Web manager and site host for many Eastern Shore businesses, tourist agencies and towns.
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