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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Columbia-based MedStar Health has shed about 1 percent of its work force at its four Baltimore-area hospitals over the past year, less than the layoffs of about 5 percent of its employees at MedStar Washington Hospital Center announced this week, officials said. Most of the 100 Baltimore job losses were through attrition, with a small number of layoffs, MedStar spokeswoman Ann Nickels said. The system's Baltimore-area hospitals, MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, MedStar Harbor Hospital, MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital and MedStar Franklin Square Hospital, employ 10,177 people, she said.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Columbia-based MedStar Health has shed about 1 percent of its work force at its four Baltimore-area hospitals over the past year, less than the layoffs of about 5 percent of its employees at MedStar Washington Hospital Center announced this week, officials said. Most of the 100 Baltimore job losses were through attrition, with a small number of layoffs, MedStar spokeswoman Ann Nickels said. The system's Baltimore-area hospitals, MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, MedStar Harbor Hospital, MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital and MedStar Franklin Square Hospital, employ 10,177 people, she said.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1994
He that troubleth his own house shall inherit the wind, saith the Scriptures. If that's the case, someone at Bell Atlantic hath a hurricane on his or her hands.The Philadelphia-based phone company, which announced a work force reduction of 5,600 positions last week, created an uproar among its employees this week when an internal newsletter gave them the erroneous impression that virtually all those cuts would be layoffs.Making the worst of a bad situation, a question-and-answer article in Bell Atlantic Week flatly informed already-nervous workers that attrition was not included in the figure of 5,600 over three years.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
As he ends his first year on the job, Baltimore police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts is facing questions about whether he is taking too long to remake the agency and develop a crime-fighting strategy. But others say he is being candid about the city's problems and deserves more time to make progress. Batts, 53, said in a wide-ranging interview that he has been making improvements to the agency of nearly 3,000 officers, though not as quickly as he would like. He plans to keep a relentless focus on gangs and address issues of attrition and low pay for officers.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 30, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Sylvia Azriel joined the Army this fall with the kind of enthusiasm the brass loves to see in recruits: She thought the Army was a well-organized, supportive place that would help her "find some purpose in my life."Before two months of basic training were up, however, the Pensacola, Fla., woman was out the door, acknowledging that she couldn't adjust to military life. "It was totally not what I expected," she said.With recruiting in a deep slump, the Pentagon is pinning more and more of its hopes on young women such as Azriel -- without whom, top officials often say, today's military simply could not function.
NEWS
July 10, 2007
Having a qualified teacher in each classroom is a crucial requirement of the federal No Child Left Behind law, but a recent study suggests that teachers are coming and going as if through a revolving door, particularly younger teachers. And it estimates that the cost of so much turnover is more than $7 billion annually. Beyond the financial costs, however, the lack of consistent, high-quality teaching hurts students, especially those in high-poverty, low-performing schools with large minority populations.
NEWS
August 14, 2007
Gordon Brown is receiving lessons in what it is like to be American. Whatever you think of our allies in Washington, they bear a burden for the world that lesser powers like Britain rarely experience fully. For example, they have attracted global opprobrium for locking up without trial in Guantanamo Bay some very dangerous men who might otherwise wreak mayhem in our cities. Also, Americans have for years had to watch mournfully as the star-spangled coffins returned home. Now our government has agreed to take five former UK residents from Guantanamo.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2003
Baltimore school officials ordered the layoffs of 69 people this week, in an effort to reduce a deficit now projected to grow to $41 million by the end of next year. The system's chief operating officer, Mark Smolarz, said yesterday that his office sent certified letters to employees on Thursday, letting them know that their jobs were being eliminated, effective July 3 - the end of the fiscal year. Including vacancies, a total of 95 positions were eliminated, Smolarz said, achieving annual savings of about $6 million.
NEWS
By RICK POPELY AND JIM MATEJA | March 23, 2006
General Motors Corp., awash in $10 billion in red ink, took its first step back from the brink of bankruptcy yesterday when it offered buyouts to its entire hourly work force of 113,000. The bold move, which includes retirement offers for an additional 13,000 workers at bankrupt Delphi Corp., GM's biggest supplier, is the latest retreat by the world's largest automaker. GM employed nearly 500,000 union workers in the United States 20 years ago, when its market share was 40 percent, but its share has fallen to 25 percent this year.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Liz Bowie and Tanika White and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2003
For the first time in years, the Baltimore City school system said it intends to cut spending drastically in an effort to trim a projected $41 million deficit by more than half. Next year's proposed spending plan will be about $43 million less than the current spending, with the bulk of cost savings coming from the elimination of about 600 currently filled positions, school officials said yesterday. Included are layoffs of about 100 people - and possibly more - by the end of this school year, with the other 500 lost through attrition.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
Hiring for federal jobs in Maryland has fallen 30 percent since 2008, and for the first time in years is being outpaced by the number of employees retiring or resigning - a trend that has raised concerns among some about the government's ability to deliver services in the future. The rapid reduction in hiring at Maryland-based federal agencies, a consequence of tighter budgets, mirrors a national trend that analysts say is all but guaranteed to become more pronounced this year as agencies trim spending further under the across-the-board government cuts known as sequestration.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2012
After receiving criticism last school year for cutting high school teaching positions while keeping administrators, Baltimore County Superintendent Joe A. Hairston is proposing to do the reverse next year - preserve classroom teachers and eliminate 46 administrative positions. Hairston presented a proposed $1.23 billion operating budget to the school board Tuesday night that includes an increase of $19.6 million from the current year. "We preserve our teaching positions. We preserve our academic programs for our children," said Hairston, who is leaving the school system when his contract expires in June.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
A charter network that has two schools in Baltimore has a high level of student attrition and of private and public funding that have positioned it to be successful, according to a national report published Thursday. The report on Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP), which opened its first school in Baltimore about a decade ago and recently reached a long-term deal to remain in the city for another 10 years, suggests that the national charter school network's high performance is a result of having advantages over its public school counterparts.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
Baltimore County Executive-elect Kevin Kamenetz said Thursday that he is looking for ways to cut staff and reduce county spending when he takes office next month, as he braces for a lean budget in his first year. County Administrative Officer Fred Homan is reviewing all departments to explore potential staff cuts through attrition and projects that can improve productivity, Kamenetz said. Homan's findings will be presented to Kamenetz on Dec. 6, the day of his swearing-in. Kamenetz has also asked Rob Stradling, the director of information technology, to recommend technology enhancements by February that can be made quickly.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
Legg Mason told investors Thursday that the company expects its headcount will fall by more than 350 worldwide — the number of job cuts announced this week — because it won't replace all the employees who leave voluntarily. Mary Athridge, a Legg Mason spokeswoman, said such a move could also mean a reduction in the Baltimore area beyond the 250 layoffs planned, but the company doesn't have a bottom-line number in mind. The layoffs represent 30 percent of the company's local work force.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | October 19, 2007
Government backlogs are far too familiar to Americans. Many disabled Americans must wait years to receive benefits from the Social Security Administration. Piles of unanalyzed DNA evidence are delaying justice nationwide. And hundreds of thousands of legal immigrants are stuck in line for citizenship because of a backlog of "name checks" at the FBI. But one backlog might top them all. About 730,000 inventors are waiting for patents - the right to a 20-year monopoly on the production and sale of their inventions.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2013
As he ends his first year on the job, Baltimore police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts is facing questions about whether he is taking too long to remake the agency and develop a crime-fighting strategy. But others say he is being candid about the city's problems and deserves more time to make progress. Batts, 53, said in a wide-ranging interview that he has been making improvements to the agency of nearly 3,000 officers, though not as quickly as he would like. He plans to keep a relentless focus on gangs and address issues of attrition and low pay for officers.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | October 19, 2007
Government backlogs are far too familiar to Americans. Many disabled Americans must wait years to receive benefits from the Social Security Administration. Piles of unanalyzed DNA evidence are delaying justice nationwide. And hundreds of thousands of legal immigrants are stuck in line for citizenship because of a backlog of "name checks" at the FBI. But one backlog might top them all. About 730,000 inventors are waiting for patents - the right to a 20-year monopoly on the production and sale of their inventions.
NEWS
August 14, 2007
Gordon Brown is receiving lessons in what it is like to be American. Whatever you think of our allies in Washington, they bear a burden for the world that lesser powers like Britain rarely experience fully. For example, they have attracted global opprobrium for locking up without trial in Guantanamo Bay some very dangerous men who might otherwise wreak mayhem in our cities. Also, Americans have for years had to watch mournfully as the star-spangled coffins returned home. Now our government has agreed to take five former UK residents from Guantanamo.
NEWS
July 10, 2007
Having a qualified teacher in each classroom is a crucial requirement of the federal No Child Left Behind law, but a recent study suggests that teachers are coming and going as if through a revolving door, particularly younger teachers. And it estimates that the cost of so much turnover is more than $7 billion annually. Beyond the financial costs, however, the lack of consistent, high-quality teaching hurts students, especially those in high-poverty, low-performing schools with large minority populations.
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