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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler has been elected president of the national association that represents his peers around the country, becoming the second Marylander to hold that post. Gansler, 49, was chosen Thursday by at the National Association of Attorneys General summer meeting in Anchorage, Alaska. The nonpartisan group brings together the chief legal officers of the states, territories and District of Columbia to deal with issues they face. Presidents of the group typically choose a particular issue to focus on during their yearlong terms.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
- Marylander Thomas E. Perez, who has served as secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor for a little more than a year, is now being eyed for an even more prominent position in President Barack Obama's second-term Cabinet: successor to Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. Perez, a former Maryland labor secretary and Justice Department official, is emerging as a candidate in part because of his extensive legal background but also because he has...
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NEWS
By Sarah Lindenfeld and Sarah Lindenfeld,Contributing Writer | August 2, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Calling himself "Paula Abdullah," Jeffrey Southall wrote love letters from Baltimore's super-maximum-security prison to a man who then sent "Paula" $700. When the warden found out, he froze Southall's prison account. So Southall sued.Alvin Barton found the food too cold at another prison in Maryland. He, too, sued. So did Norman Ryman, who was irate because cheesecake sent to him in prison was delayed in the mail and turned moldy.Enough said? State Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. thinks so. Yesterday, he listed those three from the roughly 700 lawsuits Maryland inmates file each year -- lawsuits which, officials say, cost the state more than $1 million.
NEWS
September 28, 2014
Of all the offices in the federal government, the job of attorney general may be one of the toughest as well the most thankless. Eric H. Holder, who announced last week that he is stepping down as the nation's top law enforcement official six years after becoming the first African-American ever to hold that position, was no stranger to the controversy that comes with the job nor to the endless stream of criticism directed at its occupants. His tenure was not perfect - the failure to crack down sufficiently on the financial speculators who brought our economy to ruin being perhaps the greatest shortcoming.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- A newly formed group of foes of affirmative action began putting pressure yesterday on all 50 state attorneys general to wipe out "the vast majority" of race preferences in state and local government.Calling itself the "Project for All Deliberate Speed," borrowing the phrase the Supreme Court used to order prompt obedience to its school desegregation decision, the group said state officials must act deliberately now to carry out recent Supreme Court court rulings sharply limiting race-based affirmative action.
NEWS
November 20, 2005
With a new study showing that exposure to on-screen smoking prompts many American adolescents to light up, attorneys general from 32 states, including Maryland, want Hollywood to slap anti-smoking admonitions on all new DVDs. They signed a letter sent last week to 10 movie studios asking executives to add anti-smoking public service announcements to all home-viewing releases that depict smoking. "We're urging [studios] to do more," said Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., author of the letter.
NEWS
By Tom Hamburger and Tom Hamburger,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 17, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Forty-four former state attorneys general sent a petition to Congress in recent days asking legislators to investigate the Justice Department's prosecution of former Alabama Gov. Donald Siegelman on corruption charges. "We urge the Congress to take immediate action to investigate this entire matter so that the public may be assured that the outcome is just," the former officials wrote in a letter sent Friday to the House and Senate judiciary committees. Siegelman, a Democrat who also served as Alabama attorney general from 1987 to 1991, was convicted last year of bribery and obstruction of justice.
NEWS
November 12, 1996
CASTING AROUND FOR ways to do something more than worry about juvenile crime, Attorney General J. Joseph Curran hit upon a promising area for action: violence in the media. His concern meshed with those of other professionals dealing with public safety and health. The result is the kick-off of a national campaign aimed at drawing attention to the epidemic of violence that children encounter by watching television.The joint efforts of the National Association of Attorneys General and the American Medical Association are now sparking widespread interest.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
With the legal climate shifting in recent months in the tobacco companies' favor and more states lining up behind a proposed tobacco deal, Maryland is coming under heavy pressure to abandon its hard line against a settlement of its tobacco lawsuit.Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. says he last discussed the state's tobacco case with Gov. Parris N. Glendening about six weeks ago, when he briefed the governor on talks starting between some state attorneys general and tobacco companies.Those talks have reached a critical point, with terms of a draft agreement being circulated among some states.
NEWS
By Georgia C. Marudas and Georgia C. Marudas,Evening Sun Staff | June 28, 1991
*TC Shady companies have found a gold mine in the burgeoning 900 pay-per-call market, and they rake in an estimated $150 million a year by exploiting the weak spots of this new and loosely regulated industry.The 900 business, which provides information and other services over the long-distance networks, is so lucrative and free-wheeling that it attracts rip-off artists who promise much, deliver little and charge a lot, say state and federal regulators.?3 "There are many beneficial and useful 900 applications [but]
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Ask.fm, the anonymous question and answer-based social network linked to several teenage suicides, agreed to revamp its safety procedures in a deal brokered between the site and the Maryland Attorney General's Office. The agreement is similar to one recently struck between Ask.fm and the New York Attorney General's Office. Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler announced the site, owned by Ask.com, will remove repeat abusive posters, monitor user-generated misuse and harassment reports and open new positions for a safety liaison and a law enforcement liaison.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | August 10, 2014
Let's say you are an intelligent, successful federal prosecutor from an elite law school and possessing all of the important political contacts in Washington, D.C. An election occurs. Your party wins, and the president-elect begins to put together a cabinet. One day you receive a call from the transition team. Senior aides want to know if you are interested in becoming the next U.S. attorney general. You take it, right? Wrong. You tell the president-elect's people that they have the wrong number.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Brian E. Frosh, a veteran state senator from Montgomery County who championed gun control and environmental protection, defeated two opponents to win Tuesday's Democratic primary for Maryland attorney general. Frosh, 67, who had trailed in early polls but was better-funded than his rivals, held a commanding lead over Baltimore County Del. Jon. S. Cardin - the nephew of U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin - and state Del. Aisha N. Braveboy of Prince George's County. After a concession call from Cardin, Frosh addressed supporters at the quaint Women's Club of Chevy Chase.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Voters will head to the polls Tuesday to resolve one of the costliest primary fights in Maryland history and nominate scores more politicians for November's general election. With experts forecasting low turnout, candidates were out in force trying Monday to lure voters - long accustomed to September primaries - to cast a ballot in Maryland's first June primary since the Eisenhower administration. "It's really a turnout question in an election like this," said Barbara A. Hoffman, a former state senator and longtime political observer.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Out-of-state groups are pumping last-minute cash into the Maryland attorney general's race, fueling a barrage of campaign ads, including $240,000 in TV commercials purchased by a Florida-based fund that won't reveal its donors. The ads purchased by the Orlando-based Protecting Our Future Action Fund, which was formed Thursday, support Del. Jon S. Cardin of Baltimore County. State Sen. Brian E. Frosh of Montgomery County — considered Cardin's main opposition in Tuesday's Democratic primary — is also benefiting from outside spending.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Del. Jon S. Cardin, a candidate for attorney general, has accused two Baltimore lawmakers of intimidating a campaign volunteer and an anti-Cardin committee of violating campaign finance rules. In a letter to State Prosecutor Emmet C. Davitt over the weekend, Cardin accused Del. Maggie McIntosh and Sen. Lisa A. Gladden of "formal voter intimidation" at a North Baltimore early voting site Thursday. Cardin wrote that the two lawmakers told his volunteer to leave a polling station on East Cold Spring Lane because they "did not like an opponent of theirs to have representation at early voting.
NEWS
April 14, 2013
On Monday, Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler is expected announce a partnership with Facebook on a national campaign to educate teens and parents about safety and privacy when using social media. Gansler, president of the National Association of Attorneys General, will discuss the initiative as he kicks off the NAAG Presidential Initiative Summit, "Privacy in the Digital Age. " The summit is being held at National Harbor, in southern Prince George's County. According to a release from the attorney general's office, the goal of the summit is to bring together attorneys general and representatives of the information technology industry, government and education and others to explore privacy risks and how to limit them.
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,sun reporter | September 8, 2006
Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. has been doing a slow burn. Two years ago, he and a group of fellow attorneys general asked Hollywood executives to insert anti-smoking messages into DVDs and videos of any movie that depicts people lighting up. All they got in return was lip service. Yesterday, the retiring Curran, joined by 40 attorneys general, sent a follow-up letter to 13 studio heads. This time, he enclosed three public service announcements produced by the American Legacy Foundation.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
If state Sen. Brian Frosh has his way, voters will pick Maryland's next attorney general based on experience - his 28 years in the General Assembly, 11 of them as a committee chairman who pushed through measures such as the state's new gun control law. Del. Jon S. Cardin wants citizens to focus more on his vision for fighting cyber crimes - computer attacks he calls the law-enforcement issue of the future. And Del. Aisha N. Braveboy is hoping folks are concerned enough about social-justice issues to prefer her hands-on legal work to protect families from foreclosure and young people facing imprisonment.
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