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NEWS
July 14, 1999
Prosecutor's office is open and effective and respects the lawAs the state's attorney for Baltimore, I have been and continue to be accessible and accountable. I attend community meetings, return telephone calls and respond to media and citizen inquiries. I am an honest, hardworking public servant who represents the citizens of Baltimore in a competent and responsible fashion.The Sun has interviewed me numerous times. I am the only individual in city government who has opened up her office and life to a Sun reporter.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | January 5, 2010
An 18-year-old Baltimore man pleaded guilty to carjacking and drug dealing in federal court Monday. According to his plea agreement, Gary Knight was a member of the Pasadena Denver Lanes, a set of the Bloods gang responsible for the distribution of crack cocaine, heroin and marijuana throughout the city. The Maryland U.S. attorney's office said members have also committed numerous acts of violence, including murder. Knight participated in gang activities from January 2008 through at least May of last year, according to his plea, personally distributing as many as 10 kilograms of heroin and 1.5 kilograms of crack cocaine.
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NEWS
January 29, 1992
From: Roger D. CassellElkridgeOn Jan. 24, 1992, in the Circuit Court for Howard County, the citizens of this state and county were subjected to a farce of the greatest magnitude.Francisco Rodriguez was allowed to plead guilty to first-degree murder in the shooting death of Cpl. Ted Wolf of the Maryland State Police, which took place in March of 1990. Rodriguez was given a life sentence for the crime, subject to the terms of the pleaagreement.Then, to the dismay of all, the judge had the terms ofthe plea agreement sealed.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | August 5, 2009
A man who was jailed without bail for months because a Baltimore police officer said he tried to disarm her was set free Tuesday after Officer Traci L. McKissick changed her story during emotional courtroom testimony. Earlier this year, McKissick told prosecutors that Joseph A. Forrest was the man who stepped on her hand as she held a gun and wrestled with Forrest's 61-year-old uncle, who was killed by police during an altercation in February. But in court last week, McKissick referred to the person who tried to get her gun only as the "mystery man" and "the voice."
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2005
Rod J. Rosenstein, a Justice Department official untethered to the state's political power structure, has emerged as the leading contender to become the next U.S. attorney in Maryland, sources confirmed this week. Rosenstein, 40, serves as principal deputy assistant attorney general for the Department of Justice's tax division. Known by some for his conservative ideological bent, including past membership in the Federalist Society, Rosenstein might have achieved his highest profile to date as a prosecutor for Whitewater independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2004
For decades, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office was regarded by many as the premier office in the country at the tricky and complicated business of prosecuting public corruption. In the late 1960s, '70s, '80s and into the '90s, the office brought down a vice president, a U.S. senator, three congressmen, a speaker of the House of Delegates, a governor, two county executives, a state senator, a city council president, a city councilman, lobbyists, contractors, builders, ministers and others.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1999
The city state's attorney's office will not seek criminal charges against a Baltimore police officer who shot and killed a man in September after mistaking his cellular telephone for a weapon.Homicide Detective Christopher Graul shot Mardio House as he tried to arrest House at Llewelyn and North Montford avenues. House, shot three times in the abdomen, was being sought for failure to appear in court on a drug conspiracy charge.Police have said House reached into the front of his pants moments before the shooting at 11 a.m. Sept.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2004
A federal grand jury has indicted seven Baltimore men who prosecutors say are part of a city heroin ring, the U.S. attorney's office announced yesterday. All have been charged with conspiracy to distribute heroin. Three were also charged with possession with intent to distribute heroin, and Chaka Brewer, 28, was charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm. U.S. Attorney Thomas M. DiBiagio has said prosecuting felons in possession of firearms and dismantling drug organizations are top goals for his office.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1997
The county state's attorney's office has entered cyberspace, introducing a home page on the World Wide Web.Anyone with Internet access can download information on dealing with bad checks, domestic violence, victim rights and the victim witness assistance unit, said Marcie S. Wogan, deputy state's attorney."
NEWS
July 5, 1992
Prosecutor hires 2WESTMINSTER -- The daughter of former Baltimore Colts coach Ted Marchibroda and a veteran state police investigator are the two newest members of the State's Attorney's Office.State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman on Thursday announced that Lonni Marchibroda, 33, is the newest assistant state's attorney and James M. Leete, 50, will serve as the office's second criminal investigator. Both people started their jobs Wednesday.Ms. Marchibroda most recently was an attorney in an Annapolis firm before joining the Carroll office.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | January 18, 2009
The Maryland U.S. attorney's office is pursuing a new drug case against a Baltimore man, despite having recently sent him to prison for life. The move is raising questions about the government's motivation and the strength of the earlier convictions, which the defendant, David "Chicken" Ellerby, has appealed to the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals. Some say it simply emphasizes how dangerous the agency believes Ellerby to be. The 36-year-old has beaten dozens of state charges, including murder and attempted murder, and law enforcement agents consider him one of the city's most dangerous residents.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | July 15, 2008
No charges will be filed against the undercover officer who accidentally shot two Jessup teenagers police suspected of dealing drugs in April, the Howard County state's attorney's office said yesterday. State's Attorney Dario Broccolino wrote in a letter to Police Chief William J. McMahon that prosecutors have concluded the shooting was an accident. About 5 p.m. April 7, undercover narcotics officers stopped two teenagers, Dwain Usery, who was 14 at the time, and Garcia Wilson, who was 15, in the 8300 block of Pleasant Chase Road in Jessup, police said.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | June 12, 2008
A Baltimore County man was charged yesterday with 110 counts of possessing slot machines after police raided dozens of establishments in May, according to the county state's attorney's office. Roy Carroll Bond III, president of Carbond Inc., has been charged more than a dozen times with gambling offenses in the area, but has never been convicted. Two weeks ago, county police declared that the video machines seized during the May raid were used for illegal gambling, and they referred the case to county prosecutors.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,sun reporter | April 4, 2007
Longtime Senior Assistant State's Attorney Michael D. Rexroad arrived at Howard County Circuit Court last week for what he thought was a routine show-cause hearing. But he quickly found that the hearing was a ploy to lure him to Courtroom 1 for a surprise sendoff Thursday to mark his retirement after more than 28 years with the state's attorney's office. He told the assembled judges, prosecutors, public defenders and court staff that he pleaded guilty to retirement on condition that he will spend it relaxing and teaching at the University of Baltimore Law School, his alma mater.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2007
Sentencing of an Ellicott City man convicted of killing his father during a domestic dispute in their home in 2005 has been postponed. The Howard County state attorney's office requested rescheduling of the sentencing to give it time to conduct a psychological review of Jason Chen, according to a document submitted in county Circuit Court. The hearing, scheduled for Wednesday, was postponed until May 31. Assistant State's Attorney David A. Lank said Chen's lawyer, Joseph Murtha, had a psychological evaluation conducted for the sentencing hearing.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | November 17, 2006
Two weeks after his election victory, Maryland Attorney General-elect Douglas F. Gansler named two people to top positions in the office yesterday. Katherine Winfree, a former federal prosecutor who has been Gansler's chief deputy since 1999, will be the senior deputy attorney general. John B. Howard Jr., Gansler's roommate at the University of Virginia law school and a litigator at Venable LLP in Baltimore, will serve as a deputy. The law allows for two deputies, and a second has yet to be chosen.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | January 18, 2009
The Maryland U.S. attorney's office is pursuing a new drug case against a Baltimore man, despite having recently sent him to prison for life. The move is raising questions about the government's motivation and the strength of the earlier convictions, which the defendant, David "Chicken" Ellerby, has appealed to the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals. Some say it simply emphasizes how dangerous the agency believes Ellerby to be. The 36-year-old has beaten dozens of state charges, including murder and attempted murder, and law enforcement agents consider him one of the city's most dangerous residents.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | February 29, 1996
Law enforcement officials wanted a Freeland man with nine lives dead or alive. Yesterday, they got him.Peter C. Gentry, an international financial planner and a recovering alcoholic who lives on a farm on Slab Bridge Road, apparently faked his own death -- twice -- to get out of drunken driving charges. But the 38-year-old, who is very much alive, was brought to justice yesterday with an 18-month jail sentence.His brush with "death" began in November 1991 in Warrenton, Va., where he was stopped on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2006
Soldiers receive medals. Police officers win citations. But what about court-appointed defense attorneys, who quietly labor to represent those accused of the most heinous crimes? On Friday, two of them got some welcome time in the spotlight, receiving the annual John Adams Award for outstanding work defending the indigent in federal court in Maryland. Maryland Federal Public Defender James Wyda described attorneys Charles Bernstein and Michael Schatzow as heroes, but not because they arrested lawbreakers or prosecuted criminals.
NEWS
February 10, 2006
Gangbangers, take note: Trying to firebomb witnesses into silence can get you locked up for the rest of your life. The hefty sentences against two Baltimore men convicted of tossing Molotov cocktails at the home of a community activist who complained about neighborhood drug dealers show the benefit of prosecuting some witness intimidation cases in federal court. U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz sentenced Nakie Harris, 30, to 84 years and Richard Royal, 21, to 60 years in prison, sending an unmistakable message about the seriousness of this crime.
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