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Attorney General

NEWS
June 5, 2014
As a former assistant attorney general in the Child Protection Unit, an advocate for victims of domestic violence, a mother and a woman, I know what it takes to keep our children and families safe. In particular, I know firsthand that we need to arm our state prosecutors with a full array of tools to fight predators including tougher sentences for the worst offenders, new crimes that keep pace with technology and increased victim services. With Maryland's primary election less than four weeks away, getting each candidate's public safety record into the public discourse should be our main concern.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Del. Jon Cardin rejected Thursday the endorsement of a Baltimore-based rapper after learning that the man who calls himself Ski Money is facing charges of human trafficking. Cardin, a candidate for attorney general, said he knew nothing of the rapper's charges and criminal record when he posed for a picture with Lawrence S. Christian, 37, at a fundraiser and his campaign briefly publicized the rapper's support. "I recently learned of the charges that are pending against Mr. Christian, a Baltimore based rapper who endorsed me over Twitter," Cardin, a Baltimore County Democrat, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley is expected to endorse state Sen. Brian E. Frosh for the Democratic nomination for attorney general Thursday, Frosh's campaign announced. Del. Jon S. Cardin of Baltimore County, one of Frosh's two opponents in the June 24 primary, will counter with an appearance by U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin, who is expected to introduce other elected officials who will endorse his nephew at an Annapolis news conference Monday. O'Malley is scheduled to appear at a Frosh rally in Greenbelt, adding his name to a long list of Democratic leaders who are backing the veteran senator over Cardin and Del. Aisha N. Braveboy of Prince George's County.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green | June 3, 2014
You've seen their TV commercials, watched their debates and maybe even gotten some direct mail trashing them. But where do the candidates for governor actually stand on the issues Maryland has confronted during the last few years. And more importantly, which one do you agree with most? Find out using our new interactive scorecard.   Using data from the endorsement questionnaires the Sun editorial board sent to the candidates, we present you with a series of yes or no questions about major issues the state has faced during the last four years.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
The two opponents of Del. Jon S. Cardin in his race for the Democratic nomination for attorney general chastised him during a debate Monday night for skipping almost 75 percent of his committee votes this year. State Sen. Brian E. Frosh of Montgomery County and Del. Aisha Braveboy of Prince George's County said there was no excuse for missing so many voting sessions, where decisions are made on which bills die and which advance to a floor vote. "If you don't show up in Annapolis, if you don't vote, you don't count," Frosh said during the first debate of the attorney general's race, held at the University of Maryland.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
Maryland's three Democratic candidates for attorney general are likely to debate how to enforce environmental laws, fight high-tech crime and crack down on home foreclosures at their first debate Monday night in a race that will likely determine who will be the state's top lawyer. State Sen. Brian E. Frosh, Del. Jon S. Cardin and Del. Aisha Braveboy are seeking the Democratic nomination in a race that party's nominee has won in every election for almost a century. The winner of this year's June 24 primary will face Jeffrey N. Pritzker, a Towson lawyer who would be the first Republican elected to the office since 1919, and Leo Wayne Dymowski, a Libertarian.
NEWS
BiJoe Burris | May 19, 2014
Talk about generation gap. During a Saturday commemoration speech at Morgan State University's commencement, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder lauded Morgan State's band and choir, which  moments earlier had rendered a crowd pleasing performance. Then the 63-year-old Holder turned to the band and asked, “Do you all know Flash Light?” referring to the 1978 hit song by funk troupe Parliament. The song peaked at Number One on the Billboard R&B charts and helped popularize the group's brand of music that became known as P-Funk.
NEWS
May 18, 2014
I wanted to respond to Lawrence S. Greenberg's letter in support of Del. Jon Cardin ( "Cardin ready to be attorney general," May 12). I have only known Mr. Cardin since 2003, as a constituent. But what I can tell you is that when I needed him, he wasn't there for me. I had an issue with the Homestead Tax Credit that I needed to discuss with him, as the attorney general was, in my opinion, intentionally misinterpreting a slightly vague law. I wanted him to introduce a bill to clarify the language so that the real property law and tax property law were consistent with each other.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
A 30-second TV spot by Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler touts his record enforcing environmental laws, vowing that if he's elected governor he'll continue to fight for clean air and a clean Chesapeake Bay. What the ad says : The spot opens with Gansler standing in front of a pair of smokestacks. He says as attorney general, he has forced utilities to install more than $4 billion in pollution controls. He then says he wants to "take on polluters" to save the bay and contends that Maryland currently "protects" companies that dump waste into the bay, keeping their identities secret. "Polluters bought that loophole," he says, and vows as governor to take them on. The facts: The ad overstates Gansler's role in getting the pollution controls.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 15, 2014
Fair warning: this book will make you angry. "The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap," by Matt Taibbi, is a volume of stories. Like the Vietnamese refugee and rape victim in San Diego who applied for public assistance, only to be visited by a "welfare inspector" who barged into her home and began yelling that he would take her children away if he found she was lying about being destitute and not having a man. All this as he's rummaging through her belongings.
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